PRIMITIVE SHUTTERS. SHUTTERS

Primitive shutters. Vertical blinds replacement parts. Pinch pleat drapes instructions.

Primitive Shutters


primitive shutters
    primitive
  • a person who belongs to an early stage of civilization
  • Relating to, denoting, or preserving the character of an early stage in the evolutionary or historical development of something
  • a mathematical expression from which another expression is derived
  • Having a quality or style that offers an extremely basic level of comfort, convenience, or efficiency
  • crude: belonging to an early stage of technical development; characterized by simplicity and (often) crudeness; "the crude weapons and rude agricultural implements of early man"; "primitive movies of the 1890s"; "primitive living conditions in the Appalachian mountains"
  • Relating to or denoting a preliterate, nonindustrial society or culture characterized by simple social and economic organization
    shutters
  • (shutter) a hinged blind for a window
  • (shutter) close with shutters; "We shuttered the window to keep the house cool"
  • Close the shutters of (a window or building)
  • Close (a business)
  • (shutter) a mechanical device on a camera that opens and closes to control the time of a photographic exposure
primitive shutters - Primitive
Primitive
Primitive
A neo-primitive cult, possessing secret government documents filled with terrifying information about global warming, kidnaps a famous fashion model and holds her hostage, forcing her to act as their spokesperson. As time runs out, her estranged daughter allies with a dangerous activist group to rescue her, while battling dark agendas from the government and Big Oil.



From the International Thriller Writers' Interview With Author Mark Nykanen



By Cym Lowell |





Thrillers includes a wide range sub-genres. Primitive, by Mark Nykane, explores the world of environmental terrorism. Mark flourished in his career as an on-camera investigative correspondent for NBC, often toiling in undercover assignments, and winning four Emmys and an Edgar for his achievements. He learned the world of environmental threats firsthand.



In Primitive, Sonya Adams, a maturing model, is kidnapped by a neo-primitive cult sequestered in the remote beauty of the Pacific Northwest. Cult members call their compound Terra Firma, and want to draw attention to their doomsday environmental message, which is based on a terrifying government document that they've obtained. They want to use Sonya as their spokeswoman in podcasts, assuming that her beauty and presence will enhance their chilling message.


Surrounded by majestic mountains and picturesque forests, Sonya is outraged by what is done to her, and fights for her life against her kidnappers. But she also faces dangers unknown to her from big energy companies and the government, which collude to try to silence her along with her kidnappers. The heroine's only hope might be her estranged daughter, Darcy, who is determined to rescue her mother, requiring a hunt akin to tracking down Islamic militants. But Darcy, in turn, is stalked by a ruthless bounty hunter, Johnny Bracer, who plans on following the young woman to her mother so he can claim a huge reward.



We asked Mark a few questions about himself and his writing:


If you were stranded on a desert island, what one book would you like to have with you and why?


I would want the latest, most definitive history of the world, hopefully heavy in natural science and cosmology. Why? Because I could learn while I am stranded.


If you were stranded on a desert island, what one character from your book would you like to keep you company and why?


I would choose Darcy because she has a spirit much like my own: curious, a fighter, relentless. I know your readers will think it must be sexual attraction. Truly, that's not the case..


That said, Darcy is an attractive young woman. [Editor: h-m-m]


Who is your favorite thriller character in the genre?


I know it's always diplomatic to point to the characters created by other authors when you're asked this question, but the blunt truth is that my favorite characters are the ones who have come to life for me and changed me as much as they've changed one another on the page. So with that in mind, I'd have to say that my favorite characters are Sonya and Darcy in Primitive, because they have such a conflict-ridden relationship, yet they're both profoundly affected by the deep feelings that they hold for each other - and by the tumultuous events that quickly overtake them. But I also love Ashley Stassler and Diamond Girl in The Bone Parade. Again, it's probably the relationship between the two of them that captivates me most. They are both extraordinarily willful characters who come up against each other continually. Diamond Girl utterly shocked me - and readers, too, I should add - time and again.

75% (7)
Found at Lost Lake, 240 seconds
Found at Lost Lake, 240 seconds
I don't do many self-portraits. And I post far fewer than I take. This isn't because I have an aversion to my self-portrait, I just find my photographic brain doesn't quite always click in that way. I don't take too many selfies because I don't see all that many. If I saw more, I would probably take more. Nonetheless, I do actually enjoy them when I can find them, particularly when taking them with pinhole such as this. It does present a bit more of a challenge as my camera has no self timer, so I have to hurry opening and closing the shutter with the shorter speeds or I will blur out, and with the longer ones I have to be patient enough to stand still for 2 or 4 or 8 minute stretches. But I did see this one, and I was able to get an interesting image of it with my pinhole. This was taken on my first trip up to Lost Lake. We were pretty amazed at the tranquility of this lake. I had meant to get up here for quite some time and had just never quite made it. So on this warm summer day, we figured to give it a shot and were well rewarded with a jewel of a lake. The water was warm enough that you didn't even notice you were standing in it after about 20 seconds. The lake was full of newts lazily swimming by. And we had a great view of Mt. Hood. My pinhole for the day was loaded with Efke IR film as the skies were pretty clear and bright, conditions that I tend to prefer shooting infrared. The slow film, combined with the Red 29 filter in the camera made for some long exposures despite the very bright light. 4 minutes in fact, and it is still about a stop under I think. Not by much, but a little. I really like the roots in the foreground and the light on them, perhaps my favorite part of this image. The tricky thing about self portraits with the pinhole is that they have such a wide field of view it is tough to figure out where to stand as to not be either too large or too small in the frame. I think I did alright here.
White Shutter Table $435 ** SOLD***
White Shutter Table $435 ** SOLD***
- One-of-a Kind Hand made of reclaimed shutters & old, beautiful wood - Shabby Chic Cream Finish - Top is Gorgeous rich stained & sealed wood with burls & knot holes - Great Entryway piece or Serving Piece for kitchen/dining/outdoor patio. SofaTable too! - Perfect Accent Piece for any French Country, Shabby Chic or Cottage Style Living. - 64" Long x 21 1/2" wide x 33" tall BARGAIN PRICE: $435

primitive shutters
primitive shutters
Shutter Island
The year is 1954. U.S. Marshal Teddy Daniels and his new partner, Chuck Aule, have come to Shutter Island, home of Ashecliffe Hospital for the Criminally Insane, to investigate the disappearance of a patient. Multiple murderess Rachel Solando is loose somewhere on this remote and barren island, despite having been kept in a locked cell under constant surveillance. As a killer hurricane relentlessly bears down on them, a strange case takes on even darker, more sinister shades—with hints of radical experimentation, horrifying surgeries, and lethal countermoves made in the cause of a covert shadow war. No one is going to escape Shutter Island unscathed, because nothing at Ashecliffe Hospital is what it seems. But then neither is Teddy Daniels.

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