DESIGN YOUR OWN DRAPERIES : DESIGN YOUR

DESIGN YOUR OWN DRAPERIES : BUY FAUX WOOD BLINDS.

Design Your Own Draperies


design your own draperies
    draperies
  • Cloth coverings hanging in loose folds
  • The artistic arrangement of clothing in sculpture or painting
  • A curtain (sometimes known as a drape, mainly in the United States) is a piece of cloth intended to block or obscure light, or drafts, or water in the case of a shower curtain. Curtains hung over a doorway are known as portieres.
  • Long curtains of heavy fabric
  • (drapery) curtain: hanging cloth used as a blind (especially for a window)
  • (drapery) cloth gracefully draped and arranged in loose folds
    design
  • Decide upon the look and functioning of (a building, garment, or other object), typically by making a detailed drawing of it
  • the act of working out the form of something (as by making a sketch or outline or plan); "he contributed to the design of a new instrument"
  • Do or plan (something) with a specific purpose or intention in mind
  • an arrangement scheme; "the awkward design of the keyboard made operation difficult"; "it was an excellent design for living"; "a plan for seating guests"
  • plan: make or work out a plan for; devise; "They contrived to murder their boss"; "design a new sales strategy"; "plan an attack"
design your own draperies - The Ultimate
The Ultimate Curtain Book: A Comprehensive Guide to Creating Your Own Window Treatments
The Ultimate Curtain Book: A Comprehensive Guide to Creating Your Own Window Treatments
The best-selling comprehensive guide to creating your own window treatments. Learn to make professional-looking curtains, drapes, blinds, and valances-from choosing the best style to cutting, making, and fitting. Over 35 practical, step-by-step projects.

I felt as if I were being told interior design secrets that had been kept from me for years. Curtains have always been something I thought should be left to the experts -- or at least to J.C Penneys. But who better knows what a room needs than yourself? Some of the projects I especially enjoyed were how to make velvet rose tiebacks and a stained glass window shade and how to add painted effects to your curtains with stencils.

