2009 FILMS

PROGRAM (may suffer changes)

Notes:

* Refers to special UNC-CH/ISA programming, part of the Fall semester 2009 series on “The Cuban Revolution at 50: Art & Cinema.”

- The official opening of the 2009 NC Latin American Film Festival is November 2nd.

- Prior to each screening a short (5 minute) film from the LATINO PORTRAIT PROJECT will be shown.

- Be aware that the 2009 Festival will screen films simultaneously in different venues at certain dates.

 

SUNDAY, November 1. 4 pm. Hanes Art Center 121, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH). Chapel Hill, NC

*Talk: Revolutionary Art or a Revolution in Art? The Legacy of the Cuban

Revolution by David L. Craven, University of New Mexico

Introduced by Emily Kass (Director, Ackland Museum of Art)

Reception to follow.

 

Screening (following the talk): 

UNA FOTO RECORRE AL MUNDO, Pedro Chaskel - ICAIC (Cuba, 1981). 13 min.

On how a single shot taken by Cuban photographer Alberto Korda of Che Guevara’s face during a memorial event became such an icon. The short documentary tells that it became an icon because the world needed a figure of hope...  

 

This is the first of a series of talks and screenings organized by the UNC-CH Institute for the Study of the Americas in conjunction with the exhibit “Almost Now:  Cuban Art, Cinema, and Politics” at the Ackland Art Museum.  The exhibit runs August 26 – December 6, 2009. 

See more info: http://www.ackland.org/art/exhibitions/2009/almost_now/

 

 

Official Opening, 2009 NC Latin American Film Festival

MONDAY, November 2. 7 pm. Campus Cinema. Witherspoon Student Center. North Carolina State University (NCSU). Raleigh, NC

WHICH WAY HOME. Rebecca Cammisa (USA-Mexico, 2009). 90 min.

Each year, thousands of Latin American migrants travel hundreds of miles to the US, with many making their way on the tops of freight trains. Roughly 5% of those traveling alone are children. As the US continues to debate immigration reform, the documentary Which Way Home looks at the issue through the eyes of children who face the harrowing journey through Mexico with enormous courage and resourcefulness. Putting a human face on the immigration issue, director Rebecca Cammisa (director of the CINEMAX documentary Sister Helen) reveals some of the reasons kids resort to drastic and dangerous measures, among them: bringing an end to long-term separation from their parents; escaping life on the streets; lack of jobs or educational opportunities at home; and hopes of a better life north of the border.

An official selection at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival and the 2009 Los Angeles Film Festival.

Spanish and English with subtitles

 

Movie homepage with trailer:  http://www.hbo.com/docs/docuseries/whichwayhome/


TUESDAY, November 3. 7pm. ERC Auditorium (main campus). Durham Tech Community College.  Durham, NC

THE OTHER SIDE OF IMMIGRATION, Roy Germano (Mexico-USA) 57 min.

Why do so many Mexicans come to the US illegally? What happens to the families and communities they leave behind? Director Roy Germano seeks answers to these and other questions in The Other Side of Immigration, a documentary based on his interviews with over 700 households in rural Mexican towns where 20-50% of the population has left to work in the US. Through an approach that is both subtle and thought-provoking, The Other Side of Immigration challenges audiences to imagine more creative and effective solutions to America’s illegal immigration problem.

Spanish and English with subtitles

 

Round table on Immigration

Movie homepage with trailer: www.theothersideofimmigration.com/HOME.html


THURSDAY, November 5. 7 pm. Jarrell Lecture Hall (in Jackson Library). University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNC-G). Greensboro, NC

SUITE HABANA, Fernando Pérez (Cuba, 2003). 84 min.

This documentary was filmed with fictional cinema techniques depicting a day in the life of 13 real people, from a 10-year-old child with Down syndrome to a 79-year-old lady who sells peanuts in the street. The film has no dialogue, using sound and image to evoke emotional effect. Several stories are juxtaposed to convey the plot points, an unusual approach in Cuban cinema, where spoken words are often used extensively.

After the film's premiere in Cuba, national critics ranked it as one of the best Cuban films in decades. The film gathered several awards at international film festivals. Variety called it, "A lyrical, meticulously-crafted and unexpectedly melancholy homage to the battered but resilient inhabitants of a battered but resilient city."

