BUILDING A PUB TABLE - BUILDING A

Building a pub table - Chrome coffee table legs - Custom glass dining table.

Building A Pub Table


building a pub table
    pub table
  • Any table that is 42" High (Standard Table height is 30")
    building
  • The process or business of constructing something
  • construction: the act of constructing something; "during the construction we had to take a detour"; "his hobby was the building of boats"
  • a structure that has a roof and walls and stands more or less permanently in one place; "there was a three-story building on the corner"; "it was an imposing edifice"
  • The process of commissioning, financing, or overseeing the construction of something
  • the occupants of a building; "the entire building complained about the noise"
  • A structure with a roof and walls, such as a house, school, store, or factory
building a pub table - Bar Table
Bar Table In 50's Retro Nostalgic Soda Fountain Style With Chrome Plating and Black Wooden Top
Bar Table In 50's Retro Nostalgic Soda Fountain Style With Chrome Plating and Black Wooden Top
This is a brand new in box Bar Table in 50's Retro Nostalgic Soda Fountain Style with Chrome Plating and Black Table Top. This item is modeled after the famous style of the American 1950's Diner that has served so many back in the days. The tubular steel frame of the item is plated with chrome and constructed with quality. Table top is MDF covered in veneer. Its smooth, strong, and durable surfaces makes it easy to clean and hassle free. (Requires Simple Assembly) Dimensions Measure:30" Diameter x 41 3/4"H

82% (5)
Dinner tables
Dinner tables
Dinner table for inhabitants of the reeducation colony. All pictures were taken in Veenhuizen, a small village with about 800 inhabitants in the province of Drenthe in the north-east of the Netherlands. What makes Veenhuizen special is that it started out in the early nineteenth century as a reeducation colony for the poor and homeless. The history of Veenhuizen actually goes back to the late Middle Ages, but only as an insignificant hamlet alongside a little stream called the "Slokkert". This was situated a little to the north of the current village. Change came when the Major General Johannes van den Bosch started the Maatschappij van Weldadigheid (Society of Humanitarianism) in the 1820s. The society bought 30 km? of land to found colonies which would house and provide work for the poor and homeless. The change is still evident in the way the village was set up. It looks, when seen through Dutch eyes, almost American as it is made up of roads in a grid pattern with blocks measuring 700 by 700 metres. The difference with the United States is that most of these blocks are still filled in with farmland on which the inmates used to work. The houses (of the staff) are concentrated around the remaining prison complexes. A large number of which have educational texts in large sculptured sills on the front, about two stories high to educate the people working in and around them. The texts used to correspond with the intended inhabitant. For example, the headmasters house said "Kennis is Macht" (Knowledge is Power) and the pharmacists house said "Bitter en Zoet" (Bitter and Sweet). Later in the 19th century the Maatschappij van Weldadigheid went broke and the whole complex/village was taken over by the Department of Justice for use as a penal colony. This led to the building of the prison buildings which are still in use today (albeit modernized several times since). Veenhuizen used to be closed off to everyone but the inmates and the staff. The staffs families lived in housing (most now newly built in the 70s, 80s and 90s) provided by the department. The village was treated as private companies grounds which also meant that (ironically) the police had no jurisdiction there, much to the liking of the moped riding youth. Since 1990 the village is freely accessible for all and even houses a tea-garden, a pub (for the very first time in its existence) and the "Gevangenismuseum" (prison museum). The whole village will be nominated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in the near future.
Bristol Flickr Group - Pub Quiz
Bristol Flickr Group - Pub Quiz
Here are two long exposure group shots taken at the end of a Flickr Bristol Group pub quiz. The shots were taken on my Holga120N using the remote shutter release and Bulb mods to ensure a decent exposure. I sat the camera on the table and leaned over it from the side looking through the viewfinder upside down to try and frame it up. The pub was very dark and that coupled with the Holga's lowest aperture of f8 was going to make things... Difficult. Thankfully modern technology is useful for something and with a little help from rabidbee's "lightmeter" camera I worked out a rough exposure time of around 30 secs (I think, can't remember and didn't write it down). Anyway, one shot was done at the camera's suggested exposure and the second was held open about another 5-10 seconds. I don't know which is which as they both look about the same and I can't be bothered looking for the negatives now they're stored away in my book.

building a pub table
building a pub table
Classic Carved Furniture: Making a Piecrust Tea Table : A Step-By-Step Guide to Creating an American Classic (A Schiffer Book for Woodcarvers)
Following upon the success of their first book, The Queen Anne Stool, Tom Heller and Ron Clarkson decided to offer a book about building one of the most desirable pieces of American furniture: the piecrust tea table. This tilting top table has the high elegance of eighteenth century design. The top has a beautifully sculpted molding, resting upon an open-styled birdcage. This rotates on a finely contoured and turned pillar adorned at the vase with acanthus leaves, balancing on a delicate ring of pearls which end in a ribbon and flower design. The cabriole legs are adorned with acanthus leaves at the knees and end in a strongly taloned ball and claw foot. Every step, from cutting and turning to carving and finishing, is explained in step-by-step photographs. These are accompanied with by concise descriptions of the techniques involved. While requiring some basic woodworking skills, this book is designed for cabinet makers and carvers of all levels of experience, so they may produce this treasure of furniture for themselves.

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