2000 TEST EQUIPMENT - TEST EQUIPMENT

2000 test equipment - Mountain equipment gilet - New holland equipment for sale.

2000 Test Equipment


2000 test equipment
    test equipment
  • equipment required to perform a test
    2000
  • 2000 is the second album by hip hop artist Grand Puba of the group Brand Nubian, released in mid-1995 through Elektra Records.
  • The 2000 is a breakdance move which resembles a rapidly-spinning handstand. It is a type of spin in practice, but many consider it a power move because it is so flashy and is often begun with significant momentum like other power moves.
  • 2000 (MM) was a leap year that started on a Saturday, in accordance with the Gregorian Calendar. It was the 2000th year of the Common Era or the Anno Domini designation, and the last year of the 20th century and of the 2nd millennium.

THINK! DRUG DRIVING COSTS LIVES
THINK! DRUG DRIVING COSTS LIVES
Attorney General's Department: NSW Government - AUSTRALIA Driving under the influence of cannabis: The problem and potential countermeasures This bulletin assessed (a) whether recent drug-drivers were more likely to self-report accidents than non-intoxicated drivers; (b) the likely deterrent effect of roadside drug testing (RDT), increasing the severity of sanctions for drug-driving and providing factual information about accident risk associated with drug-driving; and (c) what factors were predictive of driving under the influence of cannabis (DUIC). The results provided only limited support for a relationship between DUIC and accident risk. RDT appears to act as a more effective deterrent against drug-driving than either increasing the severity of sanctions or providing factual information about the risks associated with the behaviour. Males, dependent users, early onset cannabis users, frequent drivers, cannabis users who had used more classes of other drugs and cannabis users who believed that their risk of accident would not change following cannabis use were all more likely to report DUIC. BOCSAR report. Released 25 October 2005 Driving under the influence of cannabis in a New South Wales rural area A report released by the NSW Bureau of Crime and Statistics. This study examines the prevalence of driving under the influence of cannabis (DUIC), and DUIC and alcohol together, in an area of Australia with a high number of young cannabis users. Results of this study are discussed in terms of their implications for public health and education campaigns. May 2003 Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA) Drug drive testing introduced to NSW Outline of proposed 12 month trial in NSW Alcohol and other drugs Truck driver's & drugs - Brochure The RTA has produced a brochure warning heavy vehicle drivers of the dangers of using drugs. Drug and alcohol offences CommunityBuilders: Drugs and Community Action A brochure on Drugs & Driving that is available from the Community Builders website. It highlights the dangers of driving under the influence of drugs.(PDF) Australia Australian Drug Foundation in conjunction with Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre - Drugs and driving in Australia: a survey of community attitudes, experience and understanding - the findings of a comprehensive year-long study into the drug-driving habits of Australian motorists. The major component of the project was a confidential and anonymous online survey of 6801 Australian drivers about their attitudes toward, and experiences of, drugs and driving. ACT Government: Drug Driving and Road Crashes - an Overview Druginfo: Effects of cannabis, amphetamines and benzodiazepines on driving ability - from research Conducted by the Drugs and Driving Research Unit, Swinburn University of Technology plus sobriety testing procedures currently being used by Victoria Police Druginfo Clearinghouse: Drugs and Driving The Druginfo Clearinghouse have developed a website about drugs and driving. It includesinformation on the effects of various drugs, information on trials, factsheets, etc. Monash University Accident Research Centre: Cannabis and road rafety: A review of recent epidemiological, driver impairment, and drug screening literature This report reviews the key issues concerning cannabis and road safety, including: patterns of cannabis use; the prevalence of cannabis in the driver population, drivers suspected of driving under the influence, and drivers killed or injured; effects on simulator and on-road driving; detection of cannabis in bodily samples; and measurement of impairment using performance tests such as the Standardised Field Sobriety Test. The report highlights the current gaps in knowledge and documents the specific areas of research that need to be pursued in future studies in order to further enhance our understanding of how cannabis influences driving skills. December 2004 Queensland Government: Anti Drug Driving Information about drugs and driving, including enforcement in Queensland. Society for the Study of Addiction: Marijuana use and car crash injury Research report about the relationship between marijuana use and car crash injury by Stephanie Blows, et al. 2005 South Australia Road Traffic (Drug Driving) Amendment Bill 2005 Exposure Bill Proposed drug driving legislation - FAQs Victorian Government Arrive Alive: Random Roadside Saliva Testing Arrive Alive: Drugs and Driving VicRoads: Drugs & Driving: Factsheet Western Australian Government The Drug Aware Youth Drug Driving Education Project Drugs and Driving Don't Mix Information about how and why different drugs can affect your driving. Back to top International Belgium Illegal Drugs and Driving A paper submitted to ICADTS. This report summarizes global activities on the subject of illegal drugs and driving. It discusses the current status of political, legislative and law enforcement issues in Belgium, Fr