Spanish with English subtitles

 

SATURDAY, November 7. 7 pm. Campus Cinema. Witherspoon Student Center. NCSU. Raleigh, NC

CHE, El Argentino (CHE, Part 1), Steven Soderbergh. (Spain-France-USA, 2008) 134 min.

Che, parts 1 & 2, are shot in a cinéma vérité style, but each has different approaches to linear narrative (since they are historical reconstructions), camerawork, and the visual look; this duality is intended to be reflective of the 2 military campaigns' Che Guevara participated and their divergent outcomes.

Che, The Argentine begins as Che and a band of Cuban exiles (led by Fidel Castro) reach the Cuban shore from Mexico in 1956. Within 2 years, they mobilized popular support and an army and toppled the U.S.-friendly regime of dictator Fulgencio Batista.

English and Spanish with subtitles

 

Introduced by Jordi Mari. Dept. of Foreign Language and Literature, NCSU

 

SUNDAY, November 8. Talk at 6 pm. Film at 7 pm. Nelson Mandela Auditorium – FedEx Global Education Center, UNC-CH. Chapel Hill, NC

*Talk: Democracy and Society: Perspectives in Cuban Hip Hop by David

Garcia, UNC-CH, Music department.  

 

* Screening: LA FABRI-K (THE CUBAN HIP HOP FACTORY). Lisandro Pérez-Rey (Cuba, 2004). 62min.

When 2 popular Cuban rap groups, Obsesión and Doble-Filo, join forces to create a new musical revolution in Cuba, they never expect to be thrust into an intense journey into the heart of hip-hop. This documentary follows the artists, known collectively as "La Fabri_k" (The Factory), from their humble homes in Havana through their eye-opening concert tour of the US. They encounter legendary hip-hop personalities and plenty of drama along the way to their groundbreaking performance at the famous Apollo Theater in Harlem. Will they be lured by the glitter of consumerism or will their mission lead to revival of musical consciousness?

Commissioned by the Miami Light Project.

Spanish and English (with English and Spanish subtitles).

 

Introduced by John Chasteen, Dept. of History, UNC-CH.

Reception to follow.

 

MONDAY, November 9. 7 pm. Griffith Film Theater.  Bryan Center. Duke University. Durham, NC

CHEVOLUTION. Luis López & Trisha Ziff (Germany – Cuba, 2008). 90 min.

In 1960, Cuban photographer Alberto Korda captured a photo of Ernesto "Che" Guevara during a mass funeral for the victims of an explosion in Havana harbor - a watershed moment in the emerging new Cuba. The photograph was only published once in the first year after it was taken. In fact, for the subsequent 7 years, it existed as a simple cropped print, pinned on Korda's studio wall, seen only by those who visited his studio.  But history conspired to enable this dynamic portrait to explode on the world scene in 1968 throughout Europe and Latin America, when it became the symbol of protest and dissent. Almost 50 years later, the image remains one of the most dominant icons of the 20th century. In the last decade, with the establishment of the internet, the image has once again traveled the globe in many forms. From protest to commerce, it is constantly transformed and reinvented.  Worn by millions, in various incarnations throughout the globe, the image resonates beyond the memory of the man and has come to signify a more general notion of rebellion for those who think outside the mainstream. From radical chic to radical politics, Korda's Che image is saint, guerrilla and fashion statement.  It is considered to be the most reproduced image in the history of photography.  Why and how did this photograph become so important?

Chevolution is a film about a photograph. It explores how the Che image traveled from Korda's studio in Havana to the streets of Europe and beyond. We investigate how this portrait with its enigmatic gaze became a symbol for countless visions for change.  Today many people learn about Che Guevara from first seeing the image on a t-shirt - the iconic image preceding the man and his vision.

Spanish and English (with English and Spanish subtitles).

 

Presented by Tom Whiteside, film historian, audio visual technician at Duke

Q & A following the screening.

