LEWIS WOOD END TABLE - LEWIS WOOD

Lewis wood end table - Etched glass table.

Lewis Wood End Table


lewis wood end table
    end table
  • A table is a type of furniture comprising an open, flat surface supported by a base or legs. It may be used to hold articles such as food or papers at a convenient or comfortable height when sitting, and is therefore often used in conjunction with chairs.
  • (End tables) are small tables typically placed beside couches or armchairs. Often lamps will be placed on an end table.
  • (End tables) Usually bought in pairs, they accent the style of the coffee table or other furniture. Usually placed at the end of the sofa, it is a very important piece of a living room set.
    lewis
  • A steel device for gripping heavy blocks of stone or concrete for lifting, consisting of three pieces arranged to form a dovetail, the outside pieces being fixed in a dovetail mortise by the insertion of the middle piece
  • United States athlete who won gold medals at the Olympics for his skill in sprinting and jumping (born in 1961)
  • United States explorer and soldier who lead led an expedition from St. Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River (1774-1809)
  • United States rock star singer and pianist (born in 1935)
    wood
  • A golf club with a wooden or other head that is relatively broad from face to back (often with a numeral indicating the degree to which the face is angled to loft the ball)
  • the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
  • United States film actress (1938-1981)
  • Such material when cut and used as timber or fuel
  • The hard fibrous material that forms the main substance of the trunk or branches of a tree or shrub
  • forest: the trees and other plants in a large densely wooded area
lewis wood end table - Ashley T309-13
Ashley T309-13 lewis "3-in-1" Pack Occasional Tables
Ashley T309-13 lewis "3-in-1" Pack Occasional Tables
Ashely Furniture Lewis 3-in-1 Pack Occasional Table Set T309-13. The straight-lined contemporary design of the Lewis 3-in-1 Pack Occasional Table Set by Ashley Furniture from the "Lewis" accent table collection features a rich finish and stylish detailing to create an exciting collection that is sure to enhance the look of any living room decor. The medium brown finish flows smoothly over the straight legs and etched table top details to bring out the unique beauty of this contemporary collection. With ample table top space and plank style lower shelves, these tables are an exceptional addition to any home environment. Enhance your home's style with the rich contemporary flavor of the "Lewis" Accent Table Collection. Series No: T309 Name: Lewis Style: Contemporary Colors: Brown Features: Medium brown finish. Made with select veneers and hardwood solids. Plank design lower shelf. Dimensions: Coffee Table 46"W x 23"D x 18"H COCKTAIL TABLE SHELF 39 5/8" x 10 1/2" x 3/4" FROM COCKTAIL TABLE SHELF TO APRON 9 7/8" End Table 21"W x 23"D x 21"H END TABLE SHELF 16 3/4" x 10 3/8" x 3/4" FROM END TABLE SHELF TO APRON 8 5/8" Some assembly may be required.

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St. Peter's Church from Westchester Square Subway platform
St. Peter's Church from Westchester Square Subway platform
Westchester Square, Bronx St. Peter's Church, Chapel, and Cemetery form a pleasant and charming enclave in the heart of the old town of Westchester in the Bronx, formerly part of Westchester County. The two strikingly picturesque Gothic style buildings in their quiet graveyard setting dominate the neighborhood and are a tangible reminder of the rural past of this section of the Bronx. The county of Westchester was formed in 1683 and the borough-town of Westchester was named the county seat. St. Peter's Chapel now occupies the site of the old courthouse. In 1788 the state legislature decreed that all counties were to be divided into townships, and the town of Westchester became one of the twenty-one townships of Westchester County. The parish of St. Peter's, one of the oldest in New York City, was organized in 1693 following an act of the Colonial Assembly "for settling a ministry and raising a maintenance for them in the County of Westchester." It was not until 17C0 that the town meeting house, previously used for religious services, was abandoned, and a church was erected. This first edifice, built of wood, was quadrangular in form with a pyramidal roof, in the center of which was a bell turret. The bell, presented to the church by the Morris family, bore the inscription "Lewis Morris, 1677." The church was situated on the town green adjoining the county court house and jail, the same site as that of the present structure. Building expenses were defrayed by a tax levied on all inhabitants of the townships of Westchester, Eastchester, Yonkers, and the manor of Pelham which were encompassed by the precincts of the new parish. The first regular minister was the Rev. John Bartow who was sent in 1702 from London by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts. In 1706 Queen Anne of England presented to the congregation a communion service consisting of a chalice and paten, a communion table, a church Bible, a book of homilies, and a pulpit cloth. A royal charter from George III in 1762 incorporated St. Peter's as "the Rector and inhabitants of the Borough Town of Westchester, in Communion of the Church of England, as by law established." This gave the church the authority to conduct its affairs as a corporate and independent body without consulting the authorities and inhabitants of the town. During the American Revolution, the Rev. Samuel Seabury, appointed rector in 1766 and later the first Protestant Episcopal bishop in the United States, aroused, the ire of the local populace by preaching the Tory cause from the pulpit. A new church building, constructed of wood with a cupola containing the original bell, was consecrated in 1795. It was replaced by the present structure, which was completed in 1855 and designed by the noted architect Leopold Eidlitz. Robert Bolton in his History of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the County of Westchester from its Foundation A.D. 1695 to A.D. 1853 (New York, 1855) wrote that "active measures have . . . been taken, for the erection of a parish church, upon or near the old site, towards which pious work fifteen thousand dollars have already been contributed. -- The work is now under contract." He also published a perspective drawing and a floor plan of the church as built. After a fire partially destroyed the building, it was restored by Cyrus L. W. Eidlitz, son of Leopold. The rebuilt structure was consecrated in 1879. The choir room, now the sacristy, was added in 1898, and an extension for offices and a rectory was built beyond the apse in the early 1950's. Leopold Eidlitz (1823-1908) was born in Prague. After studying at the Vienna Polytechnic, he immigrated to New York in 1843, joining the office of Richard Upjohn, the leading exponent of Gothic Revival architecture whose Trinity Church, a designated Mew York City Landmark, was then under construction. Hidlitz soon formed a partnership with Otto Blesch to design St. George's Church, Stuyvesant Square,of 1846-48, also a designated New York City Landmark. This design established Eidlitz's reputation as a church architect and started his career as a practitioner of the Gothic mode. Among his notable churches, in addition to St. Peter's,Westchester, were the Church of the Holy Trinity and Temple Emanu-El in New York (now demolished), the Second Congregational Church, Greenwich, Connecticut, and Christ Church Cathedral, St. Louis. Eidlitz also designed a number of notable commercial and public buildings, none of which have survived with the single exception of bis addition to the old New York County Courthouse. Perhaps his most significant commission was the redesigning and completion of the New York State Capitol in Albany undertaken in partnership with Henry Hobson Richardson and Frederick Law Olmsted during 1875-1885. St. Peter's Church is a strikingly picturesque structure, highly expressive of Leopold Eidlitz's conception of Gothic architecture. With its s
St. Peter's, Westchester
St. Peter's, Westchester
St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Westchester St. Peter's Church, Chapel, and Cemetery form a pleasant and charming enclave in the heart of the old town of Westchester in the Bronx, formerly part of Westchester County. The two strikingly picturesque Gothic style buildings in their quiet graveyard setting dominate the neighborhood and are a tangible reminder of the rural past of this section of the Bronx. The county of Westchester was formed in 1683 and the borough-town of Westchester was named the county seat. St. Peter's Chapel now occupies the site of the old courthouse. In 1788 the state legislature decreed that all counties were to be divided into townships, and the town of Westchester became one of the twenty-one townships of Westchester County. The parish of St. Peter's, one of the oldest in New York City, was organized in 1693 following an act of the Colonial Assembly "for settling a ministry and raising a maintenance for them in the County of Westchester." It was not until 17C0 that the town meeting house, previously used for religious services, was abandoned, and a church was erected. This first edifice, built of wood, was quadrangular in form with a pyramidal roof, in the center of which was a bell turret. The bell, presented to the church by the Morris family, bore the inscription "Lewis Morris, 1677." The church was situated on the town green adjoining the county court house and jail, the same site as that of the present structure. Building expenses were defrayed by a tax levied on all inhabitants of the townships of Westchester, Eastchester, Yonkers, and the manor of Pelham which were encompassed by the precincts of the new parish. The first regular minister was the Rev. John Bartow who was sent in 1702 from London by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts. In 1706 Queen Anne of England presented to the congregation a communion service consisting of a chalice and paten, a communion table, a church Bible, a book of homilies, and a pulpit cloth. A royal charter from George III in 1762 incorporated St. Peter's as "the Rector and inhabitants of the Borough Town of Westchester, in Communion of the Church of England, as by law established." This gave the church the authority to conduct its affairs as a corporate and independent body without consulting the authorities and inhabitants of the town. During the American Revolution, the Rev. Samuel Seabury, appointed rector in 1766 and later the first Protestant Episcopal bishop in the United States, aroused, the ire of the local populace by preaching the Tory cause from the pulpit. A new church building, constructed of wood with a cupola containing the original bell, was consecrated in 1795. It was replaced by the present structure, which was completed in 1855 and designed by the noted architect Leopold Eidlitz. Robert Bolton in his History of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the County of Westchester from its Foundation A.D. 1695 to A.D. 1853 (New York, 1855) wrote that "active measures have . . . been taken, for the erection of a parish church, upon or near the old site, towards which pious work fifteen thousand dollars have already been contributed. -- The work is now under contract." He also published a perspective drawing and a floor plan of the church as built. After a fire partially destroyed the building, it was restored by Cyrus L. W. Eidlitz, son of Leopold. The rebuilt structure was consecrated in 1879. The choir room, now the sacristy, was added in 1898, and an extension for offices and a rectory was built beyond the apse in the early 1950's. Leopold Eidlitz (1823-1908) was born in Prague. After studying at the Vienna Polytechnic, he immigrated to New York in 1843, joining the office of Richard Upjohn, the leading exponent of Gothic Revival architecture whose Trinity Church, a designated Mew York City Landmark, was then under construction. Hidlitz soon formed a partnership with Otto Blesch to design St. George's Church, Stuyvesant Square,of 1846-48, also a designated New York City Landmark. This design established Eidlitz's reputation as a church architect and started his career as a practitioner of the Gothic mode. Among his notable churches, in addition to St. Peter's,Westchester, were the Church of the Holy Trinity and Temple Emanu-El in New York (now demolished), the Second Congregational Church, Greenwich, Connecticut, and Christ Church Cathedral, St. Louis. Eidlitz also designed a number of notable commercial and public buildings, none of which have survived with the single exception of bis addition to the old New York County Courthouse. Perhaps his most significant commission was the redesigning and completion of the New York State Capitol in Albany undertaken in partnership with Henry Hobson Richardson and Frederick Law Olmsted during 1875-1885. St. Peter's Church is a strikingly picturesque structure, highly expressive of Leopold Eidlitz's conception of Gothic architec

lewis wood end table
lewis wood end table
The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine
The real story of the crash began in bizarre feeder markets where the sun doesn't shine and the SEC doesn't dare, or bother, to tread: the bond and real estate derivative markets where geeks invent impenetrable securities to profit from the misery of lower--and middle--class Americans who can't pay their debts. The smart people who understood what was or might be happening were paralyzed by hope and fear; in any case, they weren't talking.

Michael Lewis creates a fresh, character-driven narrative brimming with indignation and dark humor, a fitting sequel to his #1 bestseller Liar's Poker. Out of a handful of unlikely--really unlikely--heroes, Lewis fashions a story as compelling and unusual as any of his earlier bestsellers, proving yet again that he is the finest and funniest chronicler of our time.
The #1 New York Times bestseller: "It is the work of our greatest financial journalist, at the top of his game. And it's essential reading."—Graydon Carter, Vanity Fair

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