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2009 Faculty Summit

Attendees

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Tarek Abdelzaher

UIUC


Tarek Abdelzaher received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt, in 1990 and 1994 respectively. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1999 on Quality of Service Adaptation in Real-Time Systems. He has been an Assistant Professor at the University of Virginia, where he founded the Software Predictability Group until 2005. He is currently an Associate Professor at the Department of Computer Science, the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. He has authored/coauthored more than 100 refereed publications in real-time computing, distributed systems, sensor networks, and control. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Real-Time Systems, an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems, the ACM Transaction on Sensor Networks, and the Ad Hoc Networks Journal, as well as Editor of ACM SIGBED Review. He was Program Chair of RTAS 2004 and RTSS 2006, and General Chair of RTAS 2005, IPSN 2007, RTSS 2007, DCoSS 2008 and Sensys 2008. He is currently Program Chair of IPSN 2010 and ICDCS 2010. Abdelzaher's research interests lie broadly in embedded and enterprise computing, energy management, sensor networks, and environmental and medical applications of distributed embedded systems. Tarek Abdelzaher is a member of IEEE and ACM.
Ken Anderson

University of Colorado, Boulder


Ken Anderson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Colorado, Boulder. His research interests lies at the intersection of hypermedia and software engineering. He is also the Chair of the Undergraduate Committee for his Department and has interests in making CS curriculum more attractive to today's students while helping to broaden participation in CS by underrepresented groups.
Jason Baldridge

University of Texas at Austin


Jason Baldridge is an assistant professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Texas at Austin. He is a computational linguist whose core research interests include coreference resolution, natural language grammar and parsing, and active learning for natural language processing tasks. Jason's current projects investigate the potential for semi-automated annotation in documenting endangered languages (funded by the National Science Foun ation), modeling the temporal and discourse structure of written texts (funded by the NSF and the New York Community Trust), and, most recently, joint learning of grammatical dependencies and vector space models of word meaning.
Elizabeth Belding

UC Santa Barbara


Elizabeth M. Belding is a Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Elizabeth's research focuses on mobile networking, specifically mesh networks, multimedia, monitoring, and solutions for networking in under-developed regions. She is the founder of the Mobility Management and Networking (MOMENT) Laboratory (http://moment.cs.ucsb.edu) at UCSB. Elizabeth is the author of over 80 papers related to mobile networking and has served on over 50 program committees for networking conferences. Elizabeth served as the TPC Co-Chair of ACM MobiCom 2005 and IEEE SECON 2005, and the TPC Co-Chair of ACM MobiHoc 2007. She also served on the editorial board for the IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing. Elizabeth is the recipient of an NSF CAREER award, and a 2002 Technology Review 100 award, awarded to the world's top young investigators. See http://www.cs.ucsb.edu/~ebelding for further details.
Shai Ben-David

University of Waterloo


Shai Ben-David grew up in Jerusalem, Israel. He attended the Hebrew University studying physics, mathematics and psychology. He received his PhD for a thesis in set theory (on non-provability of infinite combinatorial statements). Dr. Ben-David was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Toronto in the Mathematics and the Computer Science departments, and in 1987 joined the faculty of the CS Department at the Technion (Israel Institute Technology). He held visiting faculty positions at the Australian National University in Canberra (1997-8) and at Cornell University (2001-2004). In August 2004 he joined the School of Computer Science at the University of Waterloo. Shai's research extends to various aspects of theoretical computer science, including logic, computational complexity, and data mining. In recent years, his focus is on statistical and computational machine learning. Shai is a frequent member of the program committees of most of the leading confereneces in that area (as well as served as program committee chair in several of these) and is (and has been) an editor for various theoretical CS and Machine learning journals.
Ramon Brena

Tecnologico de Monterrey, Mexico


Dr. Ramon F. Brena is full professor at the Center of Intelligent Systems, Tech of Monterrey, Mexico, since 1990, where he is head of a research group in Distributed Knowledge and Multiagent Systems. Dr. Brena holds a PhD from the INPG, Grenoble, France, where he presented a doctoral Thesis related to Knowledge in Program Synthesis. His current research and publication areas include Intelligent Agents and Multiagent Systems, Knowledge management, representation and distribution, Semantic Web, and Artificial Intelligence in general. He has been visiting professor at the U. of Texas at Dallas and the Université de Montréal. Dr Brena is member of the ACM, and is recognized as an established researcher by the official Mexican research agency, CONACyT.
Tevfik Bultan

UC Santa Barbara


Tevfik Bultan is an Associate Professor and the Vice Chair of the Department of Computer Science at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His current research interests are: service oriented computing, concurrency, model checking, static analysis, and software engineering. Tevfik Bultan received his B.S. in electrical and electronics engineering in 1989 from the Middle East Technical University, and his M.S. in computer engineering and information science in 1992 from the Bilkent University, both in Ankara, Turkey. He received his Ph.D. in computer science in 1998 from the University of Maryland, College Park. He joined the Department of Computer Science at the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1998. Tevfik Bultan received a NATO Science Fellowship from the Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK) in 1993, a Regents' Junior Faculty Fellowship from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1999, and a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation in 2000.
Michael Carey

UC Irvine


Michael J. Carey has just reentered academia as a Bren Professor of Information & Computer Sciences at UC Irvine. Prior to his reentry, Dr. Carey was a Senior Engineering Director on the AquaLogic side of BEA Sytems, Inc. (and an Architect at Oracle Corporation after their BEA acquisition). Dr. Carey managed the BEA XQuery engineering team and was chief architect for BEA's AquaLogic Data Services Platform product. Prior to joining BEA in 2001, he spent a dozen years as a University of Wisconsin-Madison Computer Science faculty member, five years as an IBM Almaden database researcher/manager, and a year and a half at an e-commerce software startup, Propel Software, watching the bubble burst firsthand. Dr. Carey is an ACM Fellow, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and a past recipient of the ACM SIGMOD Edgar F. Codd Innovations Award.
Justine Cassell

Northwestern University


Justine Cassell holds the AT&T Research Chair and is a full professor in the departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Communication Studies at Northwestern University, with courtesy appointments in Linguistics, Psychology, and Learning Science.  She is also the director of the Northwestern Center for Technology and Social Behavior, and the director of the doctoral program in Technology and Social Behavior.  Before coming to Northwestern, Cassell was a tenured professor at the MIT Media Lab.  In 2001, Cassell was awarded the Edgerton Faculty Award at MIT; in 2008 she was awarded the Anita Borg Institute Women of Vision Leadership Award; in 2009 Cassell was made an ACM Distinguished Lecturer.  She spent 2008-2009 on sabbatical at the Stanford Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS).  Cassell's research builds on her multidisciplinary background: she holds undergraduate degrees in Comparative Literature from Dartmouth and in Lettres Modernes from the Universite de Besançon (France). She holds a M.Phil in Linguistics from the University of Edinburgh (Scotland) and a double Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in Linguistics and Psychology.  Cassell has most recently published in the areas of Computational Linguistics, Multimodal Interfaces, Artificial Intelligence, Learning Sciences, and HCI.
James Caverlee

Texas A&M University


James Caverlee is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University. Dr. Caverlee directs the Web and Distributed Information Management Lab at Texas A&M and is also affiliated with the Center for the Study of Digital Libraries. His current research focuses on building systems and algorithms for managing and exploiting large amounts of information on the Social Web.
Luis Ceze