 

TUESDAY, November 10. 7 pm. Educational Resource Center (ERC) Auditorium (main campus). Durham Technical Community College. Durham, NC

BEYOND DENUNCIATION: ARTENEMO AND DOCUMENTARY THRESHOLDS FROM CENTRAL AMERICA. Curated by Jorge Albán (Costa Rican curator and new media artist).  
The short films in this series explore collaborative film production from an open source platform in Central America. The audiovisual strategies rest on performative, reflexive, and participative documentary, these productions shatter not only the fourth wall, but our preconceptions of what a documentary is supposed to be and do.

-PLATILLOS TRADICIONALES BORUCUAS: TESORO VIVO DE LA CULTURA / Borucuan Dishes: cultural treasure (Leyla Garro, Borucuan Community. 2008). 4min. For years costarican researcher Leyla Garro has gathered food recipes and life stories from the Boruca people, and indigenous tribe living in the southeast region of Costa Rica. Over 140 different dishes have been identified and the list is still growing.

- MUSICA Y POESIS EN LA LEON XIII / Music and Poetry in Leon XIII (Natalia Esquivel, Artenemo, 2009). 4min.  Costarican musician and teacher Natalia Esquivel has been teaching choral singing and producing cultural meetings with guests artists for young people in Leon XIII, a feared poor neighborhood north of San Jose, capital of Costa Rica, Central America.

- CANTORAS COMPOSITORAS DE GUANACUASTE / Women Singers and Composers from Guanacuaste (Karol Cabalceta, Artenemo. 2009). 5min. Costarican musician and researcher Karol Cabalceta noticed she often was the only woman singing at peñas or typical celebrations of the nortwest region of Costa Rica called Guanacaste. So she set out looking for women singer-composers. Eight of them are portrayed in this documentary, entirely produced in Puppy Linux using nothing but free and open source software.

- ANGIE CONTRA EL MUNDO / Angie against the World (Ana Luisa Sánchez, Panamá. 2005). Interactive video. A girl runs across Panama City while escaping from a force that wants to get her, dominate her, abused her. She is Panama, what way to go?

 

- KUNFU (Hugo Ochoa, Honduras. 2006) 6min. A video essay on homeless people, performance and political subjectivity. 

 

-AYER SE FUE /Yesterday He Left (Victor Rodriguez, El Salvador. 2006). 6min. A remix of images and sounds of street children in San Salvador.

 

-  PROHIBIDO BAILAR SUIN / Not Swing Dancing Allowed (Gabriela Hernández, Costa Rica, 2003). 35min. This documentary provides one of the most clear and vivid expressions of Costa Rican urban popular culture: the “creole swing” or cumbia. It is made from the perspective of a group of dancers -- a businessman, a dance teacher, a taxi driver, a disc jockey, a dentist/musician, a wage laborer and a young transvestite who all have in common their passion for the swing and meet each other frequently in a dance hall, Karymar, reknowned as “The Cradle of Swing.” 

Spanish with English subtitles

Introduction and presentation by Jorge Albán and filmmaker Gabriela Hernández.

Q & A following the screening.

 

WEDNESDAY, November 11. Talk at 6 pm. Film at 7 pm. Nelson Mandela Auditorium – FedEx Global Education Center, UNC-CH. Chapel Hill, NC

*Talk: Between the Industry and Independence in Cuba: Street Filmmakers
Document an Island in Transition
, Anne Marie Stock. William & Mary College.

*Screenings:

EL PROPIETARIO, Ernesto Piña Rodríguez y Wilbert Noguel (Cuba, 2008). 7 min. Animation.  The constant struggle between rich and poor, assassins and innocent victims, owners and clients.

ODA A LA PINA, Laimir Fano (Cuba, 2008). 11min.

This musical parody, an homage to the poem that forged Cuban cultural identity, centers on a cabaret dancer who suddenly loses her rhythm.

EXISTEN, Esteban Insausti (Cuba, 2005). 25min.

From the perspective of a madman, the Cuban reality offers an interesting point of view.

Having all been released in the last 5 years, together these 3 films provide a window into some of the work currently being produced by Cuban filmmakers.

Spanish with English Subtitles

Q&A following the lecture. 


See book: On Location in Cuba: Street Filmmaking During Times of Transition.

Anne Marie Stock. UNC-CH Press, 2009.

