FRENCH STYLE INTERIOR DECORATING - INTERIOR DECORATING

French Style Interior Decorating - Tuscan Style Interior Decorating - Interior Decorating Window.

French Style Interior Decorating


french style interior decorating
    interior decorating
  • (interior decoration) decoration consisting of the layout and furnishings of a livable interior
  • Interior design is a multi-faceted profession in which creative and technical solutions are applied within a structure to achieve a built interior environment.
    french style
  • French Style is Dean Martin's first LP for Reprise Records. Recorded during February 1962, the album features French-themed popular songs and Chansons arranged by Neal Hefti.
  • A two-tone look where the nail bed and free edge are different colors; for a classic French style, the nail bed is a shade of pink, and the free edge a shade of white
french style interior decorating - Jacques Garcia:
Jacques Garcia: Decorating in the French Style
Jacques Garcia: Decorating in the French Style
A thirty-year career has made Jacques Garcia a worldwide name in interior design in the French tradition. In Paris, chic crowds flock to his celebrated Hetel Costes and Laduree tearoom, and to his many fin-de-siecle brasseries. Garcia's designs also grace the interiors of the Musee Carnavalet and the Musee de la Vie Romantique-and his most recent tour de force is the restoration of Paris' Hetel Mansart. Garcia's most ambitious project to date, the refurbishment of the Cheteau du Champ de Bataille in Normandy, attracts visitors from across the globe and has become a monument to his art and celebrity. This new edition of the 1999 book is a continuing tribute to the restoration of the cheteau and to its magnificent garderns, seen here for the first time. Sumptuously illustrated and updated to include Garcia's latest creations, this new edition provides the reader with a privileged view of true French style.