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Statue of Liberty from the Staten Island Ferry
Statue of Liberty from the Staten Island Ferry
Upper New York Bay I believe this enterprise will take on very groat proportions. If things turn out as I hope they will this work of sculpture will become of great moral importance. The sculptor Frederic Auguste Bartholdi wrote these prophetic words in 1871, nearly fifteen years before his grand creation, the Statue of Liberty, was completed. The statue was intended to symbolize man's enduring belief in liberty, and to commemorate the long-standing friendship between the United States and France. It is, moreover, a monument to the idealism, perseverance, generosity, and hard work of people both here and in France who, like Bartholdi, had faith In the/'great moral importance" of the statue. With the passage of time the significance of the Statue of Liberty has deepened and expanded, until she has become the primary symbol of American liberty, independence and freedom. Standing in New York harbor, she has greeted millions of immigrants arriving in America, and thus has come to symbolize the hope for a better life in a new homeland, free from tyranny and oppression. Although Liberty has become quintessentially American, the idea for the statue originated in France. It was first suggested by Edouard-Rene Lefebvre de Laboulaye (1811-1683). Laboulaye was an historian, author, and the foremost French authority on American constitutional history. A great admirer of America, he had published a three-volume history of the United States, a satirical story "Paris in America", and numerous articles espousing the Union cause during the Civil War, He was the principal figure of a group of French intellectuals who, during the Second Empire, advocated Republican rule for France, They viewed American government as exemplary and took pride in the role played by Frenchmen such as Lafayette in the formation of the American republic. Thus, the initial idea from which the Statue of Liberty resulted was in keeping with Laboulaye's sentiments and political philosophy. At a dinner given by him in the summer of 1865 at his estate at Glatigny, near Versailles, Bartholdi, who was one of the quests, listened to a discussion concerning gratitude between nations. Labouiaye, emphasizing the friendship between France and America, commented, "If a monument to independence were to be built in America, I should think it very natural if it were built by united effort, if It were a common work of both nations,," Historical events at the time, especially in France but also in the United States, made the construction of such a monument an action of potential political significance. In America, the Civil War had just ended with the republic intact, but President Lincoln had been assassinated. The common people of France were profoundly disturbed by this tragic event, so much so that a public subscription was initiated to fund a gift to Mrs. Lincoln which would express the sympathies of the French people. A gold medal was made and inscribed with the words "Dedicated by the French Democracy to Lincoln". This tribute was opposed by the French monarchy then in power; the medal had to be struck in Switzerland and smuggled to the American embassy in France, Republicans such as Laboulaye, who opposed the monarchy of Napoleon III, no doubt deeply resented this act of suppression, directed against a memorial to a leader of a democracy. Laboulaye must have recognized that the construction of a great monument to Liberty would constitute a statement of strong political belief, one which would strengthen the image of republicanism in France. Thus, the construction of the Statue of Liberty had distinct propagandists overtones. By 1877, after much political turmoil, the ends sought by Laboulaye and other Republicans were achieved- monarchy was overturned and the Third Republic founded. By 1871 positive steps toward the creation of the statue were taken, Bartholdi, who never lost interest in the project, had however, been occupied in the political difficulties of France, He fought in the Franco-Prussian War and witnessed the heartbreak!ng loss of his native Alsace to the enemy. In 1871, the war at an end, he determined on the advice of Laboulaye to visit the United States. He sailed in June on the Pereire. armed with instructions and letters of introduction, and well-prepared to study America's reactions to the proposed monument. He travelled extensiveIy-**as far west as San Francisco-enjoying all that he encountered. He met with many prominent men, including President U, S, Grant, Senator Charles Sumner, and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Everywhere he discussed the statue he received enthusiastic response. Upon his return to France in the fall he was able to report positively on American interest; he had, in addition, selected the site for the monument —Bedloe's Island in New York harbor, at the threshold of the New World. The precise theme of the monument had also been determined—a statue of colossal
Statue of Liberty, backside
Statue of Liberty, backside
Liberty State Park, Jersey City, New Jersey I believe this enterprise will take on very groat proportions. If things turn out as I hope they will this work of sculpture will become of great moral importance. The sculptor Frederic Auguste Bartholdi wrote these prophetic words in 1871, nearly fifteen years before his grand creation, the Statue of Liberty, was completed. The statue was intended to symbolize man's enduring belief in liberty, and to commemorate the long-standing friendship between the United States and France. It is, moreover, a monument to the idealism, perseverance, generosity, and hard work of people both here and in France who, like Bartholdi, had faith In the/'great moral importance" of the statue. With the passage of time the significance of the Statue of Liberty has deepened and expanded, until she has become the primary symbol of American liberty, independence and freedom. Standing in New York harbor, she has greeted millions of immigrants arriving in America, and thus has come to symbolize the hope for a better life in a new homeland, free from tyranny and oppression. Although Liberty has become quintessentially American, the idea for the statue originated in France. It was first suggested by Edouard-Rene Lefebvre de Laboulaye (1811-1683). Laboulaye was an historian, author, and the foremost French authority on American constitutional history. A great admirer of America, he had published a three-volume history of the United States, a satirical story "Paris in America", and numerous articles espousing the Union cause during the Civil War, He was the principal figure of a group of French intellectuals who, during the Second Empire, advocated Republican rule for France, They viewed American government as exemplary and took pride in the role played by Frenchmen such as Lafayette in the formation of the American republic. Thus, the initial idea from which the Statue of Liberty resulted was in keeping with Laboulaye's sentiments and political philosophy. At a dinner given by him in the summer of 1865 at his estate at Glatigny, near Versailles, Bartholdi, who was one of the quests, listened to a discussion concerning gratitude between nations. Labouiaye, emphasizing the friendship between France and America, commented, "If a monument to independence were to be built in America, I should think it very natural if it were built by united effort, if It were a common work of both nations,," Historical events at the time, especially in France but also in the United States, made the construction of such a monument an action of potential political significance. In America, the Civil War had just ended with the republic intact, but President Lincoln had been assassinated. The common people of France were profoundly disturbed by this tragic event, so much so that a public subscription was initiated to fund a gift to Mrs. Lincoln which would express the sympathies of the French people. A gold medal was made and inscribed with the words "Dedicated by the French Democracy to Lincoln". This tribute was opposed by the French monarchy then in power; the medal had to be struck in Switzerland and smuggled to the American embassy in France, Republicans such as Laboulaye, who opposed the monarchy of Napoleon III, no doubt deeply resented this act of suppression, directed against a memorial to a leader of a democracy. Laboulaye must have recognized that the construction of a great monument to Liberty would constitute a statement of strong political belief, one which would strengthen the image of republicanism in France. Thus, the construction of the Statue of Liberty had distinct propagandists overtones. By 1877, after much political turmoil, the ends sought by Laboulaye and other Republicans were achieved- monarchy was overturned and the Third Republic founded. By 1871 positive steps toward the creation of the statue were taken, Bartholdi, who never lost interest in the project, had however, been occupied in the political difficulties of France, He fought in the Franco-Prussian War and witnessed the heartbreak!ng loss of his native Alsace to the enemy. In 1871, the war at an end, he determined on the advice of Laboulaye to visit the United States. He sailed in June on the Pereire. armed with instructions and letters of introduction, and well-prepared to study America's reactions to the proposed monument. He travelled extensiveIy-**as far west as San Francisco-enjoying all that he encountered. He met with many prominent men, including President U, S, Grant, Senator Charles Sumner, and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Everywhere he discussed the statue he received enthusiastic response. Upon his return to France in the fall he was able to report positively on American interest; he had, in addition, selected the site for the monument —Bedloe's Island in New York harbor, at the threshold of the New World. The precise theme of the monument had also been determ

design your own draperies
design your own draperies
Creative Window Treatments (Creating Your Home Series)
Getting a little sick of those pastel bed sheets stuck up with push pins since 1993 when you moved into your new apartment, but stumped for a plan? No more! Here's an idea book for every kind of creative window treatment you could imagine (and many, obviously, that you couldn't, or you wouldn't still have those sheets stuck up there!). Window shades, blinds, drapes, valances (I know, you don't know what that is yet--read the book ...), it's all in here. If you can't come up with an idea for some nifty window coverings after seeing this book, better call Sears Home Decorating. You are hopeless.

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