What are the determinants of investment. Investement club.

What Are The Determinants Of Investment

what are the determinants of investment
  • A gene or other factor that determines the character and development of a cell or group of cells in an organism, a set of which forms an individual's idiotype
  • (determinant) a determining or causal element or factor; "education is an important determinant of one's outlook on life"
  • antigenic determinant: the site on the surface of an antigen molecule to which an antibody attaches itself
  • A factor that decisively affects the nature or outcome of something
  • A quantity obtained by the addition of products of the elements of a square matrix according to a given rule
  • (determinant) deciding(a): having the power or quality of deciding; "the crucial experiment"; "cast the deciding vote"; "the determinative (or determinant) battle"
  • The action or process of investing money for profit or material result
  • A thing that is worth buying because it may be profitable or useful in the future
  • outer layer or covering of an organ or part or organism
  • An act of devoting time, effort, or energy to a particular undertaking with the expectation of a worthwhile result
  • the commitment of something other than money (time, energy, or effort) to a project with the expectation of some worthwhile result; "this job calls for the investment of some hard thinking"; "he made an emotional investment in the work"
  • investing: the act of investing; laying out money or capital in an enterprise with the expectation of profit
    what are
  • Often, the population to be studied produces paired values, in other words, each individual or experimental result contributes a set of two values. This section briefly describes what bivariate data are.
  • characteristic features of science and how science differs from other areas of human knowledge
what are the determinants of investment - Determinants of
Determinants of Democratization: Explaining Regime Change in the World, 1972-2006
Determinants of Democratization: Explaining Regime Change in the World, 1972-2006
What are the determinants of democratization? Do the factors that move countries toward democracy also help them refrain from backsliding toward autocracy? This book attempts to answer these questions through a combination of a statistical analysis of social, economic, and international determinants of regime change in 165 countries around the world in 1972-2006, and case study work on nine episodes of democratization occurring in Argentina, Bolivia, Hungary, Nepal, Peru, the Philippines, South Africa, Turkey, and Uruguay. The findings suggest that democracy is promoted by long-term structural forces such as economic prosperity, but also by peaceful popular uprisings and the institutional setup of authoritarian regimes. In the short-run, however, elite actors may play a key role, particularly through the importance of intra-regime splits. Jan Teorell argues that these results have important repercussions both for current theories of democratization and for the international community's effort in developing policies for democracy promotion.

77% (12)
00000DSC 0075
00000DSC 0075
There were several measures that Kissinger advocated to deal with this alleged threat, most prominently, birth control and related population-reduction programs. He also warned that "population growth rates are likely to increase appreciably before they begin to decline," even if such measures were adopted. A second measure was curtailing food supplies to targeted states, in part to force compliance with birth control policies: "There is also some established precedent for taking account of family planning performance in appraisal of assistance requirements by AID [U.S. Agency for International Development] and consultative groups. Since population growth is a major determinant of increases in food demand, allocation of scarce PL 480 resources should take account of what steps a country is taking in population control as well as food production. In these sensitive relations, however, it is important in style as well as substance to avoid the appearance of coercion." "Mandatory programs may be needed and we should be considering these possibilities now," the document continued, adding, "Would food be considered an instrument of national power? ... Is the U.S. prepared to accept food rationing to help people who can't/won't control their population growth?" Kissinger also predicted a return of famines that could make exclusive reliance on birth control programs unnecessary. "Rapid population growth and lagging food production in developing countries, together with the sharp deterioration in the global food situation in 1972 and 1973, have raised serious concerns about the ability of the world to feed itself adequately over the next quarter of century and beyond," he reported. The cause of that coming food deficit was not natural, however, but was a result of western financial policy: "Capital investments for irrigation and infrastructure and the organization requirements for continuous improvements in agricultural yields may be beyond the financial and administrative capacity of many LDCs. For some of the areas under heaviest population pressure, there is little or no prospect for foreign exchange earnings to cover constantly increasingly imports of food." "It is questionable," Kissinger gloated, "whether aid donor countries will be prepared to provide the sort of massive food aid called for by the import projections on a long-term continuing basis." Consequently, "large-scale famine of a kind not experienced for several decades—a kind the world thought had been permanently banished," was foreseeable—famine, which has indeed come to pass
prod de determinant
prod de determinant
“prod de determinant” a spectral pachyderm 42" wide 5'5" tall a wall hanging Dog loo dog house, a netted burden of the wake of consumption, flotsam, jetsam, invisible dark portents written on the floor with a wooden staff.

what are the determinants of investment
what are the determinants of investment
Social Determinants of Health
Social Determinants of Health, 2E gives an authoritative overview of the social and economic factors which are known to be the most powerful determinants of population health in modern societies. Written by acknowledged experts in each field, it provides accessible summaries of the scientific justification for isolating different aspects of social and economic life as the primary determinants of a population's health.

The new edition takes account of the most recent research and also includes additional chapters on ethnicity and health, sexual behaviors, the elderly, housing and neighborhoods.

Recognition of the power of socioeconomic factors as determinants of health came initially from research on health inequalities. This has led to a view of health as not simply about individual behavior or exposure to risk, but how the socially and economically structured way of life of a population shapes its health. Thus exercise and accidents as as much about a society's transport system as about individual decisions; and the nation's diet involves agriculture, food manufacture, retailing, and personal incomes as much as individual choice. But a major new element in the picture we have developed is the importance of the social, or psycho-social, environment to health. For example, health in the workplace for most employees - certainly for office workers - is less a matter of exposure to physical health hazards as of the social envrionment, of how supportive it is, whether people have control over their work, whether their jobs are secure. A similar picture emerges in other areas ranging from the health importance of the emotional envrionment in early childhood to the need for more socially cohesive communities.

Social Determinants of Health, 2E should be read by those interested in the wellbeing of modern societies. It is a must for public health professionals, for health promotion specialists, and for people working in the many fields of public policy which we now know make such an important contribution to health.