WHOLESALE EXTERIOR SHUTTERS : WHOLESALE EXTERIOR

WHOLESALE EXTERIOR SHUTTERS : RETRACTABLE AWNINGS PARTS : BEST BLACKOUT DRAPES.

Wholesale Exterior Shutters


wholesale exterior shutters
    exterior shutters
  • Designed specifically for outdoor use.
  • Shutters constructed for use on the outside of a building or structure. Exterior shutters are generally built from materials that naturally withstand the outdoor environment.
  • Often decorative panels fitted to the exterior of a house
    wholesale
  • sweeping: ignoring distinctions; "sweeping generalizations"; "wholesale destruction"
  • Sell (goods) in large quantities at low prices to be retailed by others
  • the selling of goods to merchants; usually in large quantities for resale to consumers
  • at a wholesale price; "I can sell it to you wholesale"
wholesale exterior shutters - Cooper Wiring
Cooper Wiring Devices 9505TRWS Aspire Tamper Resistant Duplex Receptacle, White Satin
Cooper Wiring Devices 9505TRWS Aspire Tamper Resistant Duplex Receptacle, White Satin
Receptacle is residential grade, duplex, tamper resistant with a UL Listed shutter system and impact-resistant thermoplastic face and back body that is virtually unbreakable. An oversized strap provides a solid base for mounting and virtually eliminates "floating" installations. Thermoplastic construction ultrasonically welded top and backbody; extra-long, extra-wide mounting straps; number 12 and number 14 push-in terminals; backwire clamps on side terminals; easy-access ground screws; built-in wire strippers. Meets all UL 498 requirements, (file no. E15058); CSA Certified, C22.2 no. 42 (file no. 6914 (6233-01); NOM Certified. Flammability rating: V2 per UL 94. temperature rating: -40 degrees C to 65 degrees C. TR designations provides visual identification. UL, cULus Listed.

