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Cheap Modern Coffee Tables


cheap modern coffee tables
    coffee tables
  • While any small and low table can be, and is, called a coffee table, the term is applied particularly to the sets of three or four tables made from about 1790; of which the latter were called 'quartetto tables'.
  • A low table, typically placed in front of a sofa
    modern
  • A person who advocates or practices a departure from traditional styles or values
  • a contemporary person
  • a typeface (based on an 18th century design by Gianbattista Bodoni) distinguished by regular shape and hairline serifs and heavy downstrokes
  • belonging to the modern era; since the Middle Ages; "modern art"; "modern furniture"; "modern history"; "totem poles are modern rather than prehistoric"
    cheap
  • (of an item for sale) Low in price; worth more than its cost
  • bum: of very poor quality; flimsy
  • Charging low prices
  • brassy: tastelessly showy; "a flash car"; "a flashy ring"; "garish colors"; "a gaudy costume"; "loud sport shirts"; "a meretricious yet stylish book"; "tawdry ornaments"
  • relatively low in price or charging low prices; "it would have been cheap at twice the price"; "inexpensive family restaurants"
  • (of prices or other charges) Low

Ace Hotel New York
Ace Hotel New York
Ace Hotel (formerly The Hotel Breslin) 20 West 29TH Street New York, NY The work table - Ace Hotel lobby -------------------- Prior to the opening of the 269 room Ace Hotel at the corner of Broadway and 29th Street in 2009 - there was the Hotel Breslin. The Hotel Breslin was built by United States Realty & Improvement Company in 1904 on the site of the former Sturtevant House Hotel. Upon its completion, the hotel was leased to prominent New York hotelier, Colonel James H. Breslin, for whom the hotel is named. Breslin also operated the Gilsey House and the Hotel Walcott. The architectural firm Clinton & Russell designed the Beaux-arts 12-story brick and terra cotta building. The firm also designed the Hotel Astor in Times Square and the landmark Apthorp Apartments on New York's West Side. The hotel was constructed on a trapezoidal lot at an estimated cost of $1 million. The Breslin's mansard roof and corner cap were its signature attributes. Upon its opening in 1904, the Breslin was noted for its salons and cafes, and for its unusual "ladies' grill room." The property was situated in the Times Square of the turn of the century -- an area full of clubs and restaurants, and New York's first neighborhood to be electrified with lighting and signage. A block over (West 28th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenue) was Tin Pan Alley - a neighborhood flush with music publishers and songwriters that were the center of American popular music in the early 20th Century. It was thought the term Tin Pan Alley referred to the thin, tinny tone quality of cheap upright pianos used in music publisher's offices. In 1906 Clinton & Russell were commissioned to extend the hotel to the south on 29th Street. It was promised to "harmonize" the additions building materials with the old building. According to a 2001 New York Landmarks Preservation Commission Report the Hotel Breslin remains remarkably intact on the exterior above the first floor. Following Breslin's passing in 1906 he was succeeded by Walter E. Hildreth as president of the Breslin Hotel Company. Jim Breslin died of Bright's disease at his Hotel Wolcott apartment. Breslin was president of the Hotel Men's Association. Breslin's first job in the hotel industry was as a bellboy at the United States Hotel in Saratoga Springs, New York. According to the NY Times "... to have been one of Jim Breslin's employees and with a recommendation from him meant a job in any hotel in the United States and at once..." In 1911 Walter Hildreth representing Breslin Hotel Company and the United States Realty & Improvement Company sold the 400 room hotel for approximately $3,000,000 to an entity known as Hotel Operating Associates. According to the NY Times D.V. Mulligan of the Russell House Hotel, Ottawa, Canada was appointed the hotel manager. For many decades the Russell House served as Ottawa's foremost hotel. Mulligan was a well-known Canadian hotelier and he planned to focus on attracting Canadian businessmen to the Breslin. Manager Mulligan received some publicity regarding his attempts to make the Breslin a "no tipping hotel". His thought was such a policy would increase business. Mulligan fired several hat check girls who accepted tips from the patrons, but he also understood he could not dictate to his patrons how to spend their money and it was useless to prohibit employees from receiving tips. So in 1913 he implemented a policy of reducing by 10% every restaurant bill - with the hope that most patrons would accept the reduction as a notice to leave a 10% tip in cash. It is not known how long he continued reducing restaurant bills by 10%. In 1925 the Breslin Hotel was sold to Paul A. McGolrick and Sidney Claman, owner of the Times Square Hotel, purchased the Breslin in 1937. In 1955 it was sold to Max A. Goldbaum and three years later, in 1958, Goldbaum leased the hotel to the Beryl-Jason Holding Corporation. Edward Haddad, the principal with Broadway Breslin Associates, secured a 99-year lease on the Hotel Breslin in the 1950s. In time the building began to be known as the Broadway Breslin. It was known for very cheap monthly housing in a very good location. By 2006 the Breslin Apartments had degraded to a rent-stabilized single-occupancy dive. In April 2006, the hotel’s principal owner, Edward Haddad and GFI Capital Resources Group, took the first steps toward converting the shabby Breslin from an old single-room occupancy building to a luxury hotel. In 2006, GFI Real Estate Partners bought the Breslin’s lease from landlord Edward Haddad for $40 million - at the height of the market. Haddad had put little work or money into the building for several years. A joint venture partner with GFI Capital in the Ace Hotel as well as in the Standard New York in the meatpacking district is Dune Capital Management who manages a real estate opportunity fund. GFI Development secured another $35 million to finance it