University of Washington


Luis Ceze is an Assistant Professor in the Computer Science and Engineering Department at the University of Washington. His research focuses on computer architecture, compiler, programming models and OS to improve the programmability and reliability of multiprocessor systems. He has co-authored over 30 papers in these areas, and had three papers selected as IEEE Micro Top Picks. He participated in the Blue Gene, Cyclops, and PERCS projects at IBM and is a recipient of several IBM awards, including an IBM PhD Fellowship. He obtained his PhD in Computer Science from UIUC in 2007 and has received awards for research and academic accomplishments, including the Ross Martin Award for Outstanding Research Achievement in the College of Engineering, the David Kuck Outstanding PhD Thesis Award, and NSF CAREER Award. He recently co-founded a startup company where he is a part-time consultant.
Abhishek Chandra

University of Minnesota


Abhishek Chandra is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. His research interests are in the areas of Operating Systems, Distributed Systems, and Computer Networks. His current research focus is on resource management issues in large-scale distributed systems such as volunteer Grids, clouds, and data centers. He received his B.Tech. degree in Computer Science and Engineering from IIT Kanpur in 1997, and M.S. and PhD degrees in Computer Science from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2000 and 2005 respectively. He won the US National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award in 2007. His PhD dissertation titled "Resource Allocation for Self-Managing Servers" was nominated for the ACM Dissertation Award in 2005, and he was a co-author on the Best Student Paper at IEEE ICAC'05. He is a member of ACM, IEEE, and USENIX.
Mark Chang

Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering


Mark received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Washington, his M.S. in electrical and computer engineering from Northwestern University, and his B.S. from Johns Hopkins University. Mark has traditionally been interested in high performance embedded computing, reconfigurable computing with FGPAs, and software tools for hardware designers. More recently, his interests lean toward human-computer interactions, low-power embedded and ubiquitous computing, computing for healthcare, and mobile devices.
Nate Clark

Georgia Tech


Nate Clark received his Ph.D. in Computer Science and Engineering from the University of Michigan in 2007, and joined Georgia Tech.'s faculty after graduation. Nate's research interests broadly lie in backend compilation and computer architecture. Currently he is investigating how to use compilers and architecture to make efficient software easier to develop for heterogeneous manycore processors. When not "defining the new face of computing", he'd probably like to be playing tennis or at a techno show.
Landon Cox

Duke University


Landon Cox is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Duke University and a recipient of an NSF CAREER award and an IBM Faculty Award. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 2005. Landon's current research interests include operating systems, distributed systems, and mobile computing.
Amol Deshpande

University of Maryland


Amol Deshpande is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Maryland at College Park. He received his PhD from University of California at Berkeley in 2004, and his bachelors degree from IIT Bombay in 1998. His research interests include query optimization, adaptive query processing, sensor network data management, scalable statistical modeling of data, and uncertain data management. His current research is focused on addressing the challenges in managing and querying the inherently noisy, incomplete, and uncertain data generated in domains such as sensor networks, data streams, data integration, information extraction, and social networks. Prof. Deshpande received the best paper award at the International Conference on Very Large Databases (VLDB), 2004, for his work on “Model-driven Data Acquisition in Sensor Networks”. He is also a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award.
Yanlei Diao

University of Massachusetts Amherst


Yanlei Diao is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Computer Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst. Her research interests are in information architectures and data management systems, with a focus on data streams, uncertain data management, sensor data management, flash databases, and XML query processing. She received her PhD in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley in 2005. Yanlei is a recipient of the NSF CAREER award and a finalist for the Microsoft Research New Faculty Fellowship. She was invited to speak at the Distinguished Faculty Lecture Series at the University of Texas at Austin in December 2005. Her PhD dissertation “Query Processing for Large-Scale XML Message Brokering” won the 2006 ACM-SIGMOD Dissertation Award Honorable Mention. She has served on the program committees for many international conferences and workshops. She is a main contributor to YFilter 1.0 a high-performance filtering system over XML message streams.
Chen Ding

University of Rochester


Chen Ding is an associate professor of computer science at University of Rochester, Rochester, NY. His research seeks to understand the composite and emergent behavior in complex computer systems, including program locality and scalability, reference affinity, and program phases. Based on behavior models, his group develops software techniques for program transformation, memory management, and recently suggestion-based dynamic program parallelization and optimization. More information about his work can be found at http://www.cs.rochester.edu/~cding.
Dejing Dou

University of Oregon


Dejing Dou is an Assistant Professor in the Computer and Information Science Department at the University of Oregon and leads the Advanced Integration and Mining (AIM) Lab (http://aimlab.cs.uoregon.edu/). He received his bachelor degree from Tsinghua University, China in 1996 and his Ph.D. degree from Yale University in 2004. His research areas include ontologies, information integration, data mining, biomedical informatics and the Semantic Web. He has published a number of papers, some of which appear in prestigious conferences and journals like KDD, SDM, ISWC, ODBASE and JoDS. In addition to serving on numerous program committees, he has been invited as panelist by NSF several times, and as an expert for grant review by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). His research has been funded or recommended for funding by NSF and NIH.
Steve Engels

University of Toronto


Steve Engels is a senior lecturer in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Toronto. His recent work has been in the areas of video game design, and computer science education and outreach. He also has research interests in artificial intelligence, with leanings towards machine learning and natural language processing.
Katrin Erk

University of Texas at Austin


Katrin Erk is an assistant professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Texas at Austin. She completed her dissertation on tree description languages and ellipsis at Saarland University in 2002, under the supervision of Gert Smolka. From 2002 to 2006, she held a researcher position in the Salsa project at Saarland University, working on manual and automatic meaning analysis of natural language text. Her current research focuses on computational models for word meaning and the automatic acquisition of lexical information from text corpora.
Eleazar Eskin

UCLA


Eleazar Eskin is an Assistant Professor in the Computer Science and Human Genetics departments at the University of California Los Angeles.  Eleazar completed his Ph. D. in the Computer Science Department of Columbia University in New York City. Eleazar's current research interests are in the relationship between human variation and human disease. His group's research attempts to understand the genetic basis of disease by analyzing human variation data and attempting to discover functional variants which contribute to disease. His research focuses on developing techniques for solving the challenging computational problems that arise in attempting to understand the genetic basis of human disease.
Deborah Estrin

UCLA


Deborah Estrin is a Professor of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at UCLA. She holds the Jon Postel Chair in Computer Networks, and is Founding Director of the National Science Foundation funded Center for Embedded Networked Sensing (CENS). CENS’ mission is to explore and develop innovative, end-to-end, distributed sensing systems, across an array of scientifically and socially relevant applications, from ecosystems to human systems. Estrin is currently exploring Mobile Personal Sensing systems that leverage the location, acoustic, image, and attached-sensor data streams increasingly available globally from mobile phones; with particular emphasis on human and environmental health applications and on privacy-aware architectures. Estrin’s earlier research addressed Internet protocol design and scaling, in particular, inter-domain and multicast routing. She received her PhD in 1985 from MIT and her BS in 1980 from UC Berkeley, both in EECS. Estrin currently serves on the National Research Council’s Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) and was previously a member of the NSF National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) Advisory board, the NSF CISE Advisory Committee, and DARPA-ISAT. Estrin was selected as the first ACM-W Athena Lecturer in 2006 and was awarded the Anita Borg Institute’s Women of Vision Award for Innovation in 2007. She was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2007 and to the National Academy of Engineering in 2009. She is a fellow of the IEEE, ACM, and AAAS and was granted Doctor Honoris Causa from EPFL in 2008.
Christos Faloutsos

