COMMERCIAL FOLDING TABLES - COMMERCIAL FOLDING

Commercial folding tables - Tempered glass table top - Dining table glass cover.

Commercial Folding Tables


commercial folding tables
    folding tables
  • A trestle table is an item of furniture comprising two or three trestle supports linked by a longitudinal cross-member over which a board or tabletop is placed.
    commercial
  • Concerned with or engaged in commerce
  • connected with or engaged in or sponsored by or used in commerce or commercial enterprises; "commercial trucker"; "commercial TV"; "commercial diamonds"
  • Making or intended to make a profit
  • The typographic character @, called the at sign or at symbol, is an abbreviation of the word at or the phrase at the rate of in accounting and commercial invoices (e.g. "7 widgets @ $2 = $14"). Its most common modern use is in e-mail addresses, where it stands for "located at".
  • a commercially sponsored ad on radio or television
  • Having profit, rather than artistic or other value, as a primary aim
commercial folding tables - Lifetime 6
Lifetime 6 Foot Residential Fold-In-Half Utility Table, White Granite # 80216
Lifetime 6 Foot Residential Fold-In-Half  Utility Table, White Granite # 80216
Lifetime 6-Foot Residential Adjustable Fold-In-Half Table - Features a 60 by 24-Inch molded tabletop (white granite) with a round folding frame (gray). No matter where your hobbies take you, the Lifetime 6 ft Adjustable Fold-in-Half Table is the perfect companion. From crafty creations at home to painting in a natural outdoor setting, this portable craft table is ready to go where you go. The table is designed with three different height settings to accommodate your various needs and projects, and a stain-resistant surface so it's easy to clean. When you've finished your masterpiece, simply fold up your portable craft table and store it until your next burst of inspiration.

