72MM IR FILTER. IR FILTER

72mm Ir Filter. Canister Filters Aquariums. 20 Inch Water Filter Cartridge

72mm Ir Filter


72mm ir filter
    ir filter
  • Infrared cut-off filters, sometimes called IR filters or heat-absorbing filters, are designed to reflect or block mid-infrared wavelengths while passing visible light.
72mm ir filter - Opteka HD²
Opteka HD² 72mm R72 720nm Infrared X-Ray IR Filter
Opteka HD² 72mm R72 720nm Infrared X-Ray IR Filter
Opteka specializes in manufacturing special optical devices for the past several years, would like to take this opportunity to introduce a newly developed product called the "HD? Infrared X-Ray Effect See-Through Multi-Coated Filter". This filter makes it possible for you to see images that are normally invisible to the human eye. It sounds like science-fiction but it isn't; this fantastic new product has been developed using the most highly advanced optical technologies available. This filter will filter out 99% of light seen by the naked eye only allowing infrared light through so that technically the naked eye can see 100% black when the filter is in place. Multi-coating prevents light reflection, ghost light...etc, making images clearer and sharper. On your digital camcorder, turn the "Nightshot" function on - the naked eye cannot pick up the high contrast black, so with the infrared filter and Nightshot combination, for example, it will help you see in the images provided, that we 'accidentally' spilt some permanent ink on this document and the text is now impossible to read. However, when we attached the filter to our Sony 'TR250PK' camcorder, the writing is clearly legible through the ink - thus the x-ray effect! You will be amazed with the power if you take the time to experiment and experience its capabilities for yourself. If you already have a digital camcorder with the Nightshot feature and are interested in experimenting with the X-Ray effect, this is by far the least expensive method, giving you the results you are looking for. Just screw on the filter, switch on the 'Night' feature, and you are ready to go!

85% (19)
My first successful IR shot
My first successful IR shot
Using Nikon Capture NX and Hoya R72 IR filter: Shooting with an IR filter can be tricky sometimes. For starters, you can't see anything through the viewfinder; the filter is nearly opaque! Secondly, getting the white balance right can be a bit tricky at first. And, to make things interesting, the shutter has to be slowed right down. Immediately after getting my filter in the mail, I ran across the street and started shooting! 10 minutes and 20 frames later I managed to get this shot. I've been hooked since... For those who are interested in how this is done: I use the Hoya R72 IR filter on a Nikon D70s. I do not have the D70s modified in any way. I've heard you can get better results with a camera that has its built in IR filter removed but I wouldn't bother, at least not in the case with a D70/D70s. I set my white balance to the foliage in the scene. Grass and leaves really reflect IR light quite nicely and it gives you that slick "winter" effect. From my experimentations, setting the white balance in-camera isn't really required. You can set the WB later in Capture NX or Photoshop etc. The main advantage of setting it in camera is that you can immediately see the results in the LCD. Either way, shoot in RAW and you'll be fine (more on that later). The filter is opaque so I will typically frame the shot with the filter off. Then, in manual mode, I will slow the shutter speed, open the aperture and place the filter for the shot. Your light meter won't help here! That means it will usually take me 3-4 shots to get the exposure right. You may want to bracket your shots to save time. Once you have the exposure you're after it's time to process it. Assuming you shot RAW (who shoots in JPEG anyway?!) open up your photo in your favourite editor. You might notice that the colours will be completely different from what you previewed on your LCD. In the case for Nikon cameras, Photoshop and other software seem to have a tough time reading preset WB (all WB in general too). If there's a solution to this, well I'm not aware of it. This is partially the reason I use Capture NX (that, and now that I've warmed up to it I think it's amazing). Nikon software works beautifully with Nikon cameras, no surprises there. In Capture NX: Set your white control point to one of the brightest spots on a leaf or grass. To do this in the menu: Control Point-> White Control Point or hit F4 for the icons. You may also want to set a black control point to enhance contrast. Now for the sky, I've found the easiest (and really effective) way of getting nicely coloured skies is to set the hue. In the menu: Adjust -> Colour -> LCH. In the drop down go to Hue, now go to 180 degrees to give you more control over the colours. Altering the Hue will have a greater impact on the sky than the rest of the image since you've already set your white and control points to the foliage. As for Photoshop, I plan on learning how to do all of this soon. Once I've figured it out I'll post my findings here. I hope this helped. Have fun with IR! And please, don't hesitate to drop me a line or two about this. I'd like to hear of any suggestions you may have. I'm still just learning how to do all of this. FYI: Hoya R72 filters can be pricey in stores. The 72mm I have goes for $240 CDN, which is ridiculous. I was able to find it brand new on eBay for $70 from Honk Kong.
Return of the infra-red shots :-)
Return of the infra-red shots :-)
A bridge over the river at Ferry Meadows, on the outskirts of peterborough. Taken in infra-red, then the blue and the red channels swapped in channel mixer. This is my first "half-decent" infra-red shot with my Canon 20D (all the other infra-red shots before this have been with my Canon ixus compact camera). The reason it's taken so long to take one, given i've had the 20D quite a number of months now, is i originally bought an IR filter off ebay that was slide-based for mounting in a cokin-P type filter holder. I had my reservations, but the seller claimed it worked fine, so i bought it. And it did work... in a fashion - i had real problems stopping light leakage due to the long exposure needed - and that light leakage results of lots of flare and a reflection of the lens :-( Also, i was finding i needed over 2 minutes @ f4 to get an exposure! The results were very poor indeed :-( And then the other week i found a really cool photo someone took with a 20D, and a 30sec exposure @ f5.4, which made me realise that my IR filter was useless, so i've invested in a new filter (a screw-on one, so light leakage isn't a problem :-) The one downside is.... i accidentally bought the wrong size, i've got a 72mm one when my wide-angle lens needs 77mm. There were a few swear-words when i realised that... so if anyone wants to buy a 72mm infra-red filter, let me know :-)

72mm ir filter
72mm ir filter
Opteka HD² 67mm R72 720nm Infrared X-Ray IR Filter
Opteka specializes in manufacturing special optical devices for the past several years, would like to take this opportunity to introduce a newly developed product called the "HD? Infrared X-Ray Effect See-Through Multi-Coated Filter". This filter makes it possible for you to see images that are normally invisible to the human eye. It sounds like science-fiction but it isn't; this fantastic new product has been developed using the most highly advanced optical technologies available. This filter will filter out 99% of light seen by the naked eye only allowing infrared light through so that technically the naked eye can see 100% black when the filter is in place. Multi-coating prevents light reflection, ghost light...etc, making images clearer and sharper. On your digital camcorder, turn the "Nightshot" function on - the naked eye cannot pick up the high contrast black, so with the infrared filter and Nightshot combination, for example, it will help you see in the images provided, that we 'accidentally' spilt some permanent ink on this document and the text is now impossible to read. However, when we attached the filter to our Sony 'TR250PK' camcorder, the writing is clearly legible through the ink - thus the x-ray effect! You will be amazed with the power if you take the time to experiment and experience its capabilities for yourself. If you already have a digital camcorder with the Nightshot feature and are interested in experimenting with the X-Ray effect, this is by far the least expensive method, giving you the results you are looking for. Just screw on the filter, switch on the 'Night' feature, and you are ready to go!

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