AVERAGE BIKE RIDING SPEED - AVERAGE BIKE

Average Bike Riding Speed - Bike Gear Clock - Women's Street Bike Gear.

Average Bike Riding Speed


average bike riding speed
    bike riding
  • Cycling, also called bicycling or biking, is the use of bicycles for transport, recreation, or for sport. Persons engaged in cycling are cyclists. or bicyclists.
    average
  • Achieve or amount to as an average rate or amount over a period of time
  • a statistic describing the location of a distribution; "it set the norm for American homes"
  • Calculate or estimate the average of (figures or measurements)
  • approximating the statistical norm or average or expected value; "the average income in New England is below that of the nation"; "of average height for his age"; "the mean annual rainfall"
  • Result in an even distribution; even out
  • amount to or come to an average, without loss or gain; "The number of hours I work per work averages out to 40"
    speed
  • Move quickly
  • distance travelled per unit time
  • Move or work more quickly
  • rush: move fast; "He rushed down the hall to receive his guests"; "The cars raced down the street"
  • (of a motorist) Travel at a speed that is greater than the legal limit
  • accelerate: move faster; "The car accelerated"
average bike riding speed - Garmin Edge
Garmin Edge 705 GPS-Enabled Cycling Computer (Includes Heart Rate Monitor)
Garmin Edge 705 GPS-Enabled Cycling Computer (Includes Heart Rate Monitor)
Trainer. Navigator. Edge 705 pushes you to do your best, then shows you the way back. This GPS-enabled cycle computer knows no limits. Edge 705 comes with a microSD card slot for adding map detail and storing workouts, courses and saved rides. Also included is a wireless heart rate monitor to measure your heart rate and track your heart rate zone, operating with Garmin's innovative ANT + Sport wireless technology. Edge 705 automatically measures your speed, distance, time, calories burned, altitude, climb and descent, and records this data for your review. Connected to your computer via USB, you can then download your workout data, analyze it and store it. You can even share it wirelessly with other Edge 705 buddies without being near the computer. When it comes to the curve of workout technology, Garmin takes you to the Edge.

Garmin has really upped the ante on the entire cycling computer category with it's new gps-enabled navigator/computer, the 705. This is a true navigational aid with full-color maps and turn-by-turn directions in addition to advanced route-planning and saving capabilities. On top of that, the 705 adds heart rate and cadence monitors, a barometric altimeter, and wireless capability that lets you share routes and workout data with other riders instantly. Sleek and waterproof, with a 2.2-inch color screen that lets you customize what data you see and how you see it, these two devices help make the most of every ride.

The 705 comes in three different models. The basic model comes with a heart-rate monitor. You can also get models that add a speed/cadence sensor, and a supplemental map. The Edge 305 Screen (actual size)
Edge 305 Screen Shot


The larger color screen (actual size) on the Edge 705 shows you your surroundings more clearly and supports real turn-by-turn navigation.
Edge 705 screen shot
The Power Of Location-Based Data
Anyone who has used Garmin's original Edge 205 or 305 already understands the power that attaching location data to traditional measurements like distance, speed, time, calories burned, and heart rate can provide. Knowing exactly where you worked hardest, rode fastest (or most slowly) lets you tailor your workouts to improve to improve your riding skills for specific distances, conditions, and types of terrain. It gives a complete picture of how you interact with every portion of your ride.

Altitude is recorded using a barometric altimeter for the Edge 705. This accurate altitude data makes it much easier for cyclists to match their altitude profile with their speed, cadence, and heart rate during post-ride analysis.