88% (10)
Marcus McLemore House (1869-70)
Marcus McLemore House (1869-70)
aka Lasker Home for Homeless Children 1019 16TH Street, Galveston, Texas 77550 The Lasker Home for Children is an unusual and important example of Greek revival architecture. The house was constructed after the Civil War, although it bears a striking resemblance to antebellum houses in Galveston such as the Ball House (1857) and the Grover House (1859). All three structures are large, threebay Greek Revival dwellings whose porches were supported originally by four columns, and which had side halls. The shouldered architraves and the pointed lintels over the windows and door resemble prototypes in the pattern books of Asher Benjamin. This could indicate a construction date in the 1850s, if it were not for the fact that Greek Revival homes continued to be built in postwar Galveston. The octagonal cypress columns are indicative of the Reconstruction period, and the house was likely built in 1869-70, according to available documents. The Lasker Home for Children has had major additions made to the rear and north sides, but these date from the turn-of-the-century and 1912. Because of their age and sympathy with the original structure in massing, materials, and fenestration, they are not intrusive. The Lasker Home for Children is a large, frame, two- story Greek Revival building raised on tall brick piers. Its walls are covered with narrow clapboards. The three-bay front faces east on the northwest corner of Avenue K and 16th Street. The building has a low, hipped roof with central double dormer on the east, or front, elevation of the house. A double gallery with railing and turned balusters extends across the front and halfway down the south side. The galleries and their entablatures are supported by octagonal cypress columns with Doric capitals, with classical details of curved brackets and a line of modillions under wide eaves. The lintels over the two windows on the first floor front repeat the fine detailing of the trim of the main entrance, which is a single door with four lights over the doorway and three on each side. The door has one large glass with a smaller wooden panel below. There are still several panes of the original etched glass in the doorway. The house has four entrances, one on each side of the building. The L-shaped addition was built in 1912, on the west and north facades. This addition has an open porch on the first floor, rear (south side), with a screened porch above on the second story. A divided stairway leads to the first floor gallery and main entrance. The exterior walls are painted dark yellow, which is the original color. The windows have six-over-nine or six-over- six lights, although some have been replaced by two-over-two lights. All windows were once shuttered, but some blinds have been lost. The 1889 Sanborn insurance map shows a long, rectangular, two-story house, with a second two-story, square building joined to its northwest corner. A large cistern is shown in the "L" formed by the two buildings, and some small outbuildings are shown in the yard. The 1899 Sanborn map depicts the house with double galleries front and back, and a porch and entrance on the south side. The small building on the northwest corner of the 1889 map is now absent. A two-story, rectangular building is now shown adjacent to the house on the southwest corner. There is a small outbuilding back of the house, and a stable on the alley. The 1912 Sanborn map shows the outline of the building as it is today, enlarged by the additions made in 1912 and by the galleries added on the south side. The front door opens onto a broad side hall with gently rising stairs. The stair-railing has turned balusters and a simple urn-shaped newel. The hall is paneled over plaster, although the modern paneling will be removed in the course of the present renovations. There are three administration rooms on the first floor, which were the original parlors and dining room. A single door from the hall is the entrance to the front room on the south side of the house. Here there are four windows. The two front ones have six-over-nine, the side ones six-over-six, lights. A wide archway leads to the next room. This room has a single door to the hall and two windows with six-over-six lights. A similar archway leads into the office, which is a large, rectangular room with double doors to the hall, windows with six-over-six lights in the south wall, and a corner fireplace with wooden over mantle in the northeast corner of the room. A single door in the west wall opens to the children’s study room. This room also has a fireplace using the same chimney as the one in the office. The windows here in the south wall have six-over-six lights. Behind the study is a very large dining room with double doors leading to the back hall. Here there are two windows with two-over-two lights on the south wall, and six-over-six in the back wall. The hall makes a right- angle turn at the dining room, where can be found the back stairs, cella
American Express Company Building
American Express Company Building
Financial District, Manhattan The 21-story (plus basement), neo-classical American Express Co. Building was constructed in 1916-17 to the design of James L. Aspinwall, of the firm of Renwick,Aspinwall & Tucker, the successor to the architectural practice ofthe eminent James Renwick. Part of the "Express Row" section oflower Broadway, this site had been the location of American Express' headquarters since 1874; by the time the companypurchased the property in 1903, it was one of the largest financialinstitutions in New York City. This skyscraper, in which all of thefirm's operations were to be consolidated, was initiated in 1914under the firm's aggressive new president, George C. Taylor. The concrete-and-steel-framed building has an H-shaped plan with tallslender wings arranged around central light courts, a type of planemployed from the 1880s through the 1910s to provide offices withmaximum light and air. Faced in white brick and terra cotta above a granite base, both facades employ the tripartite composition ofbase-shaft-capital then popular for the articulation of skyscrapers,with a colonnaded base and upper portion. The Broadway entrancefeatures a double-story Corinthian colonnade with large archedwindows. The building completed the continuous masonry wall ofits blockfront and assisted in transforming Broadway into the"canyon" of neo-classical masonry office towers familiar to thisday. One of the giants of American finance, the American ExpressCo. was formed in 1850 as an express business in the easternUnited States. The transfer of funds became a large component ofits operations, and American Express initiated its innovativeMoney Order in 1882 and the "Traveler's Cheque" in 1891. Duringits years in this building, American Express emerged dominant inforeign express and financial services, grew into one of the world'sleading travel-related organizations, and launched its credit card in1958. American Express moved its headquarters elsewhere in1975, but retained travel services here. The building was also theheadquarters over the years of other prominent firms, including investment bankers J.& W. Seligman & Co.(1940-74) and the American Bureau of Shipping, a maritime concern (1977-86). In 1854 the American Express Co. purchased a lot on Vesey Street in New York City as the site for its stables. The company's first New York headquarters were in an impressive marble Italianate palazzo at 55-61 Hudson Street (1857-58, John Warren Ritch), which had a busy freight depot on the ground story with a spur line from the Hudson River Railroad.8 A stable was constructed nearby at 4-8 Hubert Street (1866-67, Ritch & Griffiths).9 The company prospered sufficiently that headquarters were moved in 1874 from the wholesale shipping district into rented offices in two five-story brownstone commercial buildings at 63 and 65 Broadway, that were owned by the Harmony family. (The company purchased the buildings and site in 1903). In 1890-91 the company constructed a new ten-story building by Edward H. Kendall on the site of its former headquarters on Hudson Street.10 By 1903 the company had assets of some $28 million, second only to the National City Bank of New York among financial institutions in the city. At the end of the Wells-Fargo reign in 1914, an aggressive new president, George Chadbourne Taylor (1868-1923), who had worked his way up through the company over the previous thirty years, decided to build a new headquarters. The old buildings, dubbed by the New York Times as "among the ancient landmarks"11 of lower Broadway, were inadequate for such a rapidly expanding concern. In March 1914, Renwick, Aspinwall & Tucker filed for the construction of a 32-story concrete-andsteel-framed office tower in which all of the company's operations, then in four separate buildings, were to be consolidated. The building proposal of 1914 was abandoned, probably due to the war in Europe, but was resurrected two years later in a reduced form, at an estimated cost of $1 million. The 21-story (plus basement) neo-classical American Express Co. Building, with concrete-andsteel piers and reinforced concrete floor slabs above concrete caissons, was constructed by the Cauldwell-Wingate Co. On a lot 80 feet wide (slightly less on the rear) and 210 feet deep, the building has an H-shaped plan with tall slender wings arranged around central light courts. The facades, organized in the tripartite scheme of baseshaft-capital then popular for New York skyscrapers, are faced in white brick and terra cotta above a granite base. The Broadway facade has a three-story base featuring a double-story Corinthian colonnade with large arched windows ("a bank front effect" according to the Times), that correspond to the main room inside containing counters for travel and financial services. A window grid on the Trinity Place facade also lights this room. The uppe

wholesale exterior shutters
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