SOLID WOOD CONFERENCE TABLES. SOLID WOOD

Solid Wood Conference Tables. Antique Table Leg.

Solid Wood Conference Tables


solid wood conference tables
    solid wood
  • Solid wood is a term most commonly used to distinguish between ordinary lumber and engineered wood, but it also refers to structures that do not have hollow spaces.
  • Generally refers to furniture that is constructed using solid wood and does not include the use of engineered wood products.
  • Solid wood means that it is composed of wood with no particle board or wood fiber. It's the resulting board milled from the tree. Au naturel, if you will. Solid wood may be hard (as from walnut) or soft (like pine or fir).
    conference
  • A linking of several telephones or computers, so that each user may communicate with the others simultaneously
  • A formal meeting for discussion
  • A formal meeting that typically takes place over a number of days and involves people with a shared interest, esp. one held regularly by an association or organization
  • a prearranged meeting for consultation or exchange of information or discussion (especially one with a formal agenda)
  • league: an association of sports teams that organizes matches for its members
  • a discussion among participants who have an agreed (serious) topic
    tables
  • (table) postpone: hold back to a later time; "let's postpone the exam"
  • Present formally for discussion or consideration at a meeting
  • (table) a set of data arranged in rows and columns; "see table 1"
  • Postpone consideration of
  • (table) a piece of furniture having a smooth flat top that is usually supported by one or more vertical legs; "it was a sturdy table"
solid wood conference tables - Alera Products
Alera Products - Alera - Verona Veneer Series Bow Front Desk Shell, 71w x 42d x 29-1/2h, Mahogany - Sold As 1 Each - Combining veneer elegance with modular format versatility. - Premium-grade veneers and solid woods are fine finished, with durability suited to everyday commercial applications. - Conference overhang with full-length modesty panel. - Solid wood edge with a reeded profile. - Two grommet holes for cable and wire management.
Alera Products - Alera - Verona Veneer Series Bow Front Desk Shell, 71w x 42d x 29-1/2h, Mahogany - Sold As 1 Each - Combining veneer elegance with modular format versatility. - Premium-grade veneers and solid woods are fine finished, with durability suited to everyday commercial applications. - Conference overhang with full-length modesty panel. - Solid wood edge with a reeded profile. - Two grommet holes for cable and wire management.
Alera - Verona Veneer Series Bow Front Desk Shell, 71w x 42d x 29-1/2h, Mahogany - Sold As 1 Each

Combining veneer elegance with modular format versatility. Premium-grade veneers and solid woods are fine finished, with durability suited to everyday commercial applications. Conference overhang with full-length modesty panel. Solid wood edge with a distinctive reeded profile. Two grommet holes for convenient cable management. Use with Return Shell to create an "L" grouping, or combine with Bridge Shell and Credenza Shell to form a full "U" workstation. Top Shape: Bow Front; Top Color/Finish: Mahogany; Width: 71 in; Depth: 41.38 in.

Combining veneer elegance with modular format versatility.
Premium-grade veneers and solid woods are fine finished, with durability suited to everyday commercial applications.
Conference overhang with full-length modesty panel.
Solid wood edge with a reeded profile.
Two grommet holes for cable and wire management.

Includes one desk shell.

