music

Thursday, November 11  | 7 pm.  Alfonso Elder Student Union, NCCU. Durham, NC

Cachila: un hombre, una familia y el legado del Candombe/Cachila: a man, a family and the legacy of Candombe. Sebastián Bednarik. (Uruguay, 2008) 57 min.

Candombe is the most popular manifestation of Afro-Uruguayan music.  Originated in ancient African healing and/or religious ceremonies it is performed to the music of a cuerda de tambores, an ensemble of drums of three different sizes (piano, chico and repique) with a specific set of characters dancing and moving along, and the modern addition of vedettes—scantily dressed, voluptuous dancers, heavily made up and crowned with multicolored feathers.  Waldemar Silva, nicknamed Cachila, is the son of Juan Angel Silva one of the patriarchs of Candombe, and founder of the troupe Morenada.  With his father's permission, Cachila left Morenada and created his own group Cuareim 1080—the street address of the Medio Mundo, a tenement where mostly poor black people lived, and where Morenada was originally conceived.  It is also the place where Cachila was born and lived as a child.  The movie starts with Cachila’s first grandson’s birth at a local hospital, suggesting the continuation of some sort of dynasty.  His children not only play the drums masterfully, but are now integral part of the group that consistently gets the highest marks in the Carnaval yearly competition.  The film clearly shows Cachila’s preoccupation for preserving his cultural roots, and how, through subtle persuasion, he uses his family to accomplish his laudable goals.  This film is a magnificent study of the man and his culture, with proper emphasis on performance and the laborious organization of a very special postmodern spectacle. Spanish with English subtitles.

Introduced by Horacio Xaubet. Associate Professor Modern Foreign Languages, NCCU

 

Saturday, November 13  | 4 pm. Holton Career and Resource Center Auditorium, City of Durham, Durham, NC

Chigualeros. Alex Schlenker. (Ecuador, 2009) 80 min.

This is a documentary about the most famous and important salsa band from Ecuador, the Chigualeros. They have been playing since the 70’s. Through this film you will meet the members of this international orchestra and experience some of their exciting and rough moments, all while enjoying the salsa music produced in the Pacific Coast of Ecuador. Spanish with English subtitles.

 
Arista Son
. Libia Stella Gomez. (Colombia, 2008) 15 min.

Colombian folk music has in the chocoano (Afro-Colombian from the Pacific coast) Aristarco Perea (Arista Son) one of its greatest exponents. As a composer he has more than 340 letters that serve as a faithful testimony of Arista's or other people's experiences, all of them floods of feeling. In Arista Son we hear and see rhythms like Boleros, Merengues Sibaeños, Salsas Son and Merengues Abosaos. Spanish with English subtitles.

 

 
Saturday, November 20  | 4 pm.  Holton Career and Resource Center Auditorium, City of Durham, Durham, NC

Tocar y Luchar/ To Play and To Fight.  Alberto Arvelo. (Venezuela, 2006) 70 min.

Tocar y Luchar presents the captivating story of the Venezuelan Youth Orchestra System - an incredible network of hundreds of orchestras formed within most of Venezuela’s towns and villages. Once a modest program designed to expose rural children to the wonders of music, the system has become one of the most important and beautiful social phenomena in modern history. The documentary portrays the inspirational stories of world class musicians trained by the Venezuelan system, including the Berlin Philharmonic’s youngest player Edicson Ruiz and world renowned conductor Gustavo Dudamel. With interviews with many of the world’s most celebrated musicians including the great tenor Placido Domingo, Claudio Abbado, Sir Simon Rattle, Guiseppe Sinopoli, and Eduardo Mata, the film is an inspirational story of courage, determination, ambition, and love showing us that… only those who dream can achieve the impossible.  Spanish with English subtitles.   

With special presentation of Latin American folk dance and closing reception


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