GARDEN EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE : EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE

GARDEN EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE : MOUNTAIN EQUIPMENT CHAMONIX SWEATER : USED FOOD PACKAGING EQUIPMENT.

Garden Equipment Maintenance


garden equipment maintenance
    maintenance
  • The process of maintaining or preserving someone or something, or the state of being maintained
  • means of maintenance of a family or group
  • alimony: court-ordered support paid by one spouse to another after they are separated
  • The provision of financial support for a person's living expenses, or the support so provided
  • The process of keeping something in good condition
  • care: activity involved in maintaining something in good working order; "he wrote the manual on car care"
    equipment
  • Mental resources
  • The act of equipping, or the state of being equipped, as for a voyage or expedition; Whatever is used in equipping; necessaries for an expedition or voyage; the collective designation for the articles comprising an outfit; equipage; as, a railroad equipment (locomotives, cars, etc.
  • A tool is a device that can be used to produce or achieve something, but that is not consumed in the process. Colloquially a tool can also be a procedure or process used for a specific purpose.
  • The process of supplying someone or something with such necessary items
  • an instrumentality needed for an undertaking or to perform a service
  • The necessary items for a particular purpose
    garden
  • Ornamental grounds laid out for public enjoyment and recreation
  • A large public hall
  • work in the garden; "My hobby is gardening"
  • the flowers or vegetables or fruits or herbs that are cultivated in a garden
  • A piece of ground, often near a house, used for growing flowers, fruit, or vegetables
  • a plot of ground where plants are cultivated
garden equipment maintenance - The 2011-2016
The 2011-2016 Outlook for Repair and Maintenance of Home and Garden Equipment and Appliances in Greater China
The 2011-2016 Outlook for Repair and Maintenance of Home and Garden Equipment and Appliances in Greater China
This econometric study covers the latent demand outlook for repair and maintenance of home and garden equipment and appliances across the regions of Greater China, including provinces, autonomous regions (Guangxi, Nei Mongol, Ningxia, Xinjiang, Xizang - Tibet), municipalities (Beijing, Chongqing, Shanghai, and Tianjin), special administrative regions (Hong Kong and Macau), and Taiwan (all hereafter referred to as "regions"). Latent demand (in millions of U.S. dollars), or potential industry earnings (P.I.E.) estimates are given across some 1,100 cities in Greater China. For each major city in question, the percent share the city is of the region and of Greater China is reported. Each major city is defined as an area of "economic population", as opposed to the demographic population within a legal geographic boundary. For many cities, the economic population is much larger that the population within the city limits; this is especially true for the cities of the Western regions. For the coastal regions, cities which are close to other major cities or which represent, by themselves, a high percent of the regional population, actual city-level population is closer to the economic population (e.g. in Beijing). Based on this "economic" definition of population, comparative benchmarks allow the reader to quickly gauge a city's marketing and distribution value vis-a-vis others. This report does not discuss the specific players in the market serving the latent demand, nor specific details at the product level. The study also does not consider short-term cyclicalities that might affect realized sales. The study, therefore, is strategic in nature, taking an aggregate and long-run view, irrespective of the players or products involved.