“Street Filmmakers are industrious, ingenious, and innovative. Juan Carlos Cremata Malberti, Esteban Insausti, Pavel Giroud, Léster Hamlet, Arturo Infante, Luis Leonel León, Humberto Padrón, Ian Padrón, Gustavo Pérez, and Waldo Ramírez are among the Street Filmmakers who have helped change the course of Cuba’s revolutionary cinema. And their efforts are already influencing up-and-coming audiovisual artists like Carlos Barba, Susana Barriga, Alejandro Brugués, Karel Ducases Manzano, Sandra Gómez Jiménez, Inti Herrera, Ernesto Piña Rodríguez, Jeffrey Puente García, Alejandro Ramírez, Alina Rodríguez Abreu, Asori ( Amado Soto Ricardo), Hilda Elena Vega, Daniel Vera, Aram Vidal, and dozens of others [...]”

 

 

THURSDAY, November 12. 7 pm. Michaux School of Education Auditorium. North Carolina Central University (NCCU).  Durham, NC

OPEN CUBAN CINEMA / SHORT FILMS

RAZA, Eric Corvalán Pellé (Cuba, 2008). 35 min.

An exploration about what Cubans think and what they believe about race relations in contemporary times. It is also a portrait of how they behave in everyday life.

INTERMEZZO, Eduardo del Llano (Cuba, 2007). 9 min.

In a men’s bathroom a discussion takes place. One member of a committee votes against a proposal, suddenly he becomes the hero of the democratic process. Also he finds himself in an awkward position with respect to the reality he lives in…

BRAINSTORM, Eduardo del Llano (Cuba, 2008). 13 min.

On the role of journalism in contemporary Cuba; a practice that supposedly has to be combative, investigative, neutral…. Nonetheless, it becomes a space for celebration and spectacle. What, then, is the real role of journalism?

Spanish with English subtitles

 

Thanks to Chiapas Media Project

 

THURSDAY, November 12. 7 pm.  Jarrell Lecture Hall (in Jackson Library). UNC-G. Greensboro, NC

CHEVOLUTION. Luis López & Trisha Ziff (Germany – Cuba, 2008). 90 min.

In 1960, Cuban photographer Alberto Korda captured a photo of Ernesto "Che" Guevara during a mass funeral for the victims of an explosion in Havana harbor - a watershed moment in the emerging new Cuba. The photograph was only published once in the first year after it was taken. In fact, for the subsequent 7 years, it existed as a simple cropped print, pinned on Korda's studio wall, seen only by those who visited his studio.  But history conspired to enable this dynamic portrait to explode on the world scene in 1968 throughout Europe and Latin America, when it became the symbolof protest and dissent. Almost 50 years later, the image remains one of the most dominant icons of the twentieth century. In the last decade, with the establishment of the internet, the image has once again traveled the globe in many forms. From protest to commerce, it is constantly transformed and reinvented.  Worn by millions, in various incarnations throughout the globe, the image resonates beyond the memory of the man and has come to signify a more general notion of rebellion for those who think outside the mainstream. From radical chic to radical politics, Korda's Che image is saint, guerrilla and fashion statement.  It is considered to be the most reproduced image in the history of photography.  Why and how did this photograph become so important?

Chevolution is a film about a photograph. It explores how the Che image traveled from Korda's studio in Havana to the streets of Europe and beyond. We investigate how this portrait with its enigmatic gaze became a symbol for countless visions for change.  Today many people learn about Che Guevara from first seeing the image on a t-shirt - the iconic image preceding the man and his vision.

Spanish and English (English and Spanish subtitles)

Q&A to follow the screening.

 

FRIDAY, November 13. 7 pm. Frank Family Science Center. Guilford College. Greensboro, NC

EL AURA, Fabián Bielinski (Argentina, 2006) 134 min.

Espinoza is a shy taxidermist who secretly dreams of executing the perfect robbery. On his first ever hunting trip, in the calm of the Patagonian forest, his dreams become reality with one squeeze of the trigger. Espinoza accidentally kills a man who turns out to be a real criminal and inherits his scheme: the heist of an armored van carrying casino profits. Caught up in a world of complex new rules and frightening violence, Espinoza's lack of experience puts him in real danger. And he has another, more dangerous liability: he is an epileptic. Before each seizure he is visited by the ''aura'': a paradoxical moment of confusion and enlightenment where the past and future seem to blend.