Ace Hotel New York
Ace Hotel New York
Ace Hotel (formerly The Hotel Breslin) 20 West 29TH Street New York, NY The morning line-up at Ace Hotel's Stumptown Coffee Roasters. ------------- Prior to the opening of the 269 room Ace Hotel at the corner of Broadway and 29th Street in 2009 - there was the Hotel Breslin. The Hotel Breslin was built by United States Realty & Improvement Company in 1904 on the site of the former Sturtevant House Hotel. Upon its completion, the hotel was leased to prominent New York hotelier, Colonel James H. Breslin, for whom the hotel is named. Breslin also operated the Gilsey House and the Hotel Walcott. The architectural firm Clinton & Russell designed the Beaux-arts 12-story brick and terra cotta building. The firm also designed the Hotel Astor in Times Square and the landmark Apthorp Apartments on New York's West Side. The hotel was constructed on a trapezoidal lot at an estimated cost of $1 million. The Breslin's mansard roof and corner cap were its signature attributes. Upon its opening in 1904, the Breslin was noted for its salons and cafes, and for its unusual "ladies' grill room." The property was situated in the Times Square of the turn of the century -- an area full of clubs and restaurants, and New York's first neighborhood to be electrified with lighting and signage. A block over (West 28th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenue) was Tin Pan Alley - a neighborhood flush with music publishers and songwriters that were the center of American popular music in the early 20th Century. It was thought the term Tin Pan Alley referred to the thin, tinny tone quality of cheap upright pianos used in music publisher's offices. In 1906 Clinton & Russell were commissioned to extend the hotel to the south on 29th Street. It was promised to "harmonize" the additions building materials with the old building. According to a 2001 New York Landmarks Preservation Commission Report the Hotel Breslin remains remarkably intact on the exterior above the first floor. Following Breslin's passing in 1906 he was succeeded by Walter E. Hildreth as president of the Breslin Hotel Company. Jim Breslin died of Bright's disease at his Hotel Wolcott apartment. Breslin was president of the Hotel Men's Association. Breslin's first job in the hotel industry was as a bellboy at the United States Hotel in Saratoga Springs, New York. According to the NY Times "... to have been one of Jim Breslin's employees and with a recommendation from him meant a job in any hotel in the United States and at once..." In 1911 Walter Hildreth representing Breslin Hotel Company and the United States Realty & Improvement Company sold the 400 room hotel for approximately $3,000,000 to an entity known as Hotel Operating Associates. According to the NY Times D.V. Mulligan of the Russell House Hotel, Ottawa, Canada was appointed the hotel manager. For many decades the Russell House served as Ottawa's foremost hotel. Mulligan was a well-known Canadian hotelier and he planned to focus on attracting Canadian businessmen to the Breslin. Manager Mulligan received some publicity regarding his attempts to make the Breslin a "no tipping hotel". His thought was such a policy would increase business. Mulligan fired several hat check girls who accepted tips from the patrons, but he also understood he could not dictate to his patrons how to spend their money and it was useless to prohibit employees from receiving tips. So in 1913 he implemented a policy of reducing by 10% every restaurant bill - with the hope that most patrons would accept the reduction as a notice to leave a 10% tip in cash. It is not known how long he continued reducing restaurant bills by 10%. In 1925 the Breslin Hotel was sold to Paul A. McGolrick and Sidney Claman, owner of the Times Square Hotel, purchased the Breslin in 1937. In 1955 it was sold to Max A. Goldbaum and three years later, in 1958, Goldbaum leased the hotel to the Beryl-Jason Holding Corporation. Edward Haddad, the principal with Broadway Breslin Associates, secured a 99-year lease on the Hotel Breslin in the 1950s. In time the building began to be known as the Broadway Breslin. It was known for very cheap monthly housing in a very good location. By 2006 the Breslin Apartments had degraded to a rent-stabilized single-occupancy dive. In April 2006, the hotel’s principal owner, Edward Haddad and GFI Capital Resources Group, took the first steps toward converting the shabby Breslin from an old single-room occupancy building to a luxury hotel. In 2006, GFI Real Estate Partners bought the Breslin’s lease from landlord Edward Haddad for $40 million - at the height of the market. Haddad had put little work or money into the building for several years. A joint venture partner with GFI Capital in the Ace Hotel as well as in the Standard New York in the meatpacking district is Dune Capital Management who manages a real estate opportunity fund. GFI Development secured another $35

cheap modern coffee tables
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