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Grand Central Terminal, interior
Grand Central Terminal, interior
Grand Central Terminal is one of America's finest examples of the Beaux-Arts style. The monumental, sober classical vocabulary of the building is enlivened by rich sculptural detail of a Baroque exuberance. Not only in style, but in siting and plan, Grand Central is the quintessence of Beaux-Arts design principals. Beaux-Arts principles emphasize the expression of a building's function through its design. In discussing Grand Central, Whitney Warren proclaimed "Modern cities have no portals or arches of triumph. The real gateways are the railroad stations."18 The exterior of Grand Central expresses this function, for the facades of the building closely resemble ancient triumphal arches, the gateways to Imperial Roman cities. The allusion is most direct on the main entrance facade. Above the podium crested by the first story, three, great round-arched windows are enframed by engaged fluted columns upon a high stylobate. These Roman Doric columns visually support the cornice and attic story above. Even the depth of a triumphal arch Is suggested, since the east and west facades of the building are recessed at the corners. The triumphal arches at east and west project forward slightly, reiterating the 42nd Street facade motif on a slightly reduced scale. The main facade of Grand Central is crowned by the justifiably famous sculptural group created by the French artist Jules Alexis Coutan. The. sculpture, a "tribute to commerce depicts a triumphant Mercury, god of commerce and travel, flanked by a reclining Hercules, the hero famed for physical strength and moral courage, and Minerva, goddess of wisdom and patroness of artists and artisans. The huge group - roughly 50 feet tail - is perfectly scaled to the monumental facade and plays an integral part in the architectural composition, functioning as the dramatic climax to the whole. Few buildings in New York enjoy a more impressive, setting than does. Grand Central. From Park Avenue, south of Grand Central, one approaches the triumphal facade, enframed by the buildings along the Avenue, and visible from nearly a mile away. The architects, by raising the building on the podium created by the elevated driveways, enhanced Grand Central's visibility and intensified the dramatic focus. Although the site of Grand Central was determined by purely practical considerations, (the location of the railroad trackage), it nevertheless has much in common with the sitings of Beaux-Arts buildings in Paris, which frequently are placed at the termination of the. city's grand boulevards. Planning and spatial organization, are central to Beaux-Arts theory. The. interiors of Grand Central, designed by the associated firms of Warren & Wetmore and Reed & Stem, are a paradigmatic expression of these concerns, displaying the order and clarity, the amplitude and grandeur which was the goal of the Beaux-Arts approach. The plan of Grand Central, hailed as "a model of coherence and clarity," is symmetrically disposed with a series of axially aligned, major spaces - the Waiting Room and Concourses - connected, by passageways and ramps. These ramps, unlike stairways, enhance the sense of easy progress and transition, and also facilitate-circulation. On entering Grand Central, one senses the directionalized quality of the plan - a Beaux-Arts concern. Movement forward and gradually downward toward the actual train track platforms is suggested by the axiality of the plan, while lateral ancillary spaces contribute a sense of spatial flow and freedom, harmoniously balancing the dominant forward impetus. In addition, the plan of Grand Central allows not only for ease of circulation within the building itself, but also for easy entrance and exit. The terminal functions as a center of transfer - "a great reciprocating engine for pumping a huge flow of pedestrian traffic. " The noted architectural historian Carroll Meeks has termed this plan "a brilliant design" and continued "no better station of its size has ever been built." The. interior of Grand Central relies not only on its planning for its impressiveness, but also on what the architectural critic Lewis Mum-ford has characterized as "its major quality.... space - generously and even nobly handled."" Beaux-Arts design attains much of its magnificence through monumental scaling and few interiors better illustrate this principle. At Grand Central, the Associated Architects handled the ancillary spaces monumentally end thus these spaces serve an an appropriate and essential introduction to the Main Concourse, the climax of the entire composition. The Main Concourse, "breathtakingly grand," and in the opinion of the eminent architectural historian, Henry-Russell Hitchcock, "one of the grandest spaces the early 20th century ever enclosed" has captured the affection and admiration of generations of travelers. Aside from the fineness of the plan a
Grand Central Terminal, interior
Grand Central Terminal, interior
If you look careful, to the left of the left window,by the equator mark, there's a small rectangular brown patch. It was left there by renovators to remind everyone of the dirt that covered the ceiling prior to the renovation. Grand Central Terminal is one of America's finest examples of the Beaux-Arts style. The monumental, sober classical vocabulary of the building is enlivened by rich sculptural detail of a Baroque exuberance. Not only in style, but in siting and plan, Grand Central is the quintessence of Beaux-Arts design principals. Beaux-Arts principles emphasize the expression of a building's function through its design. In discussing Grand Central, Whitney Warren proclaimed "Modern cities have no portals or arches of triumph. The real gateways are the railroad stations."18 The exterior of Grand Central expresses this function, for the facades of the building closely resemble ancient triumphal arches, the gateways to Imperial Roman cities. The allusion is most direct on the main entrance facade. Above the podium crested by the first story, three, great round-arched windows are enframed by engaged fluted columns upon a high stylobate. These Roman Doric columns visually support the cornice and attic story above. Even the depth of a triumphal arch Is suggested, since the east and west facades of the building are recessed at the corners. The triumphal arches at east and west project forward slightly, reiterating the 42nd Street facade motif on a slightly reduced scale. The main facade of Grand Central is crowned by the justifiably famous sculptural group created by the French artist Jules Alexis Coutan. The. sculpture, a "tribute to commerce depicts a triumphant Mercury, god of commerce and travel, flanked by a reclining Hercules, the hero famed for physical strength and moral courage, and Minerva, goddess of wisdom and patroness of artists and artisans. The huge group - roughly 50 feet tail - is perfectly scaled to the monumental facade and plays an integral part in the architectural composition, functioning as the dramatic climax to the whole. Few buildings in New York enjoy a more impressive, setting than does. Grand Central. From Park Avenue, south of Grand Central, one approaches the triumphal facade, enframed by the buildings along the Avenue, and visible from nearly a mile away. The architects, by raising the building on the podium created by the elevated driveways, enhanced Grand Central's visibility and intensified the dramatic focus. Although the site of Grand Central was determined by purely practical considerations, (the location of the railroad trackage), it nevertheless has much in common with the sitings of Beaux-Arts buildings in Paris, which frequently are placed at the termination of the. city's grand boulevards. Planning and spatial organization, are central to Beaux-Arts theory. The. interiors of Grand Central, designed by the associated firms of Warren & Wetmore and Reed & Stem, are a paradigmatic expression of these concerns, displaying the order and clarity, the amplitude and grandeur which was the goal of the Beaux-Arts approach. The plan of Grand Central, hailed as "a model of coherence and clarity," is symmetrically disposed with a series of axially aligned, major spaces - the Waiting Room and Concourses - connected, by passageways and ramps. These ramps, unlike stairways, enhance the sense of easy progress and transition, and also facilitate-circulation. On entering Grand Central, one senses the directionalized quality of the plan - a Beaux-Arts concern. Movement forward and gradually downward toward the actual train track platforms is suggested by the axiality of the plan, while lateral ancillary spaces contribute a sense of spatial flow and freedom, harmoniously balancing the dominant forward impetus. In addition, the plan of Grand Central allows not only for ease of circulation within the building itself, but also for easy entrance and exit. The terminal functions as a center of transfer - "a great reciprocating engine for pumping a huge flow of pedestrian traffic. " The noted architectural historian Carroll Meeks has termed this plan "a brilliant design" and continued "no better station of its size has ever been built." The. interior of Grand Central relies not only on its planning for its impressiveness, but also on what the architectural critic Lewis Mum-ford has characterized as "its major quality.... space - generously and even nobly handled."" Beaux-Arts design attains much of its magnificence through monumental scaling and few interiors better illustrate this principle. At Grand Central, the Associated Architects handled the ancillary spaces monumentally end thus these spaces serve an an appropriate and essential introduction to the Main Concourse, the climax of the entire composition. The Main Concourse, "breathtakingly grand," and in the opinion of the eminent archite

french style interior decorating
french style interior decorating
French Seaside Style
The fourth title in a successful series, this new book celebrates the enduring popularity of nautically inspired interiors, with a French twist. Azure blue skies and sparkling waves on the horizon are the perfect counterpoints to the bright and cheery interiors inspired by life at the seaside. Sun-drenched terraces are accessorized with nautical details including smooth bits of sea glass, rows of sand dollars, and miniature sailboats on the windowsill. Driftwood centerpieces remind us of the beauty and simplicity of nature. A collection of oars propped in a corner forms a rustic sculpture, and the wide stripes of the lounge chairs beckon, evoking the laid-back allure of warm weather. Stepping inside, the rooms are equally inviting with earth tones and bright touches, accessorized with the classically popular icons—anchors, buoys, lighthouses, seashells—that carry the theme throughout the home. Natural wood finishes set the tone and are the perfect complement to canvas-inspired upholstery and crisp linens in the fresh colors of summertime. Miniature vials of sand, each labeled with the date and location where they were collected, bring back memories of carefree holidays spent by the sea, while frosty gem-colored goblets cool us down even before the first sip of mint julep. The overall sense of these interiors creates a relaxed sense of well-being that feeds the soul. These interiors are brimming with inspiration for how to bring serenity and joy into any home.

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