BIKE INSURANCE GROUPS : INSURANCE GROUPS

Bike insurance groups : Gt moutain bikes : Trek antelope 800 bike.

Bike Insurance Groups


bike insurance groups
    insurance groups
  • (Insurance group) In law and economics, insurance is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent, uncertain loss. Insurance is defined as the equitable transfer of the risk of a loss, from one entity to another, in exchange for payment.
  • (Insurance Group) Insurance groups assess the risk of particular vehicles. Numbered from 1-20 with higher risk vehicles, such as Ferrari's, belonging to Group 20.
    bike
  • A bicycle or motorcycle
  • bicycle: a wheeled vehicle that has two wheels and is moved by foot pedals
  • motorcycle: a motor vehicle with two wheels and a strong frame
  • bicycle: ride a bicycle
bike insurance groups - Adkisson's Captive
Adkisson's Captive Insurance Companies: An Introduction to Captives, Closely-Held Insurance Companies, and Risk Retention Groups
Adkisson's Captive Insurance Companies: An Introduction to Captives, Closely-Held Insurance Companies, and Risk Retention Groups
A captive insurance company is, in a nutshell, an insurance company formed by a business owner to insure the risks of the operating business. The operating business pays premiums to the captive, and the captive insures the risks of the operating business. A captive is much more than an exotic form of self-insurance: It is the creation of a new insurance company that has the potential to grow from being a mere captive into a full-blown insurance company seeking to profit from underwriting the risks of others. Adkisson’s Captive Insurance Companies provides a basic introduction to captives and their benefits, including: utilize your own experience ratings; recapture underwriting profits; underwrite exposed risks and deductibles; access the reinsurance markets; and transfer wealth between generations. This book also provides a unique look at the wealth transfer, accumulation and preservation advantages of captives, as well as an overview of the types of captives, taxation of captives, and captive domiciles.

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Oak Bay Crit 1305200970 004
Oak Bay Crit 1305200970 004
Bike racing is a big sport in Greater Victoria. Participation has grown and diversified over the several decades that I have been involved in or have been observing in Greater Victoria. A snapshot in time here in Oak Bay, Victoria's tony suburb, where a short, flat circuit closes roads for a quiet Sunday morning and gives them to the faster crowd. This shot is useful in illustrating an often important pattern of bicycle racing in progress. The night before posting this pic is a case in point. My first connection with bike racing in Victoria came in the 1970s, and the local road club, where just about everyone who raced knew one another through a single club. There were a dozen or two race courses around the region - roads quiet enough and race groups often small enough to cause little traffic disruption or citizen consternation across the many communities involved in Victoria's capital region. In recent years, the numbers of riders have exploded, built on not just the immediate past interest in racing and the exploits of high level athletes, but built over decades of diversification through the BMX and mountain bike eras, the growth of triathlon, the adoption of cycling as a mainstream leisure and vacation activity, as well as its adoption as an important mode of transport. The growth in cycling groups from shop teams and their club rides, through Triathlon and event cycling (Cops for Cancer, the MS Bike Tour, Gran Fondo and Randonee events), coupled with a growth in population, not just in people, but more perversely in the number, size and speed of vehicles on our roads, continues to make cycling for sport and leisure a bigger challenge. Events require insurance and a diversity of course to meet a demand for more and more events while residents chafe at closures or controls and everpresent "scofflaw" cyclists who may impede them on the roads where drivers are often oblivious to the routine violation of speed limits and other "minor" offenses that reflect the narrow perspectives of the beholder. Going to municipal councils and local police forces to secure permissions for events can by trying, and those unfamiliar with bicycle as a sport, let alone transportation, often have little understanding and less patience for the activity. Roads are designed for cars, not necessarily well enough for bikes, though racing can, and should be done more so on roadways away from more leisurely trail corridors. Race speeds in any event may average 35 to 45 km/h or more, and traffic is little impeded in circumstances where drivers and cyclists share well designed roads. Closed course where speeds may be even higher are essential for short cirucuit events, less so for longer road races from point to point or on longer, more challenging loops. This image illustrates well enough how road race groups may string out, though paradoxically, it is more typical of early stages of a short circuit course like this one to see more bunched up, across the road packs. As speeds increase, the swift percolate to the front and slower riders will drift back. Everyone normally takes turns within parameters of group dynamics with race leaders sharing pace making turns near the front and posers like me hanging in somewhere down the food chain, taking as few turns as possible. The pattern when well observed and understood, counters the oft heard complaint the cyclists take up too much of the road. They will not likely be in strict single file, as presecribed by law, itself an anachronism that needs fixing. In race or training situations, single file is safe for no one and is more, not less likely to impede traffic. More can be found in other photos elsewhere on the site, where bits and pieces of race imagery can be found among the advocacy shots. This one was used to support a presentation to a local, rural municipal council where there is an interest in improving a road circuit - a 9km loop with some good, if short, stiff climbs to sort out the pack. For those that want to insist that racing will obstruct traffic, the image belies the complaint, showing that often enough, a fast pack, (and one that is at or approaching the speed limit anyway - and exceeding it on descents), is, as a group well designed and reasonably well behaved. Drivers can adapt with patience and a responsible approach to sharing the road. With respect to other issues, there is much value in event tourism, community benefits in promoting healthy sport, and a variety of other returns on growing and supporting a diversity of cycling acitivity, including road racing, in one's community.
Toonie Race/Ride - June 10 2010 - Whistler - Canada
Toonie Race/Ride - June 10 2010 - Whistler - Canada
Toonie Rides Every week for 20 weeks, WORCA hosts Thursday night Toonie Rides with the sponsorship of local businesses and organizations. The Toonie part of the name change is simple. The rides cost $2 with half of your entry fee will going into WORCA’s trail maintenance fund, and the other half into a pot for the top riders — usually locals who are training for the nationals or even the World Cup, so they can use every cent they get. The Ride part of the name is more about our mandate, which is to foster the use of bicycles in the community. There are a core group of ’racers’ in our series and we do reward 1st, 2nd and 3rd place but the majority of riders are just out to have fun, explore the trails, get a bit of exercise, and socialize with members of the coolest club in town. To truely understand what Toonies are all about, read WORCA past president Todd Hellinga’s story here. You need to be a WORCA member to participate for insurance reasons, but every cent that doesn’t go to the insurance companies is channeled back into protecting and maintaining Whistler’s exceptional network of bike trails — the sames ones you’ll be riding in weekly Toonie races. The races are open to everyone, young and old, and of all abilities. All participants must wear a helmet and ensure that their bikes are in good working order. Bring water, tube repair kits, and tools because you never know. See you at the finish line!

bike insurance groups
bike insurance groups
Group Insurance (ACTEX Professional Series)
This text is a comprehensive treatment of all aspects of group insurance in the United States and Canada, both life and health, with emphasis on the actuarial aspects of this important field of insurance. The Fifth Edition has been updated for the industry and regulatory changes which have occurred since 2003. Of particular note is a new chapter addressing medicare related coverages. This text is listed on the Course of Reading for SOA fellowship study in the Group Insurance specialty, and the Fundamentals of Actuarial Practice Course of the Society of Actuaries.

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