OPPOSITE OF BROWN ON COLOR WHEEL - ON COLOR WHEEL

OPPOSITE OF BROWN ON COLOR WHEEL - USED ALLOY WHEELS BIRMINGHAM - WHEELS AMERICA LOS ANGELES.

Opposite Of Brown On Color Wheel


opposite of brown on color wheel
    color wheel
  • A circle with different colored sectors used to show the relationship between colors
  • A color wheel or color circle is either: * An abstract illustrative organization of color hues around a circle, that show relationships between primary colors, secondary colors, complementary colors, etc.
  • color circle: a chart in which complementary colors (or their names) are arranged on opposite sides of a circle
  • Colors arranged in a certain order in the shape of a circle.
    opposite
  • (of someone taking a leading part in a play or movie) In a complementary role to (another performer)
  • being directly across from each other; facing; "And I on the opposite shore will be, ready to ride and spread the alarm"- Longfellow; "we lived on opposite sides of the street"; "at opposite poles"
  • In a position on the other side of a specific area from; facing
  • antonym: a word that expresses a meaning opposed to the meaning of another word, in which case the two words are antonyms of each other; "to him the antonym of `gay' was `depressed'"
  • face-to-face: directly facing each other; "the two photographs lay face-to-face on the table"; "lived all their lives in houses face-to-face across the street"; "they sat opposite at the table"
    brown
  • of a color similar to that of wood or earth
  • Dark-skinned or suntanned
  • Of a color produced by mixing red, yellow, and black, as of dark wood or rich soil
  • (of bread) Made from a dark, unsifted, or unbleached flour
  • fry in a pan until it changes color; "brown the meat in the pan"
  • an orange of low brightness and saturation
opposite of brown on color wheel - What's Up,
What's Up, Duck?: A Book of Opposites (Duck & Goose)
What's Up, Duck?: A Book of Opposites (Duck & Goose)
Little siblings of Duck and Goose fans rejoice! The stars of the bestselling Duck & Goose and Duck, Duck, Goose return in this board book for preschoolers, this time, to introduce basic opposites. Goose carries an ohso-heavy log, while duck easily balances a light-as-a-feather feather. Thistle is one fast bird, but Goose is slooo-w. And when Duck is sound asleep, Goose is wide awake. With a simple text and colorful illustrations–plus the inimitable characters, of course–here’s a wonderful, and humorous, introduction to an important concept.


From the Board edition.

Little siblings of Duck and Goose fans rejoice! The stars of the bestselling Duck & Goose and Duck, Duck, Goose return in this board book for preschoolers, this time, to introduce basic opposites. Goose carries an ohso-heavy log, while duck easily balances a light-as-a-feather feather. Thistle is one fast bird, but Goose is slooo-w. And when Duck is sound asleep, Goose is wide awake. With a simple text and colorful illustrations–plus the inimitable characters, of course–here’s a wonderful, and humorous, introduction to an important concept.


From the Board edition.