79% (14)
Lee Valley Lions
Lee Valley Lions
LEE VALLEY LIONS 4 WAVETECH CHIEFTAINS 8 November 14 1993 Great Britain Under-21 captain Drew Chapman joined Chieftains at the weekend and immediately helped them off the bottom of the Southern Conference table, writes John Castle. Chapman, 20, was signed from Basingstoke on a trial basis late last week and his registration was hurried through in time for him to make his debut at fellow strugglers Lee Valley Lions. Even though Lions were not at full strength after picking up injuries at Slough the night before, this was much more encouraging performance from Chieftains who looked far more solid at the back with the inclusion of Chapman and deservedly won, to record their second successive league win. "It's great to be off the bottom" said Chieftains player-coach Karl Goebel, who celebrated with his first hat-trick of the season. Though Karl Rogers is still being troubled by a nagging knee injury, Tony Cimelli is fit again and Matt Giles' elbow injury did not seem to worry him. "We also seem to have got over the worst of the flu bug that swept through the club last week," added Goebel. Chieftains will be hoping to consolidate on their performance at Lions when they visit Swindon Wildcats tomorrow - victory would set them up for a possible first double headed success on Sunday when Solihull are the visitors to Riverside. CHIEFTAINS - Scorers: Cyr 1+0, McLoughlin 1+0, Rogers 1+3, Smith 1+2, Anderson 1+0, Goebel 3+1. WAVETECH CHIEFTAINS 14 LEE VALLEY LIONS 3 December 9 1993 Chieftains achieved a morale boosting victory over weakened Lee Valley Lions, writes Mick Jordan. Chelmsford never looked like losing this one sided affair with Lions aiding their own downfall with an undisciplined performance that saw them pick up over 100 minutes in penalties. Lions did keep in touch with their hosts early on, indeed goals from Paul Williams and Steve James levelled the score at 2-2 after 13 minutes. Rob McCaig scored Lions third and final goal an the powerplay at 24.39 but the Chieftains had already struck five through Mickey Keen (2), Rick Smith, Karl Rogers and Karl Goebel - three of these coming on the powerplay. In the second half of the match Chieftains started to enjoy themselves, scoring regularly past a bemused John Matassa in Lions goal. Lee Valley's indiscipline continued with coach Lindsay Miles and Neil Stower being ejected by referee Meier. Chelmsford's goals came largely from the sticks of imports Keen (5+3) and Smith (3+6) with further strikes from Shaun McFadyen (2), Matt Giles and Tony Cimelli. The result keeps the hapless Lions firmly at the foot of the table whilst Chieftains leapfrog Streatham Redskins after this long awaited and fully deserved victory. WAVETECH CHIEFTAINS 5 LEE VALLEY LIONS 10 January 22 1994 PREVIEW I would like to welcome Lee Valley Lions to Riverside tonight, writes Karl Goebel player/coach. Chieftains will be looking for a victory this evening after suffering a heavy defeat last Saturday against Milton Keynes Kings and a loss to Paisley Pirates on Sunday at home. MATCH REPORT Chieftains were defeated with a scoreline which flattered the visitors, writes Mick Jordan. With both sides battling hard it was a close run thing until the final minutes when McCaig and Chieftains Cimelli were involved in fracas. The resulting penalty left a 4 on 3 advantage for the Lions who sealed the game with two late strikes. Lions took an early lead through Jon Becket and ex-Chieftain Adam Anderson, but Lloyd McKinney hit back for Chelmsford at 5.53. A Mickey Keen slapshot at 11.08 put the Chieftains level - Keen making the most of the powerplay opportunity. Lions were ahead once more just 52 seconds later - Fred Perlini scoring his first of the night. Early in the second period Chieftains pulled ahead with two further strikes from Keen, but three straight goals from Perlini put the Lions in the driving seat at 6-4. Jamie Randall put the Chieftains back in the game at 42.21 but this was matched by Gary Dodds at 50.33. The Fred Perlini show was far from over however, the Canadian scoring a further three goals to take his tally to seven including seven of the last eight Lee Valley goals. CHIEFTAINS - 1 James Grindlay 4 Drew Chapman 5 Gary McLoughlin 7 Gary McGeorge 8 Karl Rogers 9 Brett Shepherd 10 rick Smith 11 Tony Cimelli 15 Mark Norfolk 16 Lloyd McKinney 17 Mickey Keen 18 Phil Donovan 19 Karl Goebel 20 Jamie Randall 30 Stewart Woods. LIONS - 1 Scott Bonner 4 Paul Marshall 6 Robin Andrew 8 Howard Wiggan 9 Gary Dodds 10 Steve James 12 Michael Michael 14 Darren Fitzpatrick 17 Glen Moorhouse 19 Neil Stower 20 Rob McCaig 21 Darcy Cahill 27 Paul Grech 28 Kevin Maguire 33 Nicky Braithwaite 52 Jon Beckett. LEE VALLEY LIONS 10 WAVETECH CHIEFTAINS 5 February 6 1994 This proved to be a near repeat performance of the previous evening with Chieftains fading badly in a disappointing final period, writes Mick Jordan. The improved Lions must th
US Supreme Court
US Supreme Court