CMU


Christos Faloutsos is a Professor at Carnegie Mellon University. He has received the Presidential Young Investigator Award by the National Science Foundation (1989), the Research Contributions Award in ICDM 2006, twelve ``best paper'' awards, and several teaching awards. He has served as a member of the executive committee of SIGKDD; he has published over 200 refereed articles, 11 book chapters and one monograph. He holds five patents and he has given over 30 tutorials and over 10 invited distinguished lectures. His research interests include data mining for graphs and streams, fractals, database performance, and indexing for multimedia and bio-informatics data.
Alexandra Fedorova

Simon Fraser University


Alexandra (Sasha) Fedorova is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Simon Fraser University (SFU) in Vancouver, Canada. She has earned her Ph.D. at Harvard University in 2006, where she has completed a thesis on Operating System Scheduling for Chip Multithreaded Processors. Concurrently with her doctorate studies, Fedorova worked at Sun Microsystems Research Labs, where she investigated transactional memory and operating systems. She is the lead inventor on two US patents. At SFU, Dr. Fedorova has co-founded Systems, Networking and Architecture (SYNAR) research lab. Presently, her research interests span operating systems and virtualization platforms for multi-core. Recently she and her students have been working on tools and techniques for parallelization of video games. Dr. Fedorova’s research is recognized by researchers and practitioners alike. Her work is supported by Sun Microsystems, Intel and Electronic Arts. She also holds a prestigious Strategic Grant from the Canadian government. Dr. Fedorova enjoys participating in outreach activities for women and minorities.
James Fogarty

University of Washington


James Fogarty is an Assistant Professor in the University of Washington's Department of Computer Science & Engineering and an active member of the DUB Group, the University of Washington's cross-campus initiative advancing Human-Computer Interaction and Design research and practice. His broad research interests are in Human-Computer Interaction, User Interface Software and Technology, and Ubiquitous Computing, with a more specific focus on developing, deploying, and evaluating new approaches to the human obstacles surrounding widespread everyday adoption of ubiquitous sensing and intelligent computing technologies. He has recently examined these questions in the context of our CueFlik system supporting mixed-initiative end-user interactive concept learning in Web image search, mixed-initiative information extraction in Wikipedia with the Kylin system, our GESTALT system addressing obstacles to software developer adoption of statistical machine learning techniques, and our development of practical and unobtrusive approaches to whole-home activity sensing.
Armando Fox

UC Berkeley


Bio for Armando Fox http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~fox Armando Fox (fox@cs.berkeley.edu) is an Adjunct Associate Professor at UC Berkeley and a co-founder of the Berkeley RAD Lab. Prior to that he was an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Stanford. His recent collaboration with David Patterson on Recovery-Oriented Computing earned him the distinction of being included in the ""Scientific American 50"" of 2003; he is also the recipient of an NSF CAREER award and teaching awards from Stanford University, the Society of Women Engineers, and Tau Beta Pi. In previous lives he helped design the Intel Pentium Pro microprocessor and founded a small company to commercialize his UC Berkeley dissertation research on mobile computing. He received his other degrees in electrical engineering and computer science from MIT and the University of Illinois.
Michael Franklin

UC Berkeley


Michael Franklin is a Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley and the Co-Founder and CTO of Truviso, Inc., a leading provider of next-generation data analytics. At Berkeley, where he has been on the faculty since 1999, his research focuses on the architecture and performance of distributed data management and information systems. His recent projects cover the areas of wireless sensor networks, pay-as-you-go data integration, data stream processing, cloud computing, and data management for the digital home. Earlier in his career, he worked as a database systems developer on compressed data structures and highly-parallel database systems. Dr. Franklin serves on the Board of Trustees of the VLDB Endowment, and has served on Technical Advisory Boards for technology companies including: Appstream (SYMC), Business Signatures (ENTU), DATAllegro (MSFT), and WiseNut (LOOK). He is a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery, and a recipient of the National Science Foundation Career Award and the ACM SIGMOD "Test of Time" award. He earned a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1993, an M.S.E. from the Wang Institute of Graduate Studies in 1986, and a B.S. in Computer and Information Science from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 1983. He is a 2009 recipient of the Outstanding Alumni Achievement award from the UMass Computer Science Department.
Michael Freedman

Princeton University


Michael J. Freedman is an Assistant Professor in the Computer Science Department at Princeton University. His research focuses on many aspects of distributed and networked systems, security, networking, and applied cryptography. He developed and operates several self-managing systems---including CoralCDN, a decentralized content distribution network, and OASIS, an open anycast service---which serve more than a million users daily.
Dan Garcia

UC Berkeley


Dan Garcia is a Lecturer SOE in the Computer Science Division of the EECS Department at the University of California, Berkeley, and joined the Cal faculty in the fall of 2000. He has won the departmental Diane S. McEntyre Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2002, the departmental Information Technology Faculty Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching in 2004, and was chosen as a UC Berkeley "Unsung Hero" in 2005. He is currently mentoring over seventy undergraduates spread across four groups he founded in 2001 centered around his research, art and development interests in computer graphics, Macintosh OS X programming, computational game theory and computer science education. On the fun side, he can dance DDR level 7, play the harmonica, juggle 5 balls, score in the low 90s on the links, spin things on his finger and knows all the words to many old-school raps, stand-up comedy bits and Monty Python sketches.
Darren Gergle

Northwestern University


Darren Gergle is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Studies with a courtesy appointment in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Northwestern University. He received his Ph.D. in Human-Computer Interaction from the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. His research program focuses on establishing a theoretical understanding of human communication and collaboration, and using this understanding to develop novel collaborative technologies.
Kristen Grauman

University of Texas at Austin


Kristen Grauman is an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. She received her Ph.D. from MIT in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in 2006. Her research interests are in computer vision and machine learning, and current projects focus on scalable methods for visual search and recognition.
Bill Gribbons

Bentley University


Dr. Gribbons is Director of the graduate Human Factors program at Bentley University, Waltham, Massachusetts. In 2002, he was named Distinguished Professor of Human Factors in recognition of his contributions to the university and the profession.  In 1999, Dr. Gribbons founded the Design and Usability Center at Bentley, and continues to hold a senior consulting role. For over twenty-five years he has provided testing services, UX consulting, and seminars to a diverse range of corporate clients around the world in the software, hardware, services and Web communities. Dr. Gribbons received his Ph.D. from the University of Maryland. He is an Associate Fellow of the Society for Technical Communication (STC) and was a member of the Technical Communication Editorial Board. He has appeared on, and been quoted by, local and national media including the Associated Press, the Boston Globe, Boston Business Journal, Computerworld, Mass High Tech, U.S. News & World Report, USA Today, the Washington Times, East Bay Business Times, ABC “20-20”, Business 2.0, a nationally syndicated radio show (A Touch of Grey), Investor Business Daily, and the Atlanta Journal Constitution. His long-term research interests center on the building of a unified theory defining the user experience and the promotion of user experience as a guiding business strategy.
Dan Grossman

University of Washington


Dan Grossman is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington. His research in the design and implementation of programming languages is aimed at improving software quality. He has focused on easier-to-use synchronization constructs and type-safe low-level languages.
Xiaohui (Helen) Gu

North Carolina State University


Dr. Xiaohui (Helen) Gu is an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science at the North Carolina State University. She received a PhD degree in 2004 and a MS degree in 2001 from the Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She received a BS degree in computer science from Peking University, Beijing, China in 1999. She was a research staff member at IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Hawthorne, New York, between 2004 and 2007. Dr. Gu received ILLIAC fellowship, David J. Kuck Best Master Thesis Award, and Saburo Muroga Fellowship from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She also received the IBM Invention Achievement Awards in 2004, 2006, and 2007. She has filed eight patents, and has published more than 30 research papers in international journals and major peer-reviewed conference proceedings. Dr. Gu is a recipient of IBM Faculty Award 2008 and NCSU Faculty Research and Professional Development Award 2008.
Anupam Gupta