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Historical Junction City. C. 1908. Plus some words from Wordster.
Historical  Junction City. C. 1908. Plus some words from Wordster.
The intro to a story I'm writing. A work in progress. Two weeks of frosty weather arrived mid-season to nip at the windowsills of Temperance; otherwise rain had characterized the cooler months. This was in 1908, a mild year. An early spring arrived to embrace the little town, bringing hints of bluer skies; yet, far into the season, rain laden clouds lingered to nurse the greening landscape. Nestled in one of the inland valleys of Oregon, the little town sat near a shallow bend in the foothills of the Cascade Mountains. Visible across the widening valley, the violet brim of the Coastal Range rolled northward to parallel the loftier line of the Cascades. The name of the little town requires a brief explanation. Close on the construction of the railroad – sometime around 1870 – pietist farmers immigrated to the area; in their wake, real estate speculators, in league with the proprietors of newly established businesses, promptly established a local post office. Soon after, homes of ingenuous design spread in foursquare patterns over the town’s loose weave of graveled streets. In those earlier days, establishments selling alcoholic beverages had been assiduously excluded from the community – thus the name Temperance: a reverencing before posterity of those sober practices the city founders venerated. The name also served to project the restrained habits and reserved tastes of these early residents. But by 1908 the community had become more tolerant of various pastimes, and two saloons were able to operate in a small way at the opposite ends of Front Street. In these later years the name Temperance could still be construed to characterize the moral sensibilities of the community. While the wider world languished under an endless variety of age-old conflicts, the citizens of Temperance took comfort in the reliable concord of local life; unlike the wider world, the town was unripened by history. On the surface, the community appeared to live in an unperturbed state. Most citizens, scarcely aware of the tribal culture their immediate ancestors had displaced, held that virtue and industry had awarded them this soil. Indeed, they accepted their present circumstances as proof they dwelt at the focus of a sympathetic providence. In the common imagination, future prospects waxed as lush and green as the opulent expanses of forest which – despite recent encroachments by the burgeoning lumber industry -- swept over nearby mountain ranges. On the valley floor fragrant grasses capped the rich, alluvial soils deposited over millennia by streams and floods. Farmers had recently begun the seasonal plowing back of that verdant comforter, creating checkerboard patterns of greens and browns. In a curious reaction to all this natural fecundity, a set of railroad tracks thrust its double file through the valley’s mid-section as a kind of riposte. It was the contemptuous gesture of an encroaching industrial age. Meandering near the tracks, the Lamitam, a narrow, sometimes petulant stream, purled a simple carol to honorable work and self sufficiency. Swollen and colored by the runoff of spring rains, its turbid state resembled the fresh cider that would, at the harvest, flow from local orchards. A new, aggressive century — the Great American Century, some were predicting — seemed to be coming to its stride. It was popular to note that change was in the air. While many in the community distrusted trends emerging in the outside world, most felt compelled to give at least a nod to the notion of progress. Temperance enjoyed the era’s typical links to the spawning grounds of the new. A local newspaper and a telegraph office served the town. In numerous parlors and kitchens, editorials in regional newspapers contested the biases of rival publications. The standard magazines of the day amused with stories and summarized contemporary preoccupations. The local chapter of an eminent reading society, the Philomath Reading Circle, met bimonthly for the same purpose. Oaken telephones with jutting mouthpieces and buxom ringers channeled opinion and intrigue between a growing number of households. The first private automobile had yet to imperil the streets, but a local grocer had acquired a delivery van with a gasoline engine. Trains had bustled through the town since its founding, and while many made scheduled stops, more goods than passengers passed over the loading areas. Temperance was seldom a destination for outsiders. Front Street, the town’s commercial thoroughfare, sprawled parallel to the railroad tracks. It was surfaced with forty or fifty yards of fresh wooden planking (with ample spacing between the planks to avoid buckling after rainfall). The town had recently installed the lumber paving to insulate wheeled traffic from the plagues of mud which habitually infested the streets between October and June. Near the station, a clique of prim masonry buildings superintended the less assertive file of older wooden structures. At Fro
1368 Blue/Orange
1368 Blue/Orange
Blue and Orange make an exciting visual impact because they are on opposite sides of the color wheel. Blue and Orange squeezed right from the tube and blended with palette knife makes a wonderful, warm Brown. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- First, find the little subject you want to shoot. Choose very simple subjects like the few leaves I did here. Then walk around it looking at how the light is shining through the leaves, and looking at the background all the while. Set up your tripod, mount your camera and adjust it, right on target....focus...exposure....think. Finally, lock it down. If you have no cable release or electronic switch, merely shoot it as you would a self-portrait, use the timer. You won't need over a 5 sec delay, and you'll get no camera movement. There you have it. The blue circles in the background are fleeting glimpses of out-of-focus sky, making its way through the leaves as the breeze comes and goes. Dappled sunlight is always exciting. Shoot 20, 30 shots, at least. As the wind blows the fluttering leaves we see our background lights fluttering. Turn it into a personal photowalk. You'll have fun, and learn something at the same time. Try to learn something about photography that you did not know yesterday. I started my study in 1955, and I still learn something new each and every day.';~) -end-

opposite of brown on color wheel
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