Spanish with English Subtitles

 

Introduced by Kathryn Bowers, Dept. of Spanish Language, Guilford College

Musical Presentation by Lorena Guillen & Alejandro Rutty, Tango.

 

FRIDAY, November 13. 6 pm. Holton Career & Resource Center. City of Durham. Durham, NC

Community Connects Series 

THE ACCORDION KINGS: THE STORY OF COLOMBIAN VALLENATO MUSIC, Alan Tomlinson (US-Colombia, 2008). 60 min.

Every ten years the “king of kings” is crowned at the annual Festival Vallenato in Valledupar (a city on the Caribbean coast of Colombia). This documentary film is about that rhythm that has become the label for many of the successful contemporary pop-musicians in Colombia (Shakira, Carlos Vives, Cabas, among others). It is called vallenato (from el Valle de Upar), the soulful music of Colombia's Caribbean coast.

The film tells the story of the traditional beat at the heart of Latin America’s richest music, featuring an exclusive interview with pop star Carlos Vives and behind-the-scenes footage of the legendary Vallenato Festival. In Colombia’s northern Magdalena Valley, "valley music" is the rage and the accordion is king. Now, valley music's rural sentiment, straightforward message, and danceable rhythms have invaded the city, and pop megastars such as Carlos Vives have taken its sounds to millions of fans around the world. Even mega pop stars Shakira and Gloria Estefan have fused this rhythm into their songs. Música vallenata was born in the region where Gabriel García Márquez drew his inspiration. It’s a place where small children learn to play the accordion at their father’s knee while hundreds of professional practitioners, sometimes several generations of accordeoneros in the same family, perform dazzling feats of musical prowess at social events and duel for bragging rights at annual festivals.

Produced by the Smithsonian Network in 2008

Spanish and English with subtitles

 

Presented by Monica Lee Bellais, Smithsonian Network (to confirm)

Q & A to follow.

 

&

 

SOY ANDINA, Mitchell Teplitsky (Peru-USA, 2009). 70 min.

The dazzling story of two women raised in different worlds — an immigrant folk dancer from the Andes, and a modern dancer from Queens, NY — who return to Peru to reconnect with roots and an astonishing world of traditional dance and celebration.

After 15 years in New York, Nelida Silva returns to her birthplace in the Andes to fulfill a lifelong dream and host the fiesta patronal — an 8-day celebration of dance, music, and rituals from Incan times. But Neli's changed, and so has the village. What's it like to go back to the Andes when you've become a New Yorker?

Meanwhile: Cynthia Paniagua, a dancer raised in Queens by a Peruvian mom, embarks on her own Peruvian journey after meeting Neli — determined to "quench a burning desire to know the real Peru, to unearth the mystery of the dances." Does she find what she's looking for? Well, you'll have to see the movie! Soy Andina is an exuberant cross-cultural road trip, bursting with traditional music and dance rarely seen outside the country. But the core story is intimate and universal: a yearning for roots and connection in turbulent times.

English and Spanish with subtitles

 

SATURDAY, November 14. 7pm.  Richard White Auditorium. Duke University. Durham, NC

Latino Portrait Project presents: Works of Andrés Tapia-Urzua, 1993-2009

SPANGLISH (15 min. Color, Stereo, 1993).

Spanglish signifies a concept of America requiring a new and closer continental identity in the light of cultural and artistic continental unity, a bridge across our divided cultures. The film comes directly from the soul of one of the Spanglish zone’s inhabitants in an effort to represent its poetic essence.

UP (20 min. Color, Stereo, 1996).

This video is an attempt to reconnect the director’s own dislocated sense of history through his bicultural understanding of America. In Up he is building a narrative that represents the hybrid character of his subjectivity.

LOVERDOSIS (15 min. Color. Stereo, 2000).

As an encroaching techno-scientific world stretches the schism between body and mind, this artist’s gutsy vision attempts to pull them back together, again.

IRON JOE (2 min. Color, Stereo, 2000).