CMU


Anupam Gupta is an Associate Professor in the Computer Science Department at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his degrees from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur and the University of California, Berkeley. He joined Carnegie Mellon University after spending two years at Lucent Bell Labs in Murray Hill, New Jersey. His research interests are in the area of theoretical Computer Science, primarily in developing approximation algorithms for NP-hard optimization problems, and understanding the algorithmic properties of metric spaces. He is the recipient of an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, and an NSF Career award.
Rajesh Gupta

UCSD


Rajesh Gupta is QUALCOMM professor in Computer Science & Engineering at UC San Diego, California. He received his B. Tech. in Electrical Engineering from IIT Kanpur in 1984, MS in EECS from UC Berkeley in 1986 and a Ph. D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford in 1994. Earlier he worked at Intel Corporation, Santa Clara and on the Computer Science faculty at University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and UC Irvine. His current research is focused on energy efficient and mobile computing issues in embedded systems. In recent years, Gupta and his students have received a best paper award at IEEE/ACM DCOSS’08 and a best demonstration award at IEEE/ACM IPSN/SPOTS’05. He has served as EIC of IEEE Design & Test of Computers and chair of the steering committee of IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing. Gupta is a Fellow of the IEEE.
Brian Harvey

UC Berkeley


Brian Harvey teaches Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (the first course for CS majors) and Social Implications of Computers at the University of California, Berkeley. A former high school teacher and current elementary school volunteer, he has a strong interest in the use of computers in K-12 education, and is author of Computer Science Logo Style, a set of books aimed at teenagers.
Kim Hazelwood

University of Virginia


Kim Hazelwood received her Ph.D. in computer science from Harvard University in 2004, and has been an Assistant Professor at the University of Virginia since 2005. Her research lies at the interface of hardware and software, where she focuses on virtual execution environments, their applications, and their implementation. Prior to joining UVa, Kim held a post-doctoral position with the Intel Pin team, and she continues to collaborate with Intel as a faculty consultant. She has also contributed to several similar projects over 10 years, including HP Dynamo, CarbonFire, DELI, DynamoRIO, and IBM Jikes RVM. Kim has published over 25 peer-reviewed articles relating to architecture, compilers and virtual machines. She has served on over a dozen program committees, including PLDI, MICRO, and PACT, and is the program chair of CGO 2010. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the FEST Distinguished Young Investigator Award for Excellence in Science and Technology, an NSF CAREER Award, a Woodrow Wilson Career Enhancement Fellowship, and research awards from Microsoft, Google, NSF, and the SRC.
Martial Hebert

CMU


Martial Hebert is a Professor in the Robotics Institute at Carnegie-Mellon University. His interest includes computer vision, especially recognition in images and video data, model building and object recognition from 3D data, and perception for mobile robots. His group has developed new approaches for object recognition and scene analysis in images and in video sequences.
Robert Holte

University of Alberta


Dr. Robert Holte is a professor in the Computing Science Department and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Science at the University of Alberta. He is a well-known member of the international machine learning research community, former editor-in-chief of a leading international journal in this field (""Machine Learning""), and past director of the Alberta Ingenuity Centre for Machine Learning (AICML). His main scientific contributions are his seminal works on the performanceof very simple classification rules and a technique (""cost curves"") for cost-sensitive evaluation of classifiers. In addition to machine learning he undertakes research in single-agent search (pathfinding), in particular, the use of automatic abstraction techniques to speed up search. He has over 75 scientific papers to his credit, covering both pure and applied research, and has served on the steering committee or program committee of numerous major international AI conferences.
Hans-Arno Jacobsen

University of Toronto


Hans-Arno Jacobsen holds the Bell University Laboratories Chair in Software, and he is a faculty member in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Computer Science at the University of Toronto, where he leads the Middleware Systems Research Group. His principal areas of research include the design and the development of middleware systems, distributed systems, and information systems. Arno's current research focus lies publish/subscribe, content-based routing, event processing, and aspect-orientation. Arno received his Ph.D. degree from Humboldt University, Berlin in 1999 and his M.A.Sc. degree from the University of Karlsruhe, Germany in 1994. Between 1992 and 1998 Arno engaged in pre-doctoral research activities working at various research laboratories, world-wide. including LIFIA in Grenoble, France, ICSI in Berkeley, U.S., and LBNL in Berkeley, U.S. After completing his doctorate from 1998 to 1999, Arno engaged in post-doctoral research at INRIA in Rocquencourt, France, before joining the University of Toronto in 2001. Arno has served as program committee member of various international conferences, including ICDCS, ICDE, Middleware, SIGMOD, OOPSLA and VLDB. He was the Program Chair of the 5th International Middleware Conference and the General Chair of the Inaugural International Conference on Distributed Event-Based Systems 2007. He is among the initiators of the DEBS conference series and the Event-based.org research portal.
Michael Jordan

UC Berkeley


Michael Jordan is the Pehong Chen Distinguished Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the Department of Statistics at the University of California, Berkeley. He received his Masters from Arizona State University, and earned his PhD in 1985 from the University of California, San Diego. He was a professor at MIT from 1988 to 1998. He has published widely in computer science, electrical engineering, statistics, statistical genetics, computational biology and cognitive science. His research in recent years has focused on nonparametric Bayesian analysis, probabilistic graphical models, spectral methods, kernel machines and applications to problems in computational biology, information retrieval, signal processing and speech recognition. Prof. Jordan was named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 2006 and was named a Medallion Lecturer of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics (IMS) in 2004. He is a Fellow of the IMS, a Fellow of the IEEE, a Fellow of the AAAI and a Fellow of the ASA.
David Karger

MIT


David R. Karger is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. He earned his Ph.D. at Stanford University in 1994 and has since contributed to many areas of computer science, publishing in algorithms, machine learning, information retrieval, personal information management, networking, peer to peer systems, coding theory, and human-computer interaction. A general interest has been to make it easier for people to create, find, organize, manipulate, and share information. His Haystack group researches tools that get flex and personalize their representations and interfaces to reflect the needs of their users. He also helps lead MIT's SIMILE project, a collaboration with MIT Libraries and the World Wide Web consortium developing Semantic-Web tools to improve the management and retrieval of information for institutions and individuals.
Randy Katz

UC Berkeley


Randy Howard Katz received his undergraduate degree from Cornell University, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. He joined the Berkeley faculty in 1983, where since 1996 he has been the United Microelectronics Corporation Distinguished Professor in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. He is a Fellow of the ACM and the IEEE, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  He has published over 250 refereed technical papers, book chapters, and books. His textbook, Contemporary Logic Design, has sold over 100,000 copies in two editions, and has been used at over 200 colleges and universities. He has supervised 45 M.S. theses and 39 Ph.D. dissertations (including one ACM Dissertation Award winner and ten women).   While on leave for government service in 1993-1994, he established whitehouse.gov and connected the White House to the Internet. His current research interest is the architecture of Internet Datacenters, particularly frameworks for datacenter-scale instrumentation and resource management. Prior research interests have included: database management, VLSI CAD, high performance multiprocessor (Snoop cache coherency protocols) and storage (RAID) architectures, transport (Snoop TCP) and mobility protocols spanning heterogeneous wireless networks, and converged data and telephony network and service architectures.
Srinivasan Keshav

