Educational Leadership in the Digital Age

(Adapted by Julie Elkan from content by Lynn Hilt)




Let's examine the role of the administrator in the shift to a digital learning environment. Surprisingly, being a tech savvy leader is really no longer enough......


Digital Age School Leaders:

1) Work with stakeholders to craft and bring to life an actionable vision for student success. 
2) Serve as the school's lead learner.
3) Connect to learn. Through the formation of personal learning networks and use of social media tools, a school leader can build relationships, form partnerships, share ideas, ask questions, find support, and be inspired by dedicated educators and experts from around the world!

4) Curate: As the school or district's instructional leader, you no doubt are swimming in a sea of resources. Print resources, free ASCD books in the mail, and websites galore. It is your responsibility to help your teachers stay current and find and share relevant instructional resources. You become a "curator" - one who creates spaces for learning.
5) Communicate: One of the most essential elements of the daily work of administrators and school leaders! We have a lot of information to share, endless conversations to facilitate, and voices to acknowledge and listen to.


Traditionally, many administrative communication efforts have been one-way: bulletins, paper newsletters, memos in mailboxes. PowerPoint presentations during faculty meetings and in-services, following an agenda created on Word the day before and distributed at the start of the meeting.
And emails. So many emails.
How can we ignite communication efforts to be more streamlined? More effective? More energizing? To encourage two-way, open communication among stakeholders? (Lynn Hilt)




Effective digital age administrators are connected role models who:

1. Develop a Vision for Technology: Visionary Leadership

4.  Act as Curators
As the school or district's instructional leader, you no doubt are swimming in a sea of resources. Print resources, free ASCD books in the mail, and websites galore. It is your responsibility to help your teachers stay current and find and share relevant instructional resources. You become a "curator" - one who creates spaces for learning. (Lyn Hilt)
5. Communicate, inviting comments and feedback

littlebirdtales.com cover image
Click the image to view one principal's personal journey
towards 
a developing a vision for leadership in the digital age.

The International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) is an organization that supports students, teachers, administrators, and coaches in the quest to advance the effective use of technology in education:

ISTE's NETS for Administrators (NETS•A) are the standards for evaluating the skills and knowledge school administrators and leaders need to support digital age learning, implement technology, and transform the education landscape.

Transforming schools into digital age places of learning requires leadership from people who can accept new challenges and embrace new opportunities. Now more than ever, the success of technology integration depends on leaders who can implement systemic reform in our schools.

The standards address these five domains: 

  1. Visionary Leadership
  2. Digital Age Learning Culture
  3. Excellence in Professional Practice
  4. Systemic Improvement
  5. Digital Citizenship

Reflection: Which area(s) of the standards are your strengths, and which area(s) would you like to further develop to support your work as administrator?

Julie Elkan:elkanj@gmail.com
Twitter: @elkanj