Using an arrangement of matrimonial mannequins, a neon sign depicting a man ironing plus raw voice overs, Iron Joe is created as a little soap-opera drama about domestic violence and love.

MATADERO KARMA (Slaughter House Karma) (45 min. Color, Stereo, 1999).

Two realities, Chile and the US (a slaughter house and a bathtub) are constantly interrupted by signs from beyond. A comment on meat processing, subconscious randomness, and alien encounters….

English and Spanish with subtitles

 

Introduced by Andrés Tapia-Urzua (see bio ATZ)

Q & A to follow

 


&

 

Trailer: ROBERTO’S DREAM. Rodrigo Dorfman (Durham, 2010)

Introduced by the film maker

 

 

 

SUNDAY, November 15. Talk at 6 pm. Film at 7 pm. Nelson Mandela Auditorium – FedEx Global Education Center, UNC-CH. Chapel Hill, NC

*Talk: The Films of Sara Gómez by Todd Ramón Ochoa. UNC-CH Dept. of Religious Studies

* Film:  DE CIERTA MANERA (One Way or Another), Sara Gómez (Cuba, 1974/1977). 74min.

A fascinating cinematic mix of documentary and fiction, De Cierta Manera looks at the marginal neighborhoods of Havana shortly after the triumph of the 1959 Revolution, examining how the transformations engendered by the revolution manifested themselves in these areas.  As the film reveals, Gómez was a revolutionary filmmaker with intersecting concerns: the Afro-Cuban community and the value of its cultural traditions, women's issues, the treatment of marginalized sectors of society, and the role of family within the context of the revolution and workers' rights. For its time, the film was extremely radical both in form and content. Hence, Sara Gómez remains one of the most significant filmmakers from Latin America.

Spanish with English subtitles

MONDAY, November 16. 7pm. Griffith Film Theater. Bryan Center. Duke University. Durham, NC

SLEEP DEALER. Alex Rivera (Mexico-USA, 2008). 90 min.

Sleep Dealer is a science fiction set in a world, not too unlike our own, in which a global, high speed network ties distant people and places together. The story takes place among 3 characters who inhabit very different spaces in this world: a migrant, a soldier, and a writer.  Memo Cruz is a young peasant farmer in southern Mexico (he wants to leave his town and make a better life in the North); Rudy Gaeta is a soldier fighting in this future war (against terrorism, in Rudy's first assignment he attacks Memo's home in Mexico); Luz is a writer, she connects her body to the net, speaks and puts the recorded memories up for sale on the net – a blog, straight from the brain (she narrates the story of Memo).

In Tijuana, Memo finds work in a futuristic factory – he earns dollars by connecting his body to the net, and controlling a worker drone in America. At home in San Diego, Rudy the soldier spends his free time plugging in and watching recordings of other people's memories.  He finds Luz's story, buys it, and for the first time, through Luz's recorded memories, he sees Memo's face - the face of his victim.  Through Luz's stories, effectively through her eyes and ears, Rudy gets to know Memo. And as Luz and Memo fall in love, Rudy realizes what he's done. 

Sleep Dealer won the Alfred P. Sloan Prize in the 2008 Sundance Film Festival. Geoffrey Gilmore, the festival director, describes the movie as "a combination of The Matrix, Blade Runner and The Border." A Latino Sci-Fi classic (already).

English and Spanish with subtitles

 

Introduced by Director Alex Rivera

Q & A to follow.

 

Movie homepage with trailer:  http://sleepdealer.com/

 

TUESDAY, November 17. 7 pm. Michaux School of Education Auditorium. NCCU. Durham, NC

TUMACO PACIFICO. Samuel Córdoba (Colombia, 2008). 90 min.

This remarkable film portrays daily life in an underdeveloped and overpopulated city that has been struck by a tsunami of violence. Tumaco is a city inhabited mainly by Afro-Colombians, where thousands live in houses standing on stilts over the ocean, with no proper water or sanitation systems. It is a symbol of marginality. However, Tumaco natives Junior, Carmen Julia, Doña Eduarda, and Don Carlos share their life stories and their most profound reflections, revealing their struggles to survive in an endangered environment.  Absurd and beautiful at same time, the city grows over an ocean full of trash…and dreams.