University of Waterloo


S. Keshav is a Professor and Canada Research Chair in Tetherless Computing at the School of Computer Science, University of Waterloo, Canada. Earlier in his career has was a researcher at Bell Labs, an Associate Professor at Cornell, and a co-founder of Ensim Corporation, a Silicon Valley startup. He is the author of a widely used graduate textbook on computer networking and has been awarded the Director's Gold Medal at IIT Delhi, the Sakrison Prize at UC Berkeley, and the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship. His current interests are in infrastructural issues underlying tetherless computing. Keshav received a B.Tech from the Indian Institute of Delhi in 1986 and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1991, both in Computer Science.
Christoph Koch

Cornell University


Christoph Koch is an associate professor of computer science at Cornell University, specializing in data management. His current research interests include query processing, managing large amounts of uncertain and probabilistic data, data integration, and scalable games and simulations.
Daphne Koller

Stanford


Daphne Koller is a Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University. Her main research focus is in developing and using machine learning and probabilistic methods to model and analyze complex systems, and she is particularly interested in using these techniques to understand biological systems and the world around us. Professor Koller is the author of over 100 refereed publications, which have appeared in venues that include Science, Nature Genetics, and the Journal of Games and Economic Behavior. She is a Fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence, and has received a number of awards, including the Sloan Foundation Faculty Fellowship in 1996, the ONR Young Investigator Award in 1998, the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) from President Clinton in 1999, the IJCAI Computers and Thought Award in 2001, the Cox Medal for excellence in fostering undergraduate research at Stanford in 2003, the MacArthur Foundation Fellowship in 2004 and the first-ever ACM/Infosys award in 2008.
Christos Kozyrakis

Stanford


Christos Kozyrakis is an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science at Stanford University. He received a BS degree from the University of Crete (Greece) and a PhD degree from the University of California at Berkeley (USA), both in Computer Science. Kozyrakis works on architectures, runtime environments, and programming models for parallel computer systems. At Berkeley, he developed the IRAM architecture, a novel media-processor system that combined vector processing with embedded DRAM technology. At Stanford, he lead the Transactional Coherence and Consistency (TCC) project at Stanford that developed hardware and software mechanisms for programming with transactional memory. He has also investigated security systems and power management, modeling, and benchmarking techniques for data-centers. Currently, he is a member of the Pervasive Parallelism Lab, a multi-faculty effort to make parallel computing practical for the masses. Kozyrakis is a senior member of the ACM and the IEEE. He has received the NSF Career Award, an IBM Faculty Award, the Okawa Fundantion Research Grant, and a Noyce Family Faculty Scholarship.
Andrea Lawrence

Spelman College


Biography not provided
Adam Lee

University of Pittsburgh


Dr. Adam J. Lee is currently an assistant professor of Computer Science at the University of Pittsburgh. He received the MS and PhD degrees in Computer Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2005 and 2008, respectively. Prior to that, he received his BS in Computer Science from Cornell University. His research interests lie at the intersection of the computer security, privacy, and distributed systems fields. He is particularly interested in trust management approaches to authorization, which can be used to facilitate secure interactions across multiple security domains while still preserving each individual's privacy and autonomy.
Baoxin Li

Arizona State University


Baoxin Li received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park, in 2000. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe. He was previously a Senior Researcher with SHARP Laboratories of America (SLA), where he was the Technical Lead in developing SHARP’s Hi-Impact Sports™ technologies. He was also an adjunct faculty member with the Portland State University from 2003 to 2004. He received twice SLA’s President’s Award in 2001 and 2004 respectively, and the Inventor of the Year Award in 2002. He is the recipient of the 2008-2009 National Science Foundation CAREER Award. His research interests include pattern recognition, computer vision, multimedia processing, and statistical methods in visual computing.
Calvin Lin

University of Texas at Austin


Calvin Lin is an Associate Professor at the University of Texas, where he is also the Director of their CS department's Turing Scholars Honors Program. Calvin's research interests are in compilers and parallelism, although he also likes to dabble in micro-architecture.
Anna Lysyanskaya

Brown University


Anna Lysyanskaya is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Brown University. She received an A.B. in Computer Science and Mathematics from Smith College in 1997, and a Ph.D. in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering from MIT in 2002. She is a recipient of an NSF CAREER award and a Sloan Foundation fellowship. Her research interests are in cryptography, theoretical computer science, and computer security.
Maja Mataric

University of Southern California


Maja Mataric´ is a professor of Computer Science and Neuroscience at the University of Southern California, founding director of the USC Center for Robotics and Embedded Systems (cres.usc.edu), co-director of the USC Robotics Research Lab (robotics.usc.edu) and Senior Associate Dean for Research in the USC Viterbi School of Engineering. She also recently served as the elected president of the USC faculty and the Academic Senate. She received her PhD in Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence from MIT in 1994, MS in Computer Science from MIT in 1990, and BS in Computer Science from the University of Kansas in 1987. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and recipient of the Okawa Foundation Award, NSF Career Award, the MIT TR100 Innovation Award, the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society Early Career Award, the USC Viterbi School of Engineering Service Award and Junior Research Award, the Provost's Center for Interdisciplinary Research Fellowship, and is featured in the science documentary movie "Me & Isaac Newton."  Prof. Mataric´ is actively involved in K-12 educational outreach, having obtained federal and corporate grants to develop free open-source curricular materials for elementary and middle-school robotics courses in order to engage student interest in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) topics. Her Interaction Lab's research into socially assistive robotics is aimed at endowing robots with the ability to help people through individual assistance (for convalescence, rehabilitation, training, and education) and team cooperation (for habitat monitoring and emergency response). Her current research is developing robot-assisted therapies for children with autism spectrum disorders, stroke survivors, and individuals with Alzheimer's Disease and other forms of dementia. Details about her research are found at http://robotics.usc.edu/interaction/.
Aditya Mathur

Purdue University


Aditya Mathur conducts research in the areas of software testing, reliability, and formal approaches for software process control. Mathur has been a crusader for the use of code coverage criteria in the estimation of software reliability or as an orthogonal metric to assess confidence in the reliability estimates. He has proposed the ""Saturation Effect"" as a motivating device for quantitative test assessment using an increasingly powerful suite of criteria. This device is often used by vendors to enhance marketing of their test tools. Mathur, in collaboration with Raymond DeCarlo, has pioneered research into the use of feedback control in software development.
Kathryn McKinley

University of Texas at Austin


Professor McKinley received her Ph.D. from Rice University in 1992 working with Ken Kennedy. Her research interests include compilers, memory management, runtime systems, programming languages, debugging, and architecture. She and her collaborators have produced a number of tools that are in wide research and industrial use: the DaCapo Java Benchmarks, the TRIPS Compiler, the Hoard memory manager, and the MMTk garbage collection toolkit. Professor McKinley is an ACM Fellow. She is currently co-Editor-in-Chief of ACM Transactions on Programming Language Systems (TOPLAS). She served as the Treasurer/Secretary for SIGPLAN (1999-2001). She was the program chair for PLDI 2007, PACT 2005, and ASPLOS 2004. Her honors include IBM Faculty Awards, College of Natural Science's Dean's Fellow, and an NSF CAREER Award. She has mentored in CRA-W/CDC programs and serves on the CRA-W Board. She is currently supervising six and has graduated ten PhD students.
Claudia Medeiros

