DOOR DECORATION IDEAS FOR TEACHERS. DOOR DECORATION IDEAS

Door decoration ideas for teachers. Celtic decorating. Room decorator software

Door Decoration Ideas For Teachers


door decoration ideas for teachers
    for teachers
  • Find pre-trip and post-trip environmental education lesson plans, packing lists, forms, and more.
    decoration
  • The process or art of decorating or adorning something
  • the act of decorating something (in the hope of making it more attractive)
  • an award for winning a championship or commemorating some other event
  • Ornamentation
  • A thing that serves as an ornament
  • something used to beautify
    ideas
  • A concept or mental impression
  • A thought or suggestion as to a possible course of action
  • (idea) the content of cognition; the main thing you are thinking about; "it was not a good idea"; "the thought never entered my mind"
  • An opinion or belief
  • (idea) mind: your intention; what you intend to do; "he had in mind to see his old teacher"; "the idea of the game is to capture all the pieces"
  • (idea) a personal view; "he has an idea that we don't like him"
    door
  • Used to refer to the distance from one building in a row to another
  • A doorway
  • doorway: the entrance (the space in a wall) through which you enter or leave a room or building; the space that a door can close; "he stuck his head in the doorway"
  • anything providing a means of access (or escape); "we closed the door to Haitian immigrants"; "education is the door to success"
  • A hinged, sliding, or revolving barrier at the entrance to a building, room, or vehicle, or in the framework of a cupboard
  • a swinging or sliding barrier that will close the entrance to a room or building or vehicle; "he knocked on the door"; "he slammed the door as he left"
door decoration ideas for teachers - The Creative
The Creative Teacher: An Encyclopedia of Ideas to Energize Your Curriculum (McGraw-Hill Teacher Resources)
The Creative Teacher: An Encyclopedia of Ideas to Energize Your Curriculum (McGraw-Hill Teacher Resources)
A comprehensive, practical resource packed with proven techniques and seasoned advice for time-strapped educators
For teachers of grades K-6
Facing ever-more-demanding state standards and less disciplined students, even the most experienced teacher carries a heavier burden today than ever before. The Creative Teacher offers inventive tools to enhance standards-based curricula and helpful strategies for creating new and engaging lesson plans. Fillled with fresh ideas for everything from bulletin boards to math activities, this one-stop resource will quickly become the most valuable volume in your library.

