1923 S SILVER DOLLAR. 1923 S

1923 s silver dollar. Sterling silver buyers.

1923 S Silver Dollar


1923 s silver dollar
    silver dollar
  • Silver dollar is a common name given to a number of species of Metynnis, a tropical fish belonging to the Characidae family which is closely related to piranha and pacu.
  • a dollar made of silver
  • honesty: southeastern European plant cultivated for its fragrant purplish flowers and round flat papery silver-white seedpods that are used for indoor decoration
    1923
  • 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar.

Palmer House, Chicago
Palmer House, Chicago
Downtown Chicago, Zuiko 12-60mm/2.8-4.0 SWD. The Palmer House Hilton is a famous and historic hotel in downtown Chicago. History There have been three Palmer House Hotels at the corner of State and Monroe Streets in Chicago. The first (known as "The Palmer") was built as a wedding present from Potter Palmer to his bride Bertha Honore. It opened on September 26, 1871, but burned down just thirteen days later October 9, 1871 in the Great Chicago Fire. Palmer immediately set to work rebuilding, and with a $1.7 million signature loan (believed to be the largest individual loan ever secured at the time) constructed one of the fanciest hotels in post-fire Chicago. Designed by architect John M. Van Osdel, the new hotel was seven stories. Its amenities included oversized rooms, luxurious decor, and sumptuous meals served in grand style. The floor of its barber shop was reputedly tiled with silver dollars. Constructed mainly of iron and brick, the hotel was widely advertised as, "The World's Only Fire Proof Hotel." Famous visitors included presidential hopefuls James Garfield, Grover Cleveland, Ulysses S. Grant, William Jennings Bryan and William McKinley; writers Mark Twain, Charles Dickens, and Oscar Wilde; and actress Sarah Bernhardt. It was completed in 1875. By the 1920s, the business in downtown Chicago could support a much larger facility and the Palmer Estate decided to erect a new 25-story hotel. They hired Holabird & Roche to design the building. Between 1923 and 1925, the hotel was rebuilt on the same site — in stages so not a single day of business was lost. At the time it was touted as the largest hotel in the world. In December 1945, Conrad Hilton bought the Palmer House for $20 million. In 2005 it was sold to Thor Equities, but it remains part of the Hilton chain. As of July 2007, the hotel is open for business while being renovated, under the name "Palmer House Hilton" - rather than the usual Hilton logo, it uses a P surrounded by a wreath. As of December 31, 2005, there were a total of 1,639 guest rooms in the hotel, making it the 2nd largest hotel in the city after the Hyatt Regency Chicago.
Mary Harris, 1923
Mary Harris, 1923
Photographed 15 August 1923 at the State Reformatory for Women, Long Bay NSW. I thought it would be easy to track down the stylishly dressed woman in this offender photograph. The name ‘Mary Harris’ has been scratched into the emulsion side of the glass plate by the photographer and is clearly visible on the right side of this image. The date the photograph was taken at Long Bay gaol is also evident which gives a rough indication of when she appeared before a court. Despite all the information I gleaned from the negative itself no record of her conviction appeared in the usual sources. A trip to the New South Wales State Records repository, located at Kingswood, was necessary before her story could be told. Mary Harris was only 18 years old when she entered Long Bay Gaol. She was convicted of vagrancy and received a short custodial sentence. Her criminal record sheet showed that during 1923 she had accumulated two other convictions for vagrancy but it seems she may have paid a fine to avoid serving time. The obvious problem with this conviction is that she does not look like a vagrant, a term which conjures up an image of a hobo or tramp with no fixed address. Harris wears a luxurious fur and has even accessorized it with a fur hat. Her hair is shiny and her white stockings are pristine - she certainly doesn’t look homeless. In all probability she wasn’t. Women charged with ‘vagrancy’, ‘indecent behaviour’ and ‘disorderly conduct’ where often, although not always, street prostitutes. Prostitution was an unlawful occupation and the term ‘vagrancy’ encompassed all those who had no visible or legal means of support. It was a useful charge for police to use, as they only needed to prove that a woman did not have a job or a male who supported her financially instead of the more complicated task of proving she was soliciting men for sex.

1923 s silver dollar