UNICAMP, Brazil


Claudia Bauzer Medeiros is full professor of Computer Science at the University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Brazil, having received awards for research, teaching, and work concerning women and IT. Her research is centered on design and development of scientific databases, with emphasis on agro-environmental planning and biodiversity. She was the President of the Brazilian Computer Society for 4 years. In 2008, she was awarded the Brazilian Order of Scientific Merit (grade Commander). For publications, projects, and students supervised, see http://www.ic.unicamp.br/~cmbm
Atif Memon

University of Maryland


Atif M. Memon is an Associate Professor at the Department of Computer Science, University of Maryland. He received his BS in Computer Science in 1991, his MS in Computer Science in 1995, and his PhD in Computer Science from the University of Pittsburgh. He was awarded a Gold Medal during his undergraduate education, and received fellowships from the Andrew Mellon Foundation for his Ph.D. research. In 1995, he received the NSF CAREER award, which is providing five years of support for his research aimed at enhancing testing techniques for event-driven software. His research interests include program testing, software engineering, artificial intelligence, plan generation, reverse engineering, and program structures. He is a member of the ACM and the IEEE Computer Society and serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Software Testing, Verification, and Reliability (STVR), The Open Software Engineering Journal, and the Canadian Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences. He has served on numerous National Science Foundation panels. He is currently serving on a National Academy of Sciences panel as an expert in the area of Computer Science and Information Technology, for the Pakistan-U.S. Science and Technology Cooperative Program, sponsored by United States Agency for International Development (USAID).
Todd Millstein

UCLA


Todd Millstein is an Associate Professor in the Computer Science Department at the University of California, Los Angeles.  His research aims to make software systems easier to create, maintain, understand, and validate.  Todd received his Ph.D. and M.S. from the University of Washington and his A.B. from Brown University, all in Computer Science.  He received an NSF CAREER award in 2006 and an IBM Faculty Award in 2008.
Priya Narasimhan

CMU


Prof. Priya Narasimhan is an Associate Professor with the Electrical & Computer Engineering Department, and a Director of the Mobility Research Center, at Carnegie Mellon. Her research interests lie in the fields of dependable distributed systems, embedded systems and mobile systems. Her research has earned her a Alfred Sloan Fellowship, the 2009 Carnegie Science Center's Emerging Female Scientist Award, an NSF CAREER Award, a Best Paper Award, the 2001 UCSB Lancaster Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation Award and two IBM Faculty Partnership Awards. She teaches the introductory embedded real-time systems course, the capstone embedded-systems design course and a sports technology course at Carnegie Mellon. Her teaching has earned her the 2008 Eta Kappa Nu (Carnegie Mellon Sigma Chapter) Excellence in Teaching Award.
John Ousterhout

Stanford


John Ousterhout is Professor (Research) of Computer Science at Stanford University. His current research focuses around Web application development. Ousterhout's prior positions include 14 years in industry where he founded two companies (Scriptics and Electric Cloud), preceded by 14 years as Professor of Computer Science at U.C. Berkeley. He is the creator of the Tcl scripting language and is also well known for his work in distributed operating systems and file systems. Ousterhout received a BS degree in Physics from Yale University and a PhD in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has received numerous awards, including the ACM Software System Award, the ACM Grace Murray Hopper Award, the National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, and the U.C. Berkeley Distinguished Teaching Award.
John Owens

UC Davis


John Owens is an associate professor at UC Davis in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He leads a research group that focuses on parallel computation, both hardware and software, and specifically on GPU computing (GPGPU). John graduated from Stanford University with a PhD in electrical engineering in 2002 and from the University of California, Berkeley with a BS in EECS in 1995.
Donald Patterson

UC Irvine


Don is an assistant professor in the Department of Informatics at UCI. He works at the intersection of Artificial Intelligence, Ubiquitous Computing and HCI. He is the director of the Laboratory for Ubiquitous Computing and Interaction. He like organic vegetable gardening, making cheese, micro-roast coffee, jogging, and children's literature.
Zoran Popovic

University of Washington


Zoran Popovic is an Associate Professor in computer science at University of Washington. He received a Sc.B. with Honors from Brown University, and M.S. and Ph.D in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University. He has held research positions at Sun Microsystems and Justsystem Research Center and University of California at Berkeley. Zoran's research interests lie in computer animation and scientific games. His focus in computer animation is on primarily in physically based modeling, high-fidelity human modeling, and control of realistic natural motion. He recently lead the design of Foldit, the scientific discovery game that leverages human ability to solve 3D puzzles, and is recently leading the effort to design a game around the entire early mathematics curriculum. His contributions to the field of computer graphics have been recognized by a number of awards including the NSF CAREER Award, Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship and ACM SIGGRAPH Significant New Researcher Award.
Pascal Poupart

University of Waterloo


Pascal Poupart received the B.Sc. in Mathematics and Computer Science at McGill University, Montreal (Canada) in 1998, the M.Sc. in Computer Science at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada) in 2000 and the Ph.D. in Computer Science at the University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada) in 2005. He joined the David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science at the University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada) as an Assistant Professor in 2004 and became an associate professor in 2009. His research focuses on the development of algorithms for reasoning under uncertainty and machine learning with application to Assistive Technologies, Natural Language Processing and Information Retrieval. He is most well known for his contributions to the development of approximate scalable algorithms for partially observable Markov decision processes (POMDPs) and their applications in real-world problems, including automated prompting for people with dementia for the task of handwashing and spoken dialog management. Other notable projects that his research team are currently working on include a smart walker to assist older people and a wearable sensor system to assess and monitor the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. Pascal Poupart received the Early Researcher Award, a competitive honor for top Ontario researchers, awarded by the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation in 2008. He was also a co-recipient of the Best Paper Award Runner Up at the 2008 Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (UAI) and the IAPR Best Paper Award at the 2007 International Conference on Computer Vision Systems (ICVS). He is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research (JAIR). He routinely serves on the program committee of several premier international conferences in Artificial Intelligence, including IJCAI, AAAI, UAI, ICML, NIPS, AI&STATS and AAMAS. His research partners include Google, Intel, AideRSS, the Alzheimer Association, the UW-Schlegel Research Institute for Aging, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre in Toronto, the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and the Intelligent Assistive Technology and Systems Laboratory at the University of Toronto.
Michael Reiter

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Michael Reiter is the Lawrence M. Slifkin Distinguished Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). He received the B.S. degree in mathematical sciences from UNC in 1989, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from Cornell University in 1991 and 1993, respectively. He joined AT&T Bell Labs in 1993 and became a founding member of AT&T Labs – Research when NCR and Lucent Technologies (including Bell Labs) were split away from AT&T in 1996. He then returned to Bell Labs in 1998 as Director of Secure Systems Research. In 2001, he joined Carnegie Mellon University as a Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering and Computer Science, where he was also the founding Technical Director of CyLab. He joined the faculty at UNC in 2007. Dr. Reiter's research interests include all areas of computer and communications security and distributed computing. He regularly publishes and serves on conference organizing committees in these fields, and has served as program chair for the flagship computer security conferences of the IEEE, the ACM, and the Internet Society. He presently serves on the editorial board of Communications of the ACM, and he has previously served as Editor-in-Chief of ACM Transactions on Information and System Security and on the editorial boards of IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing, and the International Journal of Information Security. He presently serves on the Board of Visitors for the Software Engineering Institute, and on the Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee for the United States Department of Commerce. Dr. Reiter was named an ACM Fellow in 2008.
Mitchel Resnick

