GUN CLEANING RUST. GUN CLEANING

GUN CLEANING RUST. NIECY FROM CLEAN HOUSE

Gun Cleaning Rust


gun cleaning rust
    cleaning
  • Remove the innards of (fish or poultry) prior to cooking
  • Make (something or someone) free of dirt, marks, or mess, esp. by washing, wiping, or brushing
  • (clean) free from dirt or impurities; or having clean habits; "children with clean shining faces"; "clean white shirts"; "clean dishes"; "a spotlessly clean house"; "cats are clean animals"
  • make clean by removing dirt, filth, or unwanted substances from; "Clean the stove!"; "The dentist cleaned my teeth"
  • the act of making something clean; "he gave his shoes a good cleaning"
    rust
  • of the brown color of rust
  • a red or brown oxide coating on iron or steel caused by the action of oxygen and moisture
  • corrode: become destroyed by water, air, or a corrosive such as an acid; "The metal corroded"; "The pipes rusted"
  • A state of deterioration or disrepair resulting from neglect or lack of use
  • A fungal disease of plants that results in reddish or brownish patches
  • A reddish- or yellowish-brown flaky coating of iron oxide that is formed on iron or steel by oxidation, esp. in the presence of moisture
    gun
  • A device for discharging something (e.g., insecticide, grease, or electrons) in a required direction
  • A gunman
  • A weapon incorporating a metal tube from which bullets, shells, or other missiles are propelled by explosive force, typically making a characteristic loud, sharp noise
  • shoot with a gun
  • a weapon that discharges a missile at high velocity (especially from a metal tube or barrel)
  • artillery: large but transportable armament
gun cleaning rust - Gunslick Ultra-Lube
Gunslick Ultra-Lube Gun Oil (5-Ounce Aerosol)
Gunslick Ultra-Lube Gun Oil (5-Ounce Aerosol)
Gunslick Ultra-Lube's advanced formula is the ultimate in lubrication technology. It bonds to metal surfaces for superior lubricity, and offers layers of powerful protection against corrosion. Be ready for action. Keep those moving parts working smoothly and rust free. Provide the best care for your favorite firearm with our advanced lubricants and oils. Choose Gunslick Pro when you demand powerful protection. In the gun care industry - among gunsmiths, firearm technicians and shooters - Gunslick has earned a sterling reputation for providing precision products that serve the active shooter. Third party testing shows Gunslick products exceed the performance of their competition in both corrosion protection and wear reduction. These test also demonstrate Gunslick's unwavering dedication to producing technologically advanced gun care products for today's shooters. This season, let Gunslick Pro do the work for you. Select a product and see how Gunslick hasn't sacrificed the ability to perform when simplifying the process. Our Promise: Gunslick Pro's superior chemicals are scientifically tested to provide the best gun care possible. We guarantee the performance of our chemicals and back each one with a no questions asked money-back guarantee.