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NYC - Brooklyn - Carroll Gardens - Firefighter Louis Valentino Jr Ballfield at Carroll Park
NYC - Brooklyn - Carroll Gardens - Firefighter Louis Valentino Jr Ballfield at Carroll Park
This ballfield was named in honor of firefighter and lifeguard Louis Valentino Jr. (1958-1996) under a local law introduced by Councilmember Stephen DiBrienza and signed by Mayor Giuliani on June 25, 1996. Beginning with his early years in Red Hook and Carroll Gardens--where he attended Sacred Heart St. Stephens--Valentino lived and studied in a number of Brooklyn neighborhoods. A graduate of Xaverian High School in Bay Ridge and St. Francis College in Brooklyn Heights, he was living in Bensonhurst at the time of his death. Valentino fulfilled his lifelong aspiration to become a firefighter when he joined the Fire Department in 1984. He was assigned to Engine Company 281 where he battled fires for two years. He was twice cited for his bravery, in 1987 and again in 1990, and served with Ladder Company 147 in Flatbush. Valentino was accepted to the elite Rescue Company 2 in Crown Heights in 1993, joining the ranks of the city’s most experienced and versatile firefighters. On February 5, 1996 Valentino was killed while searching for wounded firefighters in a three alarm blaze in an illegal Flatlands garage. A Brooklyn mechanic who caused the fire was convicted of murdering Valentino on December 2, 1996. The Louis Valentino Jr. Ballfield preserves the memory of a man who not only demonstrated selfless devotion to fighting fires and saving lives but was also renowned for his prowess as a member of the Fire Department softball team. Brooklyn’s third oldest park is named for Charles Carroll (1737-1832), an American Revolutionary leader and signer of the Declaration of Independence, for whom Carroll Street is also named. He served in the Continental Congress from 1776-78, represented Maryland in the Senate from 1789-92 and also led a Maryland regiment that defended the Old Stone House in Park Slope. The park originated in the late 1840s as a private community garden shortly after much of the neighborhood, which now comprises the Carroll Gardens Historical District, was laid out by surveyor Richard Butts. The land was acquired for use as a public park by the City of Brooklyn in 1853. It was first improved around 1870 when a drainage system was installed, a children’s playground was built, and new walks were laid. Subsequent renovations in the 1890s, 1930s, and 1960s introduced new design features and playgrounds, which increased opportunities for active recreation. In 1994 Carroll Park underwent a $1.3 million capital reconstruction and redesign, funded by Borough President Golden. Improvements included new plantings, reorganization of the playspaces and the installation of play equipment. The historic character of the park was also restored with decorative cast iron gates and fencing that echo the fences of neighborhood brownstones and motifs on the bronze and granite Soldier and Sailors World War I Monument (1920) by sculptor Eugene H. Morahan that was conserved under the same project. Community involvement in the programming, maintenance, and preservation of the park has been ensured by the Committee to Improve Carroll Park (first formed in 1975), in partnership with City of New York/Parks & Recreation.
NYC - Brooklyn - Carroll Gardens - Carroll Park - Robert Acito Parkhouse
NYC - Brooklyn - Carroll Gardens - Carroll Park - Robert Acito Parkhouse
This brick parkhouse is named for Robert Scott Acito, who served as District Manager of Community Board Six from 1980 through 1993. He was born on May 14, 1948 and grew up in the Gravesend section of Brooklyn. A graduate of Polytechnic Preparatory Country Day School in Brooklyn, Acito received his baccalaureate degree in psychology from Long Island University in 1970. Acito came to Community Board Six, an area with more than 100,000 residents that includes the neighborhoods of Carroll Gardens, Cobble Hill, Gowanus, Park Slope, and Red Hook, in 1978 as Assistant District Manager. In the summer of 1979, Acito served as Project Director for the district’s Summer Youth Program. He became District Manager in 1980, and was widely praised for his work for the betterment of the community. Acito’s efforts as an advocate for the needs of the district led to the founding of many of the district’s current day programs and services, including the establishment of the Park Slope Family Neighborhood Center, a multi-service community resource center located on 14th Street. Acito died on January 25, 1993. His determination, dedication, and professionalism are still evident throughout the Community Board district in the many lives that were touched by his work. Brooklyn’s third oldest park is named for Charles Carroll (1737-1832), an American Revolutionary leader from Maryland and signer of the Declaration of Independence, for whom Carroll Street is also named. He served in the Continental Congress from 1776-78, represented Maryland in the Senate from 1789-92 and also led a Maryland regiment that defended the Old Stone House in Park Slope. The park originated in the late 1840s as a private community garden shortly after much of the neighborhood, which now comprises the Carroll Gardens Historical District, was laid out by surveyor Richard Butts. The land was acquired for use as a public park by the City of Brooklyn in 1853. It was first improved around 1870 when a drainage system was installed, a children’s playground was built, and new walks were laid. Subsequent renovations in the 1890s, 1930s, and 1960s introduced new design features and playgrounds, which increased opportunities for active recreation. In 1994 Carroll Park underwent a $1.3 million capital reconstruction and redesign, funded by Borough President Golden. Improvements included new plantings, reorganization of the playspaces and the installation of play equipment. The historic character of the park was also restored with decorative cast iron gates and fencing that echo the fences of neighborhood brownstones and motifs on the bronze and granite Soldiers and Sailors World War I Monument (1920) by sculptor Eugene H. Morahan that was conserved under the same project. Community involvement in the programming, maintenance, and preservation of the park has been ensured by the Committee to Improve Carroll Park, first formed in 1975, in partnership with City of New York/Parks & Recreation.

garden equipment maintenance
garden equipment maintenance
The 2011 Report on Repair and Maintenance of Home and Garden Equipment and Appliances: World Market Segmentation by City
This report was created for global strategic planners who cannot be content with traditional methods of segmenting world markets. With the advent of a "borderless world", cities become a more important criteria in prioritizing markets, as opposed to regions, continents, or countries. This report covers the top 2000 cities in over 200 countries. It does so by reporting the estimated market size (in terms of latent demand) for each major city of the world. It then ranks these cities and reports them in terms of their size as a percent of the country where they are located, their geographic region (e.g. Africa, Asia, Europe, Middle East, North America, Latin America), and the total world market.

In performing various economic analyses for its clients, I have been occasionally asked to investigate the market potential for various products and services across cities. The purpose of the studies is to understand the density of demand within a country and the extent to which a city might be used as a point of distribution within its region. From an economic perspective, however, a city does not represent a population within rigid geographical boundaries. To an economist or strategic planner, a city represents an area of dominant influence over markets in adjacent areas. This influence varies from one industry to another, but also from one period of time to another.

In what follows, I summarize the economic potential for the world's major cities for "repair and maintenance of home and garden equipment and appliances" for the year 2011. The goal of this report is to report my findings on the real economic potential, or what an economist calls the latent demand, represented by a city when defined as an area of dominant influence. The reader needs to realize that latent demand may or may not represent real sales.

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