MIT


Mitchel Resnick, Professor of Learning Research at the MIT Media Lab, develops new technologies to engage people (especially children) in creative learning experiences. His Lifelong Kindergarten research group developed the "programmable bricks" that were the basis for the LEGO MindStorms robotics construction kits. Resnick co-founded the Computer Clubhouse project, an international network of after-school learning centers for youth from low-income communities. Resnick's group recently developed a new programming language, called Scratch, which makes it easier for kids to create their own interactive stories, games, and animations -- and share their creations on the web. Resnick earned a BS in physics from Princeton, and an MS and PhD in computer science from MIT. He worked for five years as a science and technology journalist for Business Week magazine, and he has consulted around the world on the uses of new technologies in education.
Paul Reynolds

University of Virginia


Paul Reynolds joined the University of Virginia Computer Science faculty in 1980. His research activities have been in simulation technology, parallel and distributed computing and computing technologies for the visually impaired. His current research includes uncertainty representation and propagation in simulations, and concurrency control in ordered networks, in particular Isotach Timing in multicore processors. He has supervised to completion over 60 graduate degrees. Over half of his Ph.D. students hold faculty positions in U.S. universities, or major US laboratories. His record for graduating women and minority graduate students ranks among the best in his department. He is a staff expert in modeling and simulation for the U.S. Army National Ground Intelligence Center in Charlottesville.
Debra Richardson

UC Irvine


Debra J. Richardson, professor of Informatics, is committed to raising ICS' rankings and building an infrastructure to support a dynamic academic and research school that meets the demands of the local community and industry and contributes to the global economy. She has dedicated enormous time to ensuring that UCI’s computer science program is top-tier, encompassing a broad and interdisciplinary curriculum, while attracting the best and brightest students and faculty. Committed to increasing the participation of women and other underrepresented groups in computing and information technology, Richardson serves as director of the Ada Byron Research Center for Diversity in Computing and Information Technology whose mission is to study and promote diverse perspectives in computer science, engineering, digital media and related information technology fields through a variety of research, mentoring and outreach activities.
Tajana Simunic Rosing

UCSD


Tajana Šimunic Rosing is currently an Assistant Professor in the Computer Science Department at UC San Diego. Her research interests are energy efficient computing, embedded and wireless systems. Prior to this she was a full time researcher at HP Labs while working part-time at Stanford University. She finished her PhD in 2001 at Stanford University, concurrently with finishing her Masters in Engineering Management. Her PhD topic was Dynamic Management of Power Consumption. Prior to pursuing the PhD, she worked as a Senior Design Engineer at Altera Corporation. She obtained the MS in EE from University of Arizona. She is currently an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing.
Mehran Sahami

Stanford


Mehran Sahami is an Associate Professor, Associate Chair for Education, and a Robert N. Noyce Faculty Fellow in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University. His research interests include machine learning, web search, and computer science education. Previously, Mehran was a Senior Research Scientist at Google Inc., and continues to maintain a consulting appointment there. He has published over three dozen technical papers, has more than 20 patent filings, and has helped organize numerous technical conferences and symposia. He received his BS, MS, and Ph.D. all in Computer Science from Stanford University.
Sharon Schweikhart

Ohio State University


Sharon Schweikhart is Associate Professor in the Division of Health services Management and Policy of The Ohio State University's College of Public Health. She also direct's the Master of Health Administration (MHA)graduate program. Dr. Schweikhart's research focuses on quality improvement, process redesign and information technology implementation in health care delivery. Her current research involves remote monitoring for patients with chronic illness, use of PHRs to facilitate communication and collobation between EMTs and Emergency Departments, and the PHR-mediated changes in physician-patient communication and trust.
Srinivasan Seshan

CMU


Srinivasan Seshan is currently an Associate Professor and held the Finmeccanica chair at Carnegie Mellon University's Computer Science Department from 2004 to 2006. Dr. Seshan received his Ph.D. in 1995 from the Computer Science Department at University of California, Berkeley. From 1995 to 2000, Dr. Seshan was a research staff member at IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center. Dr. Seshan's primary interests are in the broad areas of network protocols and distributed network applications. In the past, he has worked on topics such as transport/routing protocols for wireless networks, fast protocol stack implementations, RAID system design, performance prediction for Internet transfers, ISP multihoming, new approaches to congestion control, large-scale multiplayer games, and large-scale sensor networks. His current work explores the challenges and opportunities created by chaotic wireless network deployments. His web page is at http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~srini.
Marc Snir

UIUC


Professor Marc Snir is Michael Faiman and Saburo Muroga Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and has a courtesy appointment in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science. He currently pursues research in parallel computing. He is PI for the software of the petascale Blue Waters system and co-director of the Intel and Microsoft funded Universal Parallel Computing Research Center (UPCRC). From 2007 to 2008 he was director of the Illinois Informatics Institute. He was head of the Computer Science Department from 2001 to 2007. Until 2001 he was a senior manager at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center where he led the Scalable Parallel Systems research group that was responsible for major contributions to the IBM SP scalable parallel system and to the IBM Blue Gene system. Marc Snir received a Ph.D. in Mathematics from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 1979, worked at NYU on the NYU Ultracomputer project in 1980-1982, and worked at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 1982-1986, before joining IBM. Marc Snir was a major contributor to the design of the Message Passing Interface. He has published numerous papers and given many presentations on computational complexity, parallel algorithms, parallel architectures, interconnection networks, parallel languages and libraries and parallel programming environments. Marc is AAAS Fellow, ACM Fellow, and IEEE Fellow. He is on the Computer Research Association Board of Directors and is on the NSF CISE advisory committee. He has Erdos number 2 and is a mathematical descendent of Jacques Hadamard.
Bozidar Stojadinovic

University of Cal - Berkeley


Bozidar Stojadinovic is a Professor with the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California Berkeley. His degrees are in Civil Engineering: PhD from the University of California, Berkeley in 1995, MS from Carnegie-Mellon University in 1990 and BS from the University of Belgrade, Serbia in 1988. His primary research interest is in probabilistic performance-based seismic design of civil structures. In the area of application of information technologies in structural engineering, he is developing new experimental methods and, in particular, the hybrid simulation method for evaluation of civil structures using hybrid models that combine physical and numerical substructures. He is the Principal Investigator of the nees@berkeley Equipment Site team and a leader in developing methods for geographically distributed hybrid simulation using NEES facilities and methods for evaluating the quality of hybrid simulations.
Erik Sudderth

Brown University


Erik Sudderth will join the faculty of the Brown University Department of Computer Science as an Assistant Professor in 2009. He received his Bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of California, San Diego, and his Master's and Ph.D. in EECS from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests include machine learning, computer vision, and statistical signal and image processing. He was awarded a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship (1999), an Intel Foundation Doctoral Fellowship (2004), and in 2008 was named one of "AI's 10 to Watch" by IEEE Intelligent Systems Magazine.
Steve Swanson

UCSD


Steven Swanson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of California, San Diego.   His research interests include applications and architectures for non-volatile, solid-state memories, data-centric computing, and unconventional processor architectures.  He received his PhD from the University of Washington in 2006.
Roberto Tamassia

Brown University


Roberto Tamassia is Professor and Chair of the Department of Computer Science at Brown University. His research interests include information security, applied cryptography, analysis, design, and implementation of algorithms, graph drawing and computational geometry. He has published six textbooks and more than 220 research articles and books in the above areas and has given more than 50 invited lectures worldwide. He is an IEEE Fellow and the recipient of a Technical Achievement Award from the IEEE Computer Society for pioneering the field of graph drawing. He is listed among the most highly cited computer science authors by Thomson Scientific, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI). He serves regularly on program committees of international conferences. His research has been funded by ARO, DARPA, NATO, NSF, and several industrial sponsors. He received the Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1988.
Frank Vahid

UC Riverside


Frank Vahid is a Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of California, Riverside; Chair of the Faculty of Engineering at UCR; and Associate Director of the Center for Embedded Computer Systems at UC Irvine. He received a B.S. in Computer Engineering from the University of Illinois in 1988 graduating with highest honors, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Irvine in 1990 and 1994, respectively, where he was an SRC Fellow. Since 1990, he has co-authored over 120 conference and journal papers, including the best paper award from IEEE Transactions on VLSI in 2000, a DATE conference best paper award, and a DAC conference best paper nomination. He is co-author of the textbooks Digital Design, HDL for Digital Design,Verilog for Digital Design, and Embedded System Design. He received the Outstanding Teacher of the UCR College of Engineering award in 1997 and the College's Teaching Excellence Award in 2003.  His research emphasizes highly novel self-adapting compute architectures, and creating a generation of electronic sensor blocks that non-experts and experts alike can easily compose to build basic useful sensor-based systems. His teaching emphasis includes seeking to motivate students to build innovative new systems that improve the human condition.
Vijay Vazirani

Georgia Tech


Vijay Vazirani got his Bachelor's degree from MIT in 1979, his Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley in 1983, and is Professor of Computer Science at Georgia Tech. His research career has been centered around the design of algorithms, together with work on complexity theory, cryptography, coding theory, and game theory. During the 80's, he made seminal contributions to the classical maximum matching problem. During the 90's he focused on approximation algorithms, championing the primal-dual schema, which he applied to problems arising in network design, facility location and web caching, and clustering. Since 2001, he has been working in the area of algorithmic game theory, with a particular emphasis on algorithms for markets and bargaining. In 2001 he published a book on approximation algorithms (Springer-Verlag, Berlin). The book has been translated into Japanese, French and Polish.
Michael Wellman

University of Michigan


Michael P. Wellman is Professor and Associate Chair of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan. He received a PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1988 for his work in qualitative probabilistic reasoning and decision-theoretic planning. From 1988 to 1992, Wellman conducted research in these areas at the USAF's Wright Laboratory. For the past 17 years, his research has focused on computational market mechanisms for distributed decision making and electronic commerce. As Chief Market Technologist for TradingDynamics, Inc. (now part of Ariba), he designed configurable auction technology for dynamic business-to-business commerce. Wellman previously served as Chair of the ACM Special Interest Group on Electronic Commerce (SIGecom), and as Executive Editor of the Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research. He is a Fellow of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence and the Association for Computing Machinery.
Thomas Wenisch

University of Michigan


Thomas Wenisch is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan, specializing in computer architecture. Tom's prior research includes memory streaming for commercial server applications, store-wait-free multiprocessor memory systems and rigorous sampling-based performance evaluation methodologies. He is a principle developer of the Flexus full-system cycle-accurate simulation infrastructure. His ongoing work focuses on data center architecture, energy-efficient server design, and multi-core / multiprocessor memory systems. Prior to his academic career, Tom was a software developer at American Power Conversion, where he worked on data center thermal topology estimation. He is co-inventor on three patents. Tom received his Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University.
Adam Wierman

Caltech


Adam Wierman is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the California Institute of Technology, where he is a member of the Lee Center for Advanced Networking, the Center for the Mathematics of Information, and the Social and Information Sciences Laboratory. He received his doctorate in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University under the supervision of Mor Harchol-Balter where his thesis received the Distinguished Dissertation Award. He also briefly served as a visiting researcher at the EURANDOM institute under the supervision of Onno Boxma and Ivo Adan.  He is a recipient of an Okawa Foundation Research Award, an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, a Siebel Scholars Award, and multiple teaching awards. Wierman's research interests are best summarized as "Better design through modeling and measurement."  His work applies and often extends techniques in stochastic modeling, queueing theory, scheduling theory, and game theory in order to provide insight into the impact of design decisions in systems such as server farms, routers, wireless networks, and beyond.
Andrew Williams

Spelman College


Andrew B. Williams, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in Computer and Information Sciences at Spelman College in Atlanta, GA. He is the Principal Investigator and Director of the ARTSI Alliance, Advancing Robotics Technology for Societal Impact, www.artsialliance.org and Co-PI for ASPIRE: Advancing Spelman's Participation in Informatics Research and Education. He is the author of the recently published book, "Out of the Box: Building Robots, Transforming Lives". His website is http://www.spelman.edu/~williams
Stephen Wong

Rice University


Born and raised in Oberlin, OH (father was Math professor at Oberlin College). Undergraduate at Swarthmore College with BA with Honors in Physics with Physical Chemistry and Digital Electronics Minors. Spent a year working at Bell Labs Murry Hill with our now Energy Secretary, Steven Chu. Ph.D. in Physics from MIT in semi-magnetic semiconductor materials. Howard Hughes Fellow while at MIT. Off to Hughes Reseach Labs in sunny Malibu CA as a member of technical staff. Worked on high temperature superconductors and engineered bandgap materials. After the defense industry downturn in the early 90's, started teaching at California Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks CA. Taught physics, math and a little computer science. At that time, also did consulting work for Kodak, building applications for chemical kinetics analysis and modeling. Moved back to Oberlin College, where I first taught physcs and then switched to computer science. Developed an objects-first OOP and OOD-based introductory curriculumm there. Moved to Rice University in 2001 where I teach both OOP/D and software engineering. Developed an innovative pure-discovery process software engineering course that has no lectures or traditional homework assignments where the entire class works as a self-driven team to learn software engineering as they design and implement a state-of-the-art enterprise-class application.
Dianna Xu

Bryn Mawr College


Dianna Xu is Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Bryn Mawr College, a small liberal arts college of all women in the suburbs of Philadelphia. Her research interests include: Curves and Surfaces Fitting, Subdivision Surfaces, Mesh Generation and Optimization, Geometric Methods and Computer Aided Geometric Design in general. She also works on Computational Geometry, Affine and Euclidean Geometry and Algebraic Topology. In addition, she has devoted considerable time and effort rethinking the Computer Science curriculum to attract and retain women and minorities in the field.
Junfeng Yang

Columbia University


Junfeng Yang is an assistant professor in Computer Science department at Columbia University. Before that, he was a Post-doc researcher at Microsoft Research Silicon Valley. Junfeng Yang received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford University in 2008, his MS in Computer Science from Stanford in 2002, and his BS in Computer Science from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China in 2000. He is a receipt of the Best Paper Award of OSDI 2004.
Y. Richard Yang

Yale University


Dr. Y. Richard Yang is an Associate Professor of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at Yale University. His research interests include computer networks, mobile computing, wireless networking, sensor networks, and network security. He leads the Laboratory of Networked Systems (LANS) at Yale. He has served as a committee member of many conferences, as a panelist of several funding agencies, as an advisor of several industrial and academic organizations, and is the conference co-chaira of IWQoS 2006 and NetEcon'08. His recent awards include a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation and a Schlumberger Foundation Award. Dr. Yang's research is supported by both government funding agencies such as NSF and industrial companies such as Microsoft. He received his B.E. degree in computer science and technology from Tsinghua University (1993), and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science from the University of Texas at Austin (1998 and 2001).
Li Zhang

University of Wisconsin


Li Zhang is an Assistant Professor in the Computer Sciences Department at the University of Wisconsin. He received his B.E. in Automation (with a minor in Radio Technology and Information System) at Tsinghua University, P. R. China, and his PhD in Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington. Following his doctoral work, he spent two years as a postdoctoral research scientist at Columbia University. He joined the faculty at the University of Wisconsin in July 2007. He has received a NSF CAREER Award.
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