Award winner, 26th Latin American Film Festival Bordeaux, France (public award) & First Award best feature length documentary film 2009 FESALP Film Festival, La Plata. Argentina

Spanish with English subtitles

 

Introduced by Director Samuel Córdoba.

Q & A following the screening.

 

Movie homepage with trailer:  http://tumacopacifico.com

 

 

WEDNESDAY, November 18. 7pm. The Carolina Theatre. Durham, NC

SLEEP DEALER. Alex Rivera (Mexico-USA, 2008). 90 min.

Sleep Dealer is a science fiction set in a world, not too unlike our own, in which a global, high speed network ties distant people and places together. The story takes place among 3 characters who inhabit very different spaces in this world: a migrant, a soldier, and a writer.  Memo Cruz is a young peasant farmer in southern Mexico (he wants to leave his town and make a better life in the North); Rudy Gaeta is a soldier fighting in this future war (against terrorism, in Rudy's first assignment he attacks Memo's home in Mexico); Luz is a writer, she connects her body to the net, speaks and puts the recorded memories up for sale on the net – a blog, straight from the brain (she narrates the story of Memo).

In Tijuana, Memo finds work in a futuristic factory – he earns dollars by connecting his body to the net, and controlling a worker drone in America. At home in San Diego, Rudy the soldier spends his free time plugging in and watching recordings of other people's memories.  He finds Luz's story, buys it, and for the first time, through Luz's recorded memories, he sees Memo's face - the face of his victim.  Through Luz's stories, effectively through her eyes and ears, Rudy gets to know Memo. And as Luz and Memo fall in love, Rudy realizes what he's done. 

Sleep Dealer won the Alfred P. Sloan Prize in the 2008 Sundance Film Festival. Geoffrey Gilmore, the festival director, describes the movie as "a combination of The Matrix, Blade Runner and The Border". A Latino Sci-Fi classic (already).

English and Spanish with subtitles

 

The Carolina Theatre of Durham: www.carolinatheatre.org.

 

THURSDAY, November 19. 7 pm. Campus Cinema. Witherspoon Student Center. North NCSU. Raleigh, NC

CHE, GUERRILLA (CHE, Part 2), Steven Soderbergh. (USA, 2008) 135 min.

In 1965, Ernesto 'Che' Guevara resigns from his Cuban government posts to secretly make his latest attempt to spread the revolution in Bolivia. Che arrives in La Paz, Bolivia late in 1966, and a year later he and several Cuban volunteers have raised a small guerrilla army to take on the militarist Bolivian movement. However, Che must face grim realities about his few troops and supplies, his failing health, and a local population who largely does not share his idealistic aspirations. As the US-supported Bolivian army prepares to defeat him, Che and his beleaguered forces struggle against increasingly hopeless odds.

English and Spanish with subtitles

 

Introduced by: Penny Simpson, NCSU.

 

THURSDAY, November 19. 7 pm. Holton Career & Resource Center. City of Durham. Durham, NC

Community Connects Series

IKO - THE KING OF KASEKO Vincent Soekra (Suriname, 2008). 90 min.

The music documentary IKO – the King of Kaseko explores the life of Lieve Hugo (Dutch for “Dear Hugo”), the most prominent popular musician of Suriname from the late 1950s to the mid 1970s who had a strong influence on the development of this typical Surinamese music. The film succeeds in putting Kaseko music, a Caribbean fusion between calypso and son, on the map. It also features a 2008 Kaseko Crossover concert performed in the Amsterdam Concerthall which consisted of interpretations by today’s Dutch and Surinamese pop icons of re-arranged Kaseko songs originally performed by Lieve Hugo. Thanks to his great influence on the development of Kaseko, the uncrowned king is the quintessential example of this typical Surinamese music.

 

Introduced by Director Vincent Soekra

Q&A to follow

Music presentation by Freek Hunsel (Surinamese percussionist)

 

THURSDAY, November 19. 7 pm. Jarrell Lecture Hall (in Jackson Library). UNC-G. Greensboro, NC

TUMACO PACIFICO. Samuel Córdoba (Colombia, 2008). 90 min.