A First-Rate Bike Computer
The 705 also track your heart rate, cadence, power (from optional ANT + Sport-enabled third-party power meters), climb and descent. Other nifty features include the following:

Virtual Partner lets you race a virtual competitor over a specified distance and speed.
Courses let you race against a previously recorded workout, so you can compare your current and past performances over the same ride.
Auto Pause pauses the timer when you slow down or stop and resumes when you speed up again, so you can focus on your ride.
Customizable computer screen shows up to eight different data fields. The user may customize the display for the size and placement of the data.
Program alerts to sound if the user strays outside the range of speed, heart rate or cadence values. Alerts can also indicate when a set amount of time or distance has passed.
Auto Lap automatically starts a new lap each time you pass a specified location or travel a preset distance
Click stick helps users navigate through the various options.
Full-Featured Navigation
No more scratch paper paper-clipped to your handlebars. In addition to their cycling computer functions, The Edge 705 provides the same robust navigation as Garmin's vehicle navigators, with turn-by-turn spoken directions (turn left in 500 yards) and a 2.2-inch (diagonal) color display that shows maps in great detail.

The device comes pre-loaded with a built-in basemap, and a MicroSD card slot you can use to load new maps or store workout, course and ride data. Garmin has lots of street and topographic maps available for purchase and you can download courses and rides from Garmin or other riders at the Garmin Connect website.

Both feature a high-sensitivity receiver that holds a signal under trees and near tall buildings and have a click stick for easy screen navigation.
Connectivity and "ANT + Sport"
One of Garmin's most ambitious decisions has been to approach fitness devices as a total platform with their "ANT + Sport" connectivity system. All of Garmin's new fitness devices, including the Edge 705, the Forerunner 50 heart rate monitor watches, will interface wirelessly with any devices that are compatible wiht the "ANT + Sport" protocol, including devices from other manufacturers. Currently, Garmin the devices will pair with power meter from SRM or Quarq to measure power – torque and cadence for each leg at the pedals – which is often cited as a true indicator of an efficient ride. It's unclear what other manufacturers will buy into the ANT + Sport platform, but this kind of open connectivity with products from other companies offers a great deal of potential flexibility.

The wireless function also makes it easy to connect one Edge unit to another to share rides, courses and workout data.

Heart Rate and Cadence Monitors
The Edge 705 heart rate monitor uses a robust wireless technology that eliminates cross-talk and interference and delivers real-time heart rate data exclusively to the user’s device. This data is stored with each track point for post-workout analysis. The Edge 705 with speed/cadence sensor incorporates a self-calibrating, wireless speed/cadence sensor that mounts to the rear chain stay of the bicycle.

Be Part of A Community
In 2007, Garmin acquired Motion-based, the largest shared repository of customer-generated gps-based routes, courses and maps. This was a significant move for Garmin to support the gps user community and bring a wealth of route options to gps users. With a simple connection to your computer, you can join a worldwide network of cyclists and outdoor enthusiasts through Garmin Connect our new, one-stop site for data analysis an sharing.

You can also upload to optional Garmin Training Center software for further analysis. Garmin Training Center stores large quanities of workout and ride data. Some of the things you can do are

Review your workout data, including pace/speed, distance, time, calories burned; and if available, heart rate, cadence and detailed elevation.
View a detailed graph of your workout data, plotted over time or distance.
View a map of your workout that shows the exact path you traveled.
Categorize your workout history according to type of activity.
Review previous workouts, which are saved by day and week.
Create customized workouts with specific goals and rest intervals. Then send them to your fitness device.*
Schedule workouts for a specific day with calendar.
Get custom workout templates designed by the experts at TrainingPeaks.com
What's In The Box
Edge 705 gps-enabled cycling computer, heart rate monitor, bike mounts, AC charger, USB cable, Owner's manual on CD-ROM, Quick reference guide

Garmin has really upped the ante on the entire cycling computer category with it's new gps-enabled navigator/computer, the 705. This is a true navigational aid with full-color maps and turn-by-turn directions in addition to advanced route-planning and saving capabilities. On top of that, the 705 adds heart rate and cadence monitors, a barometric altimeter, and wireless capability that lets you share routes and workout data with other riders instantly. Sleek and waterproof, with a 2.2-inch color screen that lets you customize what data you see and how you see it, these two devices help make the most of every ride. The 705 comes in three different models. The basic model comes with a heart-rate monitor. You can also get models that add a speed/cadence sensor, and a supplemental map.