80% (18)
Gun Bluing a bike frame
Gun Bluing a bike frame
I'm finishing a bike frame using Birchwood-Casey Perma Blue - Liquid Gun Blue. It gives a deep blue/black finish that lets some of the qualities of the raw metal shine through. Step 5 - Rinse with soapy water and dry thoroughly. Blued steel plus a gun oil is fairly weather resistant, but you would have to be vigilant about reapplying oil regularly. I'm going to give this frame a clear powder coating. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Update: Oct. 16, 2011 I gave this advice to a Flickr user who asked about using Gun Blue on a bike frame. I thought it might be helpful to others considering this finish: I think gun bluing if a great way to approach frame finishing, but in my particular case things worked out poorly. I used a newbie powder coater who offered me a good price to apply the clear. I think he made a bad choice on which powder to use--like he went with one that is normally a top coat and is insufficiently tough enough to be a single coat. Long story short I got rust ... Bad. After commuting in snowy conditions a couple times the salt slag somehow got under the coat and the rust spread around the BB like a disease. Now I'm having the frame recoated in a solid color by a good and recommended coater. He told me that the rust wasn't a product of the bluing -- it should have worked well if the original coater had done a better job. As for bluing tips: I was bluing a completely stripped frame that was cleaned up with a fine rotary wire brush drill attachment. I went over the frame with a very hi grit sandpaper -- like 800 -- and steel wool. When applying the blueing agent, work from the bottom up - seems counter intuitive but this minimizes the effect of drips. If drips run down the raw unfinished steel they will appear darker when you hit up that section with its own layer of blue. If your working from the bottom up the drips only hit finished areas. Be quick with a rag to wipe them up and the won't leave a mark. Do one full tube at a time -- that's a larger area than the Bluing box recommends but just work quickly to get it on evenly as fast as possible. Overlap can leave uneven darkness, so you don't want to have two work sections joining mid-tube. Wipe the blue on in long tube length swipes that end at the welds or lugs. Might consider using something larger than the swab they provide to get it on faster. A small sponge maybe. Also, that stuff works fast so you can pretty much start cleaning it from the first area you swiped as soon as you finish the last swipe. Better to keep it light and hit it up again than let it sit and get irrevocably dark. Note to anyone considering applying clear powder coating to a bike frame, gun blued or not: The heat of powder coating darkens raw steel. With one bike I coated clear, I hoped to preserve to look of cold raw steel, but it yellowed when it was coated... it didn't look bad--sort of made it look brassy-- but it's safe to say that you shouldn't expect the clear-coated frame to look exactly the same as id did pre-coating. In the case of this frame, the blue got darker too. Mine even took on a reddish hue behind the blue that was unexpected but, in a way, richer and awesome. Because of this darkening, you might want to leave it a little lighter than you want the finished frame to be. That will also help the texture of thebrushed steel to come through. Too dark and it will just look black after coating. Last, keep it in a dry area until you are ready to coat. Bluing doesn't do much to ward off rust, and if it does rust you will be in a jam because you can't knock back the rust without removing the finish. I experimented with adding gun oil to keep the frame rust free until I got it to the coater. I think this was a mistake because the oil is the enemy of powder coating. It had to be fired off before the frame could be coated - this can change the tint. And it may have been remnant oil creating voids between the coating and tubing that led to my rust down the line. Regardless, your coater should treat the frame with an astringent to get all hand oils off the frame prior to coating. Despite the failure of this frame I will definitely try this on future frames. When done well, it can be awesome. Next time I'm just going to be very upfront with the coater that I want a bombproof clear - possibly too coats if that can be done without too much discoloration.
Gun Bluing a bike frame
Gun Bluing a bike frame
I'm finishing a bike frame using Birchwood-Casey Perma Blue - Liquid Gun Blue. It gives a deep blue/black finish that lets some of the qualities of the raw metal shine through. Step 2 - Remove all oils, fingerprints, spittle, snot with several thorough passes of dishsoap and water or your degreaser of choice. Dry thoroughly. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Update: Oct. 16, 2011 I gave this advice to a Flickr user who asked about using Gun Blue on a bike frame. I thought it might be helpful to others considering this finish: I think gun bluing if a great way to approach frame finishing, but in my particular case things worked out poorly. I used a newbie powder coater who offered me a good price to apply the clear. I think he made a bad choice on which powder to use--like he went with one that is normally a top coat and is insufficiently tough enough to be a single coat. Long story short I got rust ... Bad. After commuting in snowy conditions a couple times the salt slag somehow got under the coat and the rust spread around the BB like a disease. Now I'm having the frame recoated in a solid color by a good and recommended coater. He told me that the rust wasn't a product of the bluing -- it should have worked well if the original coater had done a better job. As for bluing tips: I was bluing a completely stripped frame that was cleaned up with a fine rotary wire brush drill attachment. I went over the frame with a very hi grit sandpaper -- like 800 -- and steel wool. When applying the blueing agent, work from the bottom up - seems counter intuitive but this minimizes the effect of drips. If drips run down the raw unfinished steel they will appear darker when you hit up that section with its own layer of blue. If your working from the bottom up the drips only hit finished areas. Be quick with a rag to wipe them up and the won't leave a mark. Do one full tube at a time -- that's a larger area than the Bluing box recommends but just work quickly to get it on evenly as fast as possible. Overlap can leave uneven darkness, so you don't want to have two work sections joining mid-tube. Wipe the blue on in long tube length swipes that end at the welds or lugs. Might consider using something larger than the swab they provide to get it on faster. A small sponge maybe. Also, that stuff works fast so you can pretty much start cleaning it from the first area you swiped as soon as you finish the last swipe. Better to keep it light and hit it up again than let it sit and get irrevocably dark. Note to anyone considering applying clear powder coating to a bike frame, gun blued or not: The heat of powder coating darkens raw steel. With one bike I coated clear, I hoped to preserve to look of cold raw steel, but it yellowed when it was coated... it didn't look bad--sort of made it look brassy-- but it's safe to say that you shouldn't expect the clear-coated frame to look exactly the same as id did pre-coating. In the case of this frame, the blue got darker too. Mine even took on a reddish hue behind the blue that was unexpected but, in a way, richer and awesome. Because of this darkening, you might want to leave it a little lighter than you want the finished frame to be. That will also help the texture of thebrushed steel to come through. Too dark and it will just look black after coating. Last, keep it in a dry area until you are ready to coat. Bluing doesn't do much to ward off rust, and if it does rust you will be in a jam because you can't knock back the rust without removing the finish. I experimented with adding gun oil to keep the frame rust free until I got it to the coater. I think this was a mistake because the oil is the enemy of powder coating. It had to be fired off before the frame could be coated - this can change the tint. And it may have been remnant oil creating voids between the coating and tubing that led to my rust down the line. Regardless, your coater should treat the frame with an astringent to get all hand oils off the frame prior to coating. Despite the failure of this frame I will definitely try this on future frames. When done well, it can be awesome. Next time I'm just going to be very upfront with the coater that I want a bombproof clear - possibly too coats if that can be done without too much discoloration.

gun cleaning rust
See also:








Comments