IMG 2325
IMG 2325
The cap that covered the scope was just from a coffee can. It had some foam inside it to make the fit tight, that foam decayed and is gone, New foam could be installed easily to get a nice tight fit again. The cover would still work fine. The idea was just to have a cover on it so dust won't fall on the mirror or some other undesirable object. All older scopes should be checked if they have old epoxy on the secondary holding it to the mount. It's probably a safe bet to take it out and inspect it every few years as they get older if you have the knowledge and determination. I'd say storing a scope aimed upward would be a mistake based on my experience of having a secondary crash into my primary when the mirror came "unglued". You are probably better off storing it at some angle or on it's side. The mirror surface on this mirror is still in pretty good shape and it was surfaced in 1975. Compare that to the Robinson Observatory F12 resurfaced in 1975 but stored outdoors in the observatory. Looks like the mirror surface finish held up better on the telescope stored indoors. For those of you new to astronomy, a telescope mirror is not like a mirror at your house. The coating is not behind the glass on a telescope mirror, but on the surface of the curved glass. This is created by coating the mirror with Aluminum which is performed by a company that has coating equipment. What happens is a blank is placed in a vacum chamber. A filiment of aluminum hangs above the mirror. A vacuum pump evaquates the air in the chamber and then a high voltage current vaporizes the aluminum and if flys through the chamber and puts a very thin even coating on the top surface of the mirror. The mirror then has a coating of reflective material on the top of it. This is not underneath a layer of glass. The glass of the mirror was polished to a very high quality level (hopefully) and is hopefullly very optically accurate. Testing of the mirror surface before the coating happens is peformed by the person or group who created the mirror. In some facilities (Celestron) they have automatic testing equipment that uses laser imaging to test the mirrors before they are finished. In the old days they used to advertize they could send you a copy of the photo of the test image for your mirror, for a small additional fee. The mirror surface of course can have dust gather on it and over time may decay in it's performance ability. The finish of the mirror surface is very important as well. If I can recall correctly longer focal length telescopes don't need to be as accurate as short focal length telescopes. An F10 or F12 doesn't need to be as accurate as an F4 or F5. I think I've read a long time ago an F12 or greater might not even need parabalic correction due to the long throw of the image. There might be some parabalic correction for the longer focal length mirrors, but it's often not needed. For the beginners out there an F rating for a telescope is the distance of the focus of the mirror, compared to the radius of the mirror itself. If the mirror is 12 inches with a 12 inch radius, then an F4 focal length would be 4 times that radius or 24 inches. And F8 would be 8 times the radius or 48 inches and so forth. The objective lens has to intercept the focused rays at that distance. The distance of throw for focusing an objective is the objective focal length. If an objective has a focal length of 1 inch and the mirror has a throw of 48 inches we divide the mirrors throw by the throw of the eyepiece and come up with 48/1 or 48 power. If the eyepiece has a 1/2 inch focal length, it would be 96 power for a 48 inch throw on the main mirror and so forth. To make things more complicated we actually talk about the focal length in milimeters for both the main mirror or lens (for refractors) and the eyepiece. The eyepieces can have very short throws and its easier to do the math of course if your using milimeters. So a 6 mm lens on a 3000 mm throw from a main lens or mirror would give 500 power. High power of course sounds great, but it's really a drawback to most viewing and it's difficult to keep most small scopes aligned with images with higher powered viewing. Additionally the average backyard astronomer doesn't have the tripod, equipment or even knowledge and location to take full advantage of a very high powered eyepiece. One of the favorite questions I used to get from occassional visitors or people I'd meet was "is that telescope powerful enough to see the lunar landing site?" Even if we had a scope with enough power, the speed differentials would mean the site would likely fly by so fast you'd never recognize it in the blur. Parabolic correction and wave accuracy are more important for rich field telescopes compared to long throw high powered telescopes. A 1/10th wave accuracy might be perfectly fine for a long throw high powered telescope, but an F5 or F4 scope needs 1/16th or

2000 test equipment
See also: