COVER LETTER EXAMPLES FASHION INDUSTRY : COVER LETTER EXAMPLES

Cover letter examples fashion industry : 2010 fashion trends spring summer : Fashion night out 2011.

Cover Letter Examples Fashion Industry


cover letter examples fashion industry
    fashion industry
  • apparel industry: makers and sellers of fashionable clothing
  • Fashion, a general term for the style and custom prevalent at a given time, in its most common usage refers to costume or clothing style.
  • A conspiratorial organization that is hell bent on forcing women of size to wear frumpy clothing, and to promote anorexia by utilizing uber-skinny models.
    cover letter
  • A letter sent with, and explaining the contents of, another document or a parcel of goods
  • covering letter: a letter sent along with other documents to provide additional information
  • (Cover Letters) Professionally written to lead the reader to review your resume and/or invite you for an interview.
  • Should always accompany your resume when you contact a potential employer. A good cover letter opens a window to your personality (and describes specific strengths and skills you offer the employer). It should entice the employer to read your resume.
    examples
  • (example) exemplar: something to be imitated; "an exemplar of success"; "a model of clarity"; "he is the very model of a modern major general"
  • (example) an item of information that is typical of a class or group; "this patient provides a typical example of the syndrome"; "there is an example on page 10"
  • A thing characteristic of its kind or illustrating a general rule
  • (example) model: a representative form or pattern; "I profited from his example"
  • A person or thing regarded in terms of their fitness to be imitated or the likelihood of their being imitated
  • A printed or written problem or exercise designed to illustrate a rule
cover letter examples fashion industry - The Business
The Business of Fashion: Designing, Manufacturing, and Marketing, 4th Edition
The Business of Fashion: Designing, Manufacturing, and Marketing, 4th Edition
This authoritative text focuses on the organization and operation of the U.S. textiles and fashion industry-how fashion apparel and accessories are designed, manufactured, marketed, and distributed. Since the publication of the 1st edition, the textile/apparel industry has continued to undergo tremendous change. Quick Response strategies have evolved into supply-chain management, Web-based business-to-business and business-to- consumer communications and commerce have grown, and mass customization is a reality. The 4th edition of The Business of Fashion will continue to capture the technological, organizational, and global changes in this dynamic industry with an emphasis on social responsibility.