Perform, Navigate, Analyze, and Connect


The Power Of Location-Based Data
Anyone who has used Garmin's original Edge 205 or 305 already understands the power that attaching location data to traditional measurements like distance, speed, time, calories burned, and heart rate can provide. Knowing exactly where you worked hardest, rode fastest (or most slowly) lets you tailor your workouts to improve to improve your riding skills for specific distances, conditions, and types of terrain. It gives a complete picture of how you interact with every portion of your ride.

Altitude is recorded using a barometric altimeter for the Edge 705. This accurate altitude data makes it much easier for cyclists to match their altitude profile with their speed, cadence, and heart rate during post-ride analysis.

A First-Rate Bike Computer
The 705 also track your heart rate, cadence, power (from optional ANT + Sport-enabled third-party power meters), climb and descent. Other nifty features include the following:

Virtual Partner lets you race a virtual competitor over a specified distance and speed.
Courses let you race against a previously recorded workout, so you can compare your current and past performances over the same ride.
Auto Pause pauses the timer when you slow down or stop and resumes when you speed up again, so you can focus on your ride.
Customizable computer screen shows up to eight different data fields. The user may customize the display for the size and placement of the data.
Program alerts to sound if the user strays outside the range of speed, heart rate or cadence values. Alerts can also indicate when a set amount of time or distance has passed.
Auto Lap automatically starts a new lap each time you pass a specified location or travel a preset distance
Click stick helps users navigate through the various options.

Ready for anything--whatever the challenge and whatever the terrain.

Include a wireless heart rate monitor to measure your heart rate and track your heart rate zone.

All wireless with a color display and support for real turn-by-turn navigation.
Full-Featured Navigation
No more scratch paper paper-clipped to your handlebars. In addition to their cycling computer functions, The Edge 705 provides the same robust navigation as Garmin's vehicle navigators, with turn-by-turn spoken directions (turn left in 500 yards) and a 2.2-inch (diagonal) color display that shows maps in great detail.

The device comes pre-loaded with a built-in basemap, and a MicroSD card slot you can use to load new maps or store workout, course and ride data. Garmin has lots of street and topographic maps available for purchase and you can download courses and rides from Garmin or other riders at the Garmin Connect website.

Both feature a high-sensitivity receiver that holds a signal under trees and near tall buildings and have a click stick for easy screen navigation.
Connectivity and "ANT + Sport"
One of Garmin's most ambitious decisions has been to approach fitness devices as a total platform with their "ANT + Sport" connectivity system. All of Garmin's new fitness devices, including the Edge 705, the Forerunner 50 heart rate monitor watches, will interface wirelessly with any devices that are compatible wiht the "ANT + Sport" protocol, including devices from other manufacturers. Currently, Garmin the devices will pair with power meter from SRM or Quarq to measure power – torque and cadence for each leg at the pedals – which is often cited as a true indicator of an efficient ride. It's unclear what other manufacturers will buy into the ANT + Sport platform, but this kind of open connectivity with products from other companies offers a great deal of potential flexibility.

The wireless function also makes it easy to connect one Edge unit to another to share rides, courses and workout data.

Heart Rate and Cadence Monitors
The Edge 705 heart rate monitor uses a robust wireless technology that eliminates cross-talk and interference and delivers real-time heart rate data exclusively to the user’s device. This data is stored with each track point for post-workout analysis. The Edge 705 with speed/cadence sensor incorporates a self-calibrating, wireless speed/cadence sensor that mounts to the rear chain stay of the bicycle.

Be Part of A Community
In 2007, Garmin acquired Motion-based, the largest shared repository of customer-generated gps-based routes, courses and maps. This was a significant move for Garmin to support the gps user community and bring a wealth of route options to gps users. With a simple connection to your computer, you can join a worldwide network of cyclists and outdoor enthusiasts through Garmin Connect our new, one-stop site for data analysis an sharing.