This remarkable film portrays daily life in an underdeveloped and overpopulated city that has been struck by a tsunami of violence. Tumaco is a city inhabited mainly by Afro-Colombians, where thousands live in houses standing on stilts over the ocean, with no proper water or sanitation systems. It is a symbol of marginality. However, Tumaco natives Junior, Carmen Julia, Doña Eduarda, and Don Carlos share their life stories and their most profound reflections, revealing their struggles to survive in an endangered environment.  Absurd and beautiful at same time, the city grows over an ocean full of trash…and dreams.

Award winner, 26th Latin American Film Festival Bordeaux, France (public award)

Spanish with English subtitles

 

Presented by Jeanine Costa. UNC-G Dept. of Romance Languages

Introduced by Director Samuel Cordoba

Q & A to follow

 

FRIDAY, November 20. 5-7 pm. Richard White Auditorium. Duke University. Durham, NC.

The Latino Portrait Project presents:

UN HOGAR LEJANO / A DISTANT HOME (2009 SAF Folklife Documentary Project)

Each spring and summer, fields across the US South bloom with abundance and fill with laborers to tend them.  What do these workers think about as they hurry along the furrows and under the blazing sun, or when they rest after the long workday? Most farm workers leave families and community behind to come and work in these distant fields; these people and places must often occupy their thoughts as the season wears on. If they are to be far from home for so much of the year, what do migrant workers think about their homes? How do they make a home here in the South, how does it compare to their distant home?  This past summer, SAF Interns and farmworkers collaborated to document personal stories and the meaning of home for those workers, both here in the South and in their community of origin.

Spanish and English with subtitles

 

Featuring:

Manos Sin Identidad, by Laura Valencia. Student at Wooster College in Ohio.

Harvesting Dreams, by Adriana Sanchez. Student at California State University - Fresno (recipient, First Annual Petrow-Freeman Documentary Award)

Un Hogar Lejano, by April Leanne Simon (SAF Intern) and Derek Anderson. Photographer and Documentarian

 

FRIDAY, November 20. 7pm. Frank Family Science Center. Guilford College. Greensboro, NC

SLEEP DEALER. Alex Rivera (Mexico-USA, 2008). 90min.

Sleep Dealer is a science fiction set in a world, not too unlike our own, in which a global, high speed network ties distant people and places together. The story takes place among 3 characters who inhabit very different spaces in this world: a migrant, a soldier, and a writer.  Memo Cruz is a young peasant farmer in southern Mexico (he wants to leave his town and make a better life in the North); Rudy Gaeta is a soldier fighting in this future war (against terrorism, in Rudy's first assignment he attacks Memo's home in Mexico); Luz is a writer, she connects her body to the net, speaks and puts the recorded memories up for sale on the net – a blog, straight from the brain (she narrates the story of Memo).

In Tijuana, Memo finds work in a futuristic factory – he earns dollars by connecting his body to the net, and controlling a worker drone in America. At home in San Diego, Rudy the soldier spends his free time plugging in and watching recordings of other people's memories.  He finds Luz's story, buys it, and for the first time, through Luz's recorded memories, he sees Memo's face - the face of his victim.  Through Luz's stories, effectively through her eyes and ears, Rudy gets to know Memo. And as Luz and Memo fall in love, Rudy realizes what he's done.  Sleep Dealer won the Alfred P. Sloan Prize in the 2008 Sundance Film Festival. Geoffrey Gilmore, the festival director, describes the movie as "a combination of The Matrix, Blade Runner and The Border". A Latino Sci-Fi classic (already).

English and Spanish with subtitles

 


SUNDAY, November 22. Talk at 6 pm. Film 7 pm. Nelson Mandela Auditorium – Fedex Global Education Center, UNC-CH. Chapel Hill, NC

*Talk: Legacy of a Champion: Kid Chocolate and Sport as Nationalist Expression in Cuba by Enver Casimir, UNC-CH, History

KID CHOCOLATE, Gerardo Chijona (Cuba, 1987) 30 min.

In this documentary, Cuba’s first boxing world champion recounts some of his exploits in the rings of New York City and reflects on his experience as a sporting celebrity during the late 1920s and early 1930s.

Spanish with English subtitles

Q&A to follow