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159 Charles Street House
159 Charles Street House
Greenwich Village, Manhattan Constructed around 1838 for merchant Henry J. Wyckoff, 159 Charles Street is significant as a relatively rare surviving residential building of the early period of development of the far western section of Greenwich Village and has associations through its occupants with some of the area’s most significant businesses, the maritime trade and brewing industry. It is one of the few surviving Greek Revival style rowhouses in the Hudson River waterfront section of Manhattan, specifically the area west of the Greenwich Village Historic District between West 14th Street and Lower Manhattan. Wyckoff, a prominent tea and wine merchant, built nine buildings on the former grounds of Newgate prison of which this is the only survivor. No. 159 Charles Street was initially leased to merchant James Hammond who operated a lumber business at Leroy and West Streets. Later tenants included local business owners and maritime workers including dock master Archer Martine and schooner captain Alexander Cunningham. In the 1880s the building was acquired by the neighboring Beadleston & Woerz brewery and was used to house brewery workers and in 1930s and 1940s served as the corporation’s offices. A three-story-plus-basement three-bay­wide brick house with brownstone detailing, 159 Charles Street exhibits the simple forms and planar surfaces characteristic of the Greek Revival style. Its most notable feature is the handsome entry incorporating a stone surround with pilasters and a heavy entablature, tall wood pilasters framing a paneled doorway, sidelights, transom bar, and toplights. The house retains its brownstone base and original decorative wrought iron areaway fence ornamented with anthemia. The house’s historic bracketed metal cornice probably dates from the 1870s or 1880s. DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS Early Development of the Far West Village In the early seventeenth century, the area now known as the Far West Village was a Lenape encampment for fishing and planting known as Sapokanican.2 During Dutch rule the second director general (1633-37) of New Amsterdam, Wouter Van Twiller, “claimed” a huge area of land in and around Greenwich Village for his personal plantation, Bossen Bouwerie, where he cultivated tobacco. Starting in the 1640s freed African slaves, such as Anthony Portugies, Paulo d’Angola, Simon Congo, Groot Manuel and Manuel Trumpeter, were granted and farmed parcels of land near current-day Washington Square, Minetta Lane, and Thompson Street establishing the nucleus of a community of African-Americans that remained in this location until the Civil War. Under British rule during the eighteenth century, the area of Greenwich Village was the location of the small rural hamlet of Greenwich. This building is located to the west of that development in an area that was part of a vast tract of land along the North (Hudson) River amassed during the 1740s by Sir Peter Warren. An admiral in the British Navy, Warren earned a fortune in prize money and had extensive land holdings throughout the New York region. As historian Jill Lepore suggests based on a review of documents at The New-York Historical Society, “Warren appears to have owned a sizable number of slaves.”3 Warren’s three daughters, who resided in England, inherited the property after his death in 1752 and slowly sold off portions of the land. In 1788, Richard Amos, one of Warren’s trustees, acquired the portion of the estate north of today’s Christopher Street, between Hudson and Washington Streets. The land west of this tract was purchased by 1794 by Abijah Hammond, another of Warren’s trustees and also owner of holdings to the southeast. Amos began having streets laid out in his parcel in 1796 and had subdivided the land into lots by 1817. Charles Street, said to be named for his relative, Charles Christopher Amos, was laid out by 1799. According to the Federal censuses for New York (1790-1800), Hammond owned several slaves, while Amos had none. Between 1796 and 1797 the first penitentiary in New York State, known as the “State Prison at Greenwich” or Newgate State Prison was constructed on a four-acre site extending between today’s Christopher and Perry Streets and Washington Street and the North (Hudson) River shoreline on land acquired from Abijah Hammond. Newgate’s massive buildings, surrounded by high stone walls, were designed by Joseph-Francois Mangin, later the architect of City Hall (1802-11, with John Mc Comb, Jr.) and (old) St. Patrick’s Cathedral (1809-15) on Mott Street.4 Prisoners were transferred there from the old Bridewell Prison in City Hall Park. “A more pleasant, airy, and salubrious spot could not have been selected in the vicinity of New York,”5 stated an observer in 1801, and the prison, one of the area’s most imposing structures, became a tourist attraction. Ferry service was established from the prison’s dock to Hoboken in 1799. The Greenwich Hotel, opened in 1809, near t
159 Charles Street House
159 Charles Street House