You can also upload to optional Garmin Training Center software for further analysis. Garmin Training Center stores large quanities of workout and ride data. Some of the things you can do are

Review your workout data, including pace/speed, distance, time, calories burned; and if available, heart rate, cadence and detailed elevation.
View a detailed graph of your workout data, plotted over time or distance.
View a map of your workout that shows the exact path you traveled.
Categorize your workout history according to type of activity.
Review previous workouts, which are saved by day and week.
Create customized workouts with specific goals and rest intervals. Then send them to your fitness device.*
Schedule workouts for a specific day with calendar.
Get custom workout templates designed by the experts at TrainingPeaks.com
What's In The Box
Edge 705 gps-enabled cycling computer, heart rate monitor, bike mounts, AC charger, USB cable, Owner's manual on CD-ROM, Quick reference guide

81% (7)
Washington man rides his bike more than 3,000 miles - at age 90
Washington man rides his bike more than 3,000 miles - at age 90
I was thinking about this story today that I wrote for The Romeo Observer back on October 9, 2002..... Washington Township resident Henry Koehler turns 90 years old today and he won’t be celebrating by playing bingo or shuffleboard. He will ride his bike nearly 20 miles around Stony Creek Metropark. “I ride almost every day when the weather is good. I don’t ride in the rain or if it is too windy,” he said. The fair weather bike riding days have added up to nearly 3,000 miles this year. “I even ride in the winter as long as a path is shoveled,” he said. Koehler began bike riding serious distances in 1987 at the tender age of 75 after his wife had died and he was looking for something to do. “I’ve ridden some 50 mile rides. I used to ride 36 miles every other day before I moved to Washington,” he said. Koehler has ridden anywhere from 2,530 miles to 5,225 miles a year with an average of 3,758 miles each year for the past 15 years. He has pedaled his bike 56,383 miles or the equivalent of more than two times around the earth. He measures his mileage with an electronic speedometer/odometer on his handlebars and records his yearly mileage in a little notebook Koehler’s daily routine includes three laps around the lake at Stony Creek which totals around 18 miles. The bike ride is followed by a stroll through the Washington Meijer store and a salad lunch in the cafeteria. His speedometer also records his average speed which he reports is more than 12 mph but he said he has often traveled at a clip of more than 17 mph. “I go pretty fast when I can,” he said. If you want to join Koehler for a lap or two, don’t expect to find him riding on a one speed cruiser bike with wide handlebars, fenders and a big cushy seat. He owns a modern racing style bike complete with 12 gears and skinny tires. He wears a helmet and a bicycling jersey while he rides. His feet are strapped to the pedals with toe clips and straps just like a bike racer. He restricts most of his riding to Stony Creek although he has ridden on organized bicycle tours and with bicycle clubs. “I’d rather ride alone,” he says and winks. “They (other bike riders) are a little too slow for me.” Koehler said that he has noticed himself slowing down a little the past few years. “I used to ride a bike to keep ahead of father time. Now he’s got a bike, too, and he’s catching up with me,” he said. He said that he rarely rides more than 20 miles a day now and that some of the hills in the park seem more difficult to ride over. “I think some of the hills in the park are getting bigger,” he said. He said that his hip joint has been deteriorating the past few years and bothers him occasionally while walking but never while bike riding. Even with the hip complaint, he still walks at the same pace as someone one third his age and he rarely has the need to visit the doctor. Koehler was never athletic during his adult years and spent 46 years working as a pattern maker for automotive industry. “When I was in school I did do some high jumping and played soccer. When you’re a kid, you do a lot of running around,” he said. Upon retirement, he cared for his wife, who suffered from Alzheimer’s disease. He has been asked by several other occasional bike riders in the park if he ever gets bored doing laps at Stony Creek. “I just take it easy and enjoy myself. There is always something that I haven’t seen before,” he said. Published October 9, 2002
362/365: Great Salt Face
362/365: Great Salt Face
So, I snapped this after just finishing my final long ride of the season. I figured I should share the crystallized salt on my face before I got to my shower. Ride Stats: Total Miles: 65 Total Time: 4 hours 36 minutes Total Calories 4960 Average Speed 14.2 mph Average Heart Rate: 155 bpm Average Cadence 45 rpm Achieved all the following maxes during the same burst (way fun) Max Speed 40.8 mph Max Heart Rate: 185 bpm Max Cadence: 115 rpm