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Trinity Building
Trinity Building
Financial District, Downtown Manhattan, New York City, United States of America The Trinity Building, designed by Francis Hatch Kimball and built in 1905, with an addition of 1907, is among the first Gothic-inspired skyscrapers in New York. Kimball's sensitive adaptation of this historical style establishes a sympathetic relationship between the skyscraper and its early Gothic Revival neighbor, Trinity Church and Churchyard. An entirely freestanding, steel-framed structure, the Trinity Building anticipates the skyscraper "cathedral" tower type which emerged just a few years later—of which the Wool worth Building is the most notable example. The spire of Trinity Church, the picturesque roof lines of the Trinity Building, its companion, the U.S. Realty Building, and the Woolworth Building tower form a romantic ensemble and create a striking, Gothic silhouette on Lower Broadway. Kimball, who had worked with the English Victorian Gothicist William Burges, had won acclaim as a designer of theaters and churches before receiving several important skyscraper commissions at the turn of the century; these tall buildings are known for their important innovations in the technology of caisson foundations. His strong predilection for Gothic design and his engineering expertise made Kimball the ideal architect for the Trinity Building commission. Development of Lower Manhattan Since the seventeenth century, Lower Manhattan has been New York's center of commerce and finance. By the last decades of the nineteenth century, many major American businesses had established headquarters there, and by the early twentieth century, the skyline of Lower Manhattan had been dramatically transformed as the early skyscrapers appeared. The advancement of elevator technology and new developments in structural engineering allowed architects to construct tall, spacious, and efficient office buildings, suited to the narrow sites of the island. In the 1880s and 1890s, Broadway became the main artery of the district.*^ Insurance companies, conscious of their public images, were among the first to erect structures celebrating their wealth and prosperity. In 1898, the five boroughs were consolidated into Greater New York, awakening a strong awareness of the city's history and a sense of civic pride on the part of the general public. At this time, there was also a growing mistrust of monopolies and big business practices were severely criticized. Large corporations attempted to counter such sentiments by erecting buildings that would give an impression of not merely financial stability but of trustworthiness, tradition, and integrity, in order to imply that big business served the needs of the public. As this new building type emerged, so did the need for appropriate stylistic and compositional expression. Architects found solutions in a variety of historical styles, but "none was more pervasive than classicism. The classical, tripartite division of the elevation into a base, a shaft, and a capital was widely accepted, in part because it could accommodate the large proportions of skyscrapers; the neo-Classical style was commonly employed for civic architecture, thus providing, by association, a positive image for the corporation The Neo-Gothic ,Style Although the Gothic Revival was influential in the United States during the nineteenth century, the style was rarely employed for commercial architecture and early skyscraper designs. Contemporary architectural criticism focused on the notion that no single historical style could accommodate the variety of building types demanded by modem life, and until "a distinct system of architectural forms appropriate to our age and civilization" was found, historical styles should co-exist. Despite the acceptance of stylistic variation, Gothic was generally not considered to be relevant to the design of office buildings, prior to the erection of the Woolworth Building, (Cass Gilbert, 1911-13, a designated New York City Landmark). Although few, the early, Gothic-inspired skyscrapers were massive, stylistically innovative structures which proved to have a great impact on Manhattan's skyline. In addition to the Trinity and U.S. Realty Buildings, ether outstanding examples of Neo-Gothic skyscraper design are Gilbert's West Street Building, (1905); Kimball's enormous City Investing Building, (1908, demolished); and the Liberty Tower by Henry Ives Cobb, (1909, a designated New York City Landmark). The subjective connotations of the Gothic style—spirituality, scholasticism, fraternity, craftsmanship—seem to have little to do with an architecture of capitalism. As the "Commercial Gothic" developed, however, critics made formal, stylistic comparisons between the verticality and thrust of Gothic cathedrals, (particularly their spires), and skyscrapers. Due to their location next to the early Gothic Revival Trinity Church, a sense of place and the picturesque qualities of th
U. S. Realty Building
U. S. Realty Building
Financial District, Downtown Manhattan, New York City, United States of America The U.S. Realty Building, designed by Francis Hatch Kimball and built in 1907, is among the first Gothic-inspired skyscrapers in New York. Kimball's sensitive adaptation of this historical style established a sympathetic relationship between the earlier Trinity Building and its neighbor, Trinity Church, which is continued in the design of the U.S. Realty Building. An entirely freestanding, steel-framed structure, the U.S. Realty Building, like its near twin, the Trinity Building, anticipates the skyscraper "cathedral" tower type which emerged a few years later—of which the Wool worth Building is the most notable example. The spire of Trinity (hurch, the picturesque rooflines of the Trinity and U.S. Realty Buildings, and the Wool worth Building twer form a romantic ensemble and create a striking, Gothic silhouette on Lower Broadway. Kimball, who had worked with the English Victorian Gothicist William Burges, had won acclaim as a designer of theaters and churches before receiving several important skyscraper commissions at the turn of the century; these tall buildings are known for their important innovations in the technology of caisson foundations. His strong predilection for Gothic design and his engineering expertise made Kimball the ideal architect of for the U.S. Realty Building commission. Development of Lower Manhattan Since the seventeenth century, Lower Manhattan has been New York's center of commerce and finance. By the last decades of the nineteenth century, many major American businesses had established headquarters there, and by the early twentieth century, the skyline of lower Manhattan had been dramatically transformed as the early skyscrapers appeared. The advancement of elevator technology and new developments in structural engineering allowed architects to construct tall, spacious, and efficient office buildings, suited to the narrow sites of the island. In the 1880s and 1890s, Broadway became the main artery of the district. Insurance companies, conscious of their public images, were among the first to erect structures celebrating their wealth and prosperity. In 1898, the five boroughs were consolidated into Greater New York, awakening a strong awareness of the city's history and a sense of civic pride on the part of the general public. At this time, there was also a growing mistrust of monopolies and big business practices were severely criticized. Large corporations attempted to counter such sentiments by erecting buildings that would give an impression of not merely financial stability but of trustworthiness, tradition, and integrity, in order to imply that big business served the needs of the public. As this new building type emerged, so did the need for appropriate stylistic and compositional expression. Architects found solutions in a variety of historical styles, but none was more pervasive than classicism. The classical, tripartite division of the elevation into a base, a shaft, and a capital was widely accepted, in part because it could accommodate the large proportions of skyscrapers; the neo-Classical style was commonly employed for civic architecture, thus providing, by association, a positive image for the corporation. The Neo-Gothic Style Although the Gothic Revival was influential in the United States during the nineteenth century, the style was rarely employed for commercial architecture and early skyscraper designs. Contemporary architectural criticism focused on the notion that no single historical style could accommodate the variety of building types demanded by modem life, and until "a distinct system of architectural forms appropriate to our age and civilization" was found, historical styles should co-exist. Despite the acceptance of stylistic variation, Gothic was generally not considered to be relevant to the design of office buildings, prior to the erection of the Woolworth Building, (Cass Gilbert, 1911-13, a designated New York City Landmark). Although few, the early, Gothic-inspired skyscrapers were massive, stylistically innovative structures which proved to have a great impact on Manhattan's skyline. In addition to the Trinity and U.S. Realty Buildings, other outstanding examples of Neo-Gothic skyscraper design are Gilbert's West Street Building, (1905); Kimball's enormous City Investing Building, (1908, demolished); and the Liberty Tower by Henry Ives Cobb, (1909, a designated New York City landmark). The subjective connotations of the Gothic style—spirituality, scholasticism, fraternity, craftsmanship—seem to have little to do with an architecture of capitalism. As the "Commercial Gothic" developed, however, critics made formal, stylistic comparisons between the verticality and thrust of Gothic cathedrals, (particularly their spires), and skyscrapers. Due to their location next to Trinity Church, a sense of place and the picturesque qualiti

commercial folding tables
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