Greenwich Village , Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States Constructed around 1838 for merchant Henry J. Wyckoff, 159 Charles Street is significant as a relatively rare surviving residential building of the early period of development of the far western section of Greenwich Village and has associations through its occupants with some of the area’s most significant businesses, the maritime trade and brewing industry. It is one of the few surviving Greek Revival style rowhouses in the Hudson River waterfront section of Manhattan, specifically the area west of the Greenwich Village Historic District between West 14th Street and Lower Manhattan. Wyckoff, a prominent tea and wine merchant, built nine buildings on the former grounds of Newgate prison of which this is the only survivor. No. 159 Charles Street was initially leased to merchant James Hammond who operated a lumber business at Leroy and West Streets. Later tenants included local business owners and maritime workers including dock master Archer Martine and schooner captain Alexander Cunningham. In the 1880s the building was acquired by the neighboring Beadleston & Woerz brewery and was used to house brewery workers and in 1930s and 1940s served as the corporation’s offices. A three-story-plus-basement three-bay­wide brick house with brownstone detailing, 159 Charles Street exhibits the simple forms and planar surfaces characteristic of the Greek Revival style. Its most notable feature is the handsome entry incorporating a stone surround with pilasters and a heavy entablature, tall wood pilasters framing a paneled doorway, sidelights, transom bar, and toplights. The house retains its brownstone base and original decorative wrought iron areaway fence ornamented with anthemia. The house’s historic bracketed metal cornice probably dates from the 1870s or 1880s. DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS Early Development of the Far West Village In the early seventeenth century, the area now known as the Far West Village was a Lenape encampment for fishing and planting known as Sapokanican.2 During Dutch rule the second director general (1633-37) of New Amsterdam, Wouter Van Twiller, “claimed” a huge area of land in and around Greenwich Village for his personal plantation, Bossen Bouwerie, where he cultivated tobacco. Starting in the 1640s freed African slaves, such as Anthony Portugies, Paulo d’Angola, Simon Congo, Groot Manuel and Manuel Trumpeter, were granted and farmed parcels of land near current-day Washington Square, Minetta Lane, and Thompson Street establishing the nucleus of a community of African-Americans that remained in this location until the Civil War. Under British rule during the eighteenth century, the area of Greenwich Village was the location of the small rural hamlet of Greenwich. This building is located to the west of that development in an area that was part of a vast tract of land along the North (Hudson) River amassed during the 1740s by Sir Peter Warren. An admiral in the British Navy, Warren earned a fortune in prize money and had extensive land holdings throughout the New York region. As historian Jill Lepore suggests based on a review of documents at The New-York Historical Society, “Warren appears to have owned a sizable number of slaves.”3 Warren’s three daughters, who resided in England, inherited the property after his death in 1752 and slowly sold off portions of the land. In 1788, Richard Amos, one of Warren’s trustees, acquired the portion of the estate north of today’s Christopher Street, between Hudson and Washington Streets. The land west of this tract was purchased by 1794 by Abijah Hammond, another of Warren’s trustees and also owner of holdings to the southeast. Amos began having streets laid out in his parcel in 1796 and had subdivided the land into lots by 1817. Charles Street, said to be named for his relative, Charles Christopher Amos, was laid out by 1799. According to the Federal censuses for New York (1790-1800), Hammond owned several slaves, while Amos had none. Between 1796 and 1797 the first penitentiary in New York State, known as the “State Prison at Greenwich” or Newgate State Prison was constructed on a four-acre site extending between today’s Christopher and Perry Streets and Washington Street and the North (Hudson) River shoreline on land acquired from Abijah Hammond. Newgate’s massive buildings, surrounded by high stone walls, were designed by Joseph-Francois Mangin, later the architect of City Hall (1802-11, with John Mc Comb, Jr.) and (old) St. Patrick’s Cathedral (1809-15) on Mott Street.4 Prisoners were transferred there from the old Bridewell Prison in City Hall Park. “A more pleasant, airy, and salubrious spot could not have been selected in the vicinity of New York,”5 stated an observer in 1801, and the prison, one of the area’s most imposing structures, became a tourist attraction. Ferry service was established from the prison’s dock to Hoboken in 1799. Th

cover letter examples fashion industry
cover letter examples fashion industry
Career Essentials: The Cover Letter
Today’s economy leaves little room for second chances in the job market. Hiring managers are swamped with applications. What are you doing to rise to the top of the pile and get noticed? If it isn't creating a cover letter driven by facts and filled with punch, you aren't doing enough. The cover letter is often overlooked as a key marketing tool – the perfect introduction. It can be blank and uninteresting or it can offer the potential employer exactly what they are seeking. Don’t overlook this simple step that can improve your chances over other candidates. This book walks you through the various elements of a good cover letter, taking you through each step with plenty of examples to show exactly what you need to know to create the best cover letter over and over again. Make yours the one that brings the light of relief into the recruiter's eye as they see the perfect candidate. At just over a hundred pages, this concise, easy to read guide is full of professional information that will make your job search take off.

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