average bike riding speed
average bike riding speed
The Lance Armstrong Performance Program: Seven Weeks to the Perfect Ride
A TRAINING PROGRAM SO SIMPLE, IT'S LIKE RIDING A BICYCLE...WITH THE BEST IN THE WORLD!

In 1999 the world watched spellbound as Lance Armstrong achieved one of the most dramatic comebacks in sports history, winning the grueling Tour de France just three years after being diagnosed with advanced testicular cancer. Lance's return road to glory took courage, determination, and a top-notch training program. Now Lance's winning strategies-- developed with coach Chris Carmichael-- can be yours, too! Whether you're a cycling novice or a competitive racer, The Lance Armstrong Training Program will teach you how to:

* find the right bike for your body
* know when to brake (only as a last resort!)
* corner, climb, and descend like a pro
* develop your explosive power to sprint
* incorporate cross-training into your schedule
* build necessary mental toughness...
* and much more!

Simple and focused, Lance's proven program will transform you into the rider you want to be-- in just seven weeks!

It's hard to argue with success; it's even tougher to emulate it. But if you want to train like a Tour de France winner, you couldn't do much better than learning the tricks of the trade from two-time champion (1999 and 2000) Lance Armstrong.
In The Lance Armstrong Performance Program: Seven Weeks to the Perfect Ride, Armstrong teams up with his coach, Chris Carmichael (whom the U.S. Olympic Committee named 1999's Coach of the Year), to offer the ultimate insider's guide to becoming a better rider, based on the regimen Carmichael has been fine-tuning for Armstrong since the early 1990s. Noting that athletes of all levels focus best when aiming for specific goals at the end of short windows, the authors describe the performance program as consisting of "three specialized weekly training programs that build on your current fitness level" followed by a week of "recovery riding between each program." They provide an easy-to-administer fitness-level self-test in the form of a three-mile time trial (beginner, intermediate, or advanced), and they then define the key operative terms that make up the bulk of the actual training, including Tempo, HighSpin, PowerIntervals, Sprints, and Training Zone. A brief section of workbook-style pages provides readers with a user-friendly outline for the entire seven weeks.
Here is week 3 for an intermediate rider:
Monday: day off.
Tuesday: 1 hour in zone 2 with 20 minutes Tempo on flat terrain.
Wednesday: 30 minutes in zone 1; recovery ride.
Thursday: 1 hour in zone 2 with 15 minutes Tempo on flat terrain.
Friday: 45 minutes in zone 2 with 10 minutes HighSpin on flat terrain.
Saturday: 1 hour in zone 2 with 15 minutes Tempo on flat terrain.
Sunday: 1.5 hours in zone 2 with 30 minutes on hilly terrain.
Though clearly the focus, the performance program itself makes up less than a third of the book. Other subjects covered include cycling equipment, essential maintenance and repair, riding in bad weather, road hazards, mental toughness, and the pros' eating habits both on and off the bike, to name just a few. What the book is not is the story of Lance Armstrong's remarkable recovery from testicular cancer (see his autobiography, It's Not About the Bike, for that). Rather, Armstrong and Carmichael have produced a detail-packed training manual, sprinkled with photographs and tales of the racing life, for those who spend a large percentage of their time on two wheels--or dream of it. --Patrick Jennings

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