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West Street Building
West Street Building
Financial District, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States The West Street Building, one of three major Downtown office buildings designed by Cass Gilbert, was built in 1905-07 for the West Street Improvement Corporation, a partnership headed by Howard Carroll. Carroll was president of two asphalt companies and vice-president of his father-in-law's Star in Transportation Company, which had major river shipping interests. Although today separated from the Hudson River by the landfill supporting Battery Park City, the site of the West Street Building originally had a highly visible location facing the waterfront along West Street. Carroll conceived of his project as a first-class skyscraper office building for the shipping and railroad industries. In addition to Carroll's companies, the building soon filled up with tenants including major companies in the transportation industry. The building's top floor was occupied by "The Garret Restaurant," which advertised itself as the highest restaurant in New York and boasted of its panoramic river and city views. Cass Gilbert was one of the most prominent architects in New York in the first decade of the twentieth century. His succession of early skyscrapers helped pave the way for the great romantic skyscraper towers of the 1920s and beyond. His West Street Building may be considered transitional from the "base-shaft-capital" arrangement of the late-nineteenth-century office buildings conceived as analogous to a classical column - and perhaps best epitomized by his own design for the Broad way-Chambers Building - to the romantic tower exemplified by his design for the Woolworth Building. While the West Street Building is tripartite in configuration, its upper floors are a romantic mansarded design. The building's Gothic vocabulary is an early instance of its use in American skyscraper design, anticipating the Woolworth Building. The clustered piers in the tower's middle section anticipate the verticality stressed in later skyscraper design. The West Street Building was one of many office buildings erected in lower Manhattan during the first decade following the consolidation of the City of Greater New York, but its handsome design set it apart, and it won widespread critical acclaim. Today, its exterior survives largely intact, and the building remains in commercial office use. DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS Carroll's dock-side skyscraper for the shipping trade The West Street Building was conceived and built by the West Street Improvement Company, a syndicate of downtown business interests headed by Howard Carroll that included John Peirce, who served as the building's general contractor. The company initially maintained its offices in the Broadway-Chambers Building, also designed by Cass Gilbert. Born in Albany. New York, and educated in New York and abroad, Howard Carroll (1854-1916) worked as a journalist at the New York Times. He later joined the Starin Transportation Company, a large firm with river transportation interests, owned by his father-in-law, John Henry Starin (1825-1909). By 1905, when Carroll formed the West Street Improvement Company, he had become the Starin Company's vice-president. He also had separate business interests unconnected to Starin, as president of both the Sicilian Asphalt Paving Company and the Asphalt Company of Canada. Carroll's West Street Improvement Company conceived the West Street Building as a high-class office building specifically targeting the shipping industry. Though the site today is several blocks inland from the waterfront, West Street in 1905 ran along the shore of the Hudson River, and the new building rose directly across the street from the docks. At the time West Street was lined with ferries and warehouses of the railroad and steamship companies.4 In the words of a rental brochure for the West Street Building, it "commends itself particularly to railroads, engineers, dock builders, contractors, lawyers, shippers, and machinery and electrical trades." Carroll commissioned a design for the West Street Building in April 1905 from architect Cass Gilbert. Cass Gilbert (1859-1934) Cass Gilbert's commissions include several of New York City's major landmarks; the two most important of these, the U.S. Custom House and the Wool worth Building, are of national significance. Gilbert was a Midwesterner who trained and later practiced in the East. His career falls roughly into two parts: a local practice in St. Paul, Minnesota, in the 1880s and 1890s, and a national practice, based in New York, from 1900 until his death in 1934. Gilbert was born the son of an engineer in Zanesville, Ohio, a town laid out in part by his grandfather. While still a child, he and his family moved to St. Paul, where he completed his secondary education. In 1876 he entered the office of A.M. Radcliffe, a local architect. Two years later he went east to study at the architecture scho
West Street Building
West Street Building
Financial District, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States The West Street Building, one of three major Downtown office buildings designed by Cass Gilbert, was built in 1905-07 for the West Street Improvement Corporation, a partnership headed by Howard Carroll. Carroll was president of two asphalt companies and vice-president of his father-in-law's Star in Transportation Company, which had major river shipping interests. Although today separated from the Hudson River by the landfill supporting Battery Park City, the site of the West Street Building originally had a highly visible location facing the waterfront along West Street. Carroll conceived of his project as a first-class skyscraper office building for the shipping and railroad industries. In addition to Carroll's companies, the building soon filled up with tenants including major companies in the transportation industry. The building's top floor was occupied by "The Garret Restaurant," which advertised itself as the highest restaurant in New York and boasted of its panoramic river and city views. Cass Gilbert was one of the most prominent architects in New York in the first decade of the twentieth century. His succession of early skyscrapers helped pave the way for the great romantic skyscraper towers of the 1920s and beyond. His West Street Building may be considered transitional from the "base-shaft-capital" arrangement of the late-nineteenth-century office buildings conceived as analogous to a classical column - and perhaps best epitomized by his own design for the Broad way-Chambers Building - to the romantic tower exemplified by his design for the Woolworth Building. While the West Street Building is tripartite in configuration, its upper floors are a romantic mansarded design. The building's Gothic vocabulary is an early instance of its use in American skyscraper design, anticipating the Woolworth Building. The clustered piers in the tower's middle section anticipate the verticality stressed in later skyscraper design. The West Street Building was one of many office buildings erected in lower Manhattan during the first decade following the consolidation of the City of Greater New York, but its handsome design set it apart, and it won widespread critical acclaim. Today, its exterior survives largely intact, and the building remains in commercial office use. DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS Carroll's dock-side skyscraper for the shipping trade The West Street Building was conceived and built by the West Street Improvement Company, a syndicate of downtown business interests headed by Howard Carroll that included John Peirce, who served as the building's general contractor. The company initially maintained its offices in the Broadway-Chambers Building, also designed by Cass Gilbert. Born in Albany. New York, and educated in New York and abroad, Howard Carroll (1854-1916) worked as a journalist at the New York Times. He later joined the Starin Transportation Company, a large firm with river transportation interests, owned by his father-in-law, John Henry Starin (1825-1909). By 1905, when Carroll formed the West Street Improvement Company, he had become the Starin Company's vice-president. He also had separate business interests unconnected to Starin, as president of both the Sicilian Asphalt Paving Company and the Asphalt Company of Canada. Carroll's West Street Improvement Company conceived the West Street Building as a high-class office building specifically targeting the shipping industry. Though the site today is several blocks inland from the waterfront, West Street in 1905 ran along the shore of the Hudson River, and the new building rose directly across the street from the docks. At the time West Street was lined with ferries and warehouses of the railroad and steamship companies.4 In the words of a rental brochure for the West Street Building, it "commends itself particularly to railroads, engineers, dock builders, contractors, lawyers, shippers, and machinery and electrical trades." Carroll commissioned a design for the West Street Building in April 1905 from architect Cass Gilbert. Cass Gilbert (1859-1934) Cass Gilbert's commissions include several of New York City's major landmarks; the two most important of these, the U.S. Custom House and the Wool worth Building, are of national significance. Gilbert was a Midwesterner who trained and later practiced in the East. His career falls roughly into two parts: a local practice in St. Paul, Minnesota, in the 1880s and 1890s, and a national practice, based in New York, from 1900 until his death in 1934. Gilbert was born the son of an engineer in Zanesville, Ohio, a town laid out in part by his grandfather. While still a child, he and his family moved to St. Paul, where he completed his secondary education. In 1876 he entered the office of A.M. Radcliffe, a local architect. Two years later he went east to study at the architecture school of

door decoration ideas for teachers
door decoration ideas for teachers
Teacher Silver & Crystal Expressively Yours Bracelet
Enjoy the beauty of this silver-plated and crystal Expressively Yours bracelet. The Inspire, Wisdom and Teacher words are on both sides of the silver bead. It is finished off with a heart charm and a toggle clasp. Included with this bracelet is this inspirational saying: A teacher has unique qualities, The gift of wisdom to share, With patience and understanding, To inspire many with special care. It comes packaged in a beautiful gift box with a ribbon-ready to give as a gift. Ages 18+ 8" long

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