Matinee UNC

UNC. Nelson Mandela Auditorium. Global Education Center

 301 Pittsboro St, Chapel Hill, NC  (see the building)

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday. NOVEMBER  9. Matinee. Short Films

UNC- Chapel Hill. Nelson Mandela Auditorium. Global Education Center. Chapel Hill, NC. 4pm

- Gringoton. Greg Berger (Mexico) 2004. 17 minutes

In this brilliant and hilarious parody, filmmaker Greg Berger takes on the theme of Mexican perspectives of the United States, its citizens, and its imperial project by turning them on their ear. During the invasion of Iraq in the spring of 2003, a misplaced gringo in Mexico City helplessly watches the atrocities through the lens of Mexican television news. His despair turns to hope when he observes some of the millions of Mexico City street vendors who fight their own daily “war” for survival on the streets.

Tongue planted firmly in cheek, the film shows how their tenacity inspires him to take to the streets of Mexico’s capital, when, in stark role reversal, he sells chewing gum and washes windows to raise money for a guerrilla army to take out Bush.

 

 

- A History of Committed Cinema. Emilio Rodríguez (Nicaragua) 1983. 15 min.

It is a fast paced documentary which became a primer for the Nicaraguan audience about what they are watching on the screen. A critique of Western (Hollywood) cinema, it outlines the difficult technical, cinematic and political tasks confronting INCINE as it strives to build a native film industry during the first years of the Sandinista Revolution.

 

 

 

- Más Vampiros en la Habana. Juan Padrón (Cuba) 2003. 80 min.

A sequel to the first Vampiros en la Habana (1985) in which the scientist Von Drácula invented the potion Vampisol which allowed vampires’ to live out in the sun. Now Pepe has to face not only the mafia (La Capa Nostra and the European Vampire gang) but the Nazi-vampires which developed a more powerful formula after the original was broadcasted from Radio Vampiro Internacional. A Cold War setting allows the Cuban Vampires to fusion not only Manga and Anime qualities, but also commentaries on the economic and cultural models of the West.