When the seat of the federal government was transferred permanently to Washington, D.C., in 1800, no provision was made for housing for the Supreme Court. Less than two weeks before the Court was to convene, Congress resolved to let the Court use a room in the Capitol. The Court moved into the Old North Wing (image above), meeting in various rooms from February 1810 to December 1860. During the early years when construction displaced the Justices, they had to meet in nearby homes or taverns. Eventually the Court occupied a courtroom that had been especially designed for it in the basement beneath the new Senate chamber. When the Court moved upstairs in 1861, the old courtroom became the law library for both Congress and the Court, seen here in this c. 1895 photograph. The Supreme Court was housed in what is now called the restored Old Senate Chamber from 1861 to 1935. Although the chamber was more spacious and dignified than the basement one, there was no dining room (the Justices lunched in the robing room), and no individual office space for the Justices and their staff (the Justices often worked at home). Chief Justice William Howard Taft and the Associate Justices admired architect Cass Gilbert’s model for a new Supreme Court building in 1929. Taft had begun lobbying for a separate building as early as 1912, and redoubled his efforts when he became Chief Justice in 1921. Taft not only persuaded Congress to fund the nearly $10 million building, giving the Court its own home for the first time, but he also oversaw its planning and initial construction. When the cornerstone was laid in 1932, Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes said of Taft, who had died two years before: “This building is the result of his intelligent persistence.” To a country sunk deep in the Great Depression, Chief Justice Hughes added: “The Republic endures and this is the symbol of its faith.” Gleaming bone white and austere among its distinguished neighbors on Capitol Hill, its stately facade evoking the long-enduring glory of ancient Rome, the Supreme Court Building imposes a mood of decorum. The aura of formality is no accident. When architect Cass Gilbert submitted his design in May, 1929, he planned “a building of dignity and importance suitable…for the permanent home of the Supreme Court of the United States.” Gilbert has been chosen by a commission led by Chief Justice William Howard Taft. Gilbert’s associates were Cass Gilbert, Jr., and John R. Rockart, with executive supervision by David Lynn, Architect of the Capitol. Into the Building the architects put about three million dollars’ worth of marble. For the exterior walls alone a thousand freight car loads of flawless stone come from Vermont—along with a 250-ton slab specifically cut for sculptor James E. Fraser’s allegorical figures at the entrance. Georgia marble was chosen for the outer walls of four courtyards that divide the building into a cross-shaped center core and a gallery of offices and corridors. Nearly square, the resulting structure is 92 feet high and stretches 385 feet on its longest side. The interior walls are faced with marble quarried in Alabama. Opposite the formal entrance, at the east end of the aptly named Great Hall, is the Court Chamber proper—82 by 91 feet, with a coffered ceiling 44 feet high. Gilbert walled this imposing room with Ivory Vein marble from Spain. For the 24 massive columns he insisted on marble of a particularly delicate tint, called light Siena, from the Old Convent quarry in the Italian province of Liguria. From Italy the rough stone went to a firm of marble finishers in Knoxville, Tennessee, who dressed and honed the blocks into 72 slightly tapered cylinders, 11 feet in circumference at the widest. Three sections went into each 30-foot column, to be topped by an Ionic capital. Darker marble from Italy and Africa gives color to the floor. Against the marble the room gains richness from its fittings: tones of red in carpet and upholstery and heavy draperies, highly polished luster in solid Honduras mahogany, gleaming bronze latticework in gates to the side corridors. And in 1973, new lighting, new paint, and new gilding restored the ornamented ceiling to a brilliance time had since dimmed since its installation nearly 40 years before. Like Taft, Gilbert did not live to see his dream building completed. He died in 1934. The Court held its first session in the new building on October 7, 1935. Not everyone liked the new building. Associate Justice Harlan Fiske Stone, who later became Chief Justice, at first called it “almost bombastically pretentious…wholly inappropriate for a quiet group of old boys such as the Supreme Court.” One of the old boys reportedly said that he and his brethren would be “nine black beetles in the Temple of Karnak.” Another—undoubtedly thinking of exotic pomp rather than domestic party symbols—remarked that the Justices ought to enter it riding on elephants. Such comments suggest how different men

solid wood conference tables
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