1920'S DECORATING IDEAS - DECORATING IDEAS

1920's decorating ideas - Christmas decoration idea.

1920's Decorating Ideas


1920's decorating ideas
    decorating
  • Confer an award or medal on (a member of the armed forces)
  • (decorate) deck: be beautiful to look at; "Flowers adorned the tables everywhere"
  • (decorate) award a mark of honor, such as a medal, to; "He was decorated for his services in the military"
  • Provide (a room or building) with a color scheme, paint, wallpaper, etc
  • Make (something) look more attractive by adding ornament to it
  • (decorate) make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"
    1920's
  • File:1920s decade montage.png|From left, clockwise: Third Tipperary Brigade Flying Column No. 2 under Sean Hogan during the Irish Civil War; Prohibition agents destroying barrels of alcohol in accordance to the 18th amendment, which made alcoholic beverages illegal throughout the entire decade;
    ideas
  • (idea) the content of cognition; the main thing you are thinking about; "it was not a good idea"; "the thought never entered my mind"
  • A thought or suggestion as to a possible course of action
  • A concept or mental impression
  • (idea) mind: your intention; what you intend to do; "he had in mind to see his old teacher"; "the idea of the game is to capture all the pieces"
  • An opinion or belief
  • (idea) a personal view; "he has an idea that we don't like him"
1920's decorating ideas - Dennison's Bogie
Dennison's Bogie Book -- A 1920 Guide for Vintage Decorating and Entertaining at Halloween and Thanksgiving (8th Edition)
Dennison's Bogie Book -- A 1920 Guide for Vintage Decorating and Entertaining at Halloween and Thanksgiving (8th Edition)
Originally published in 1920, this Bogie Book features the following ideas and suggestions for planning and decorating for vintage Halloween and Thanksgiving celebrations: stairway decorations; spider's parlor; father time celebrating Halloween; a story to tell as the hour grows late; window seat made Halloweeny; table and Jack Horner pie guarded by wise old owls; pumpkin favors, including instructions to make a wire frame pumpkin to cover in crepe or tissue paper; house that crepe paper builds; table decorations made from napkins and crepe paper; old time games and stunts for halloween including: family ghosts, T-puzzle, witchery, numbers of mystery, signs of the times, Halloween anagrams, talking pumpkin and much more; Halloween menus; halls at Halloween; instructions for making crepe paper caps; detailed costume making instructions for four costumes (for plans and instructions for more Halloween costumes, please see our Dennison Costume listings); autumn table; instructions for making a wire horn of plenty for Thanksgiving; how to mount designs on cardboard. Centerpieces, favors and novelty suggestions and ideas fill this book as well as instructions for working with crepe, wrapping wires, twisting festoons, making fringe, etc., to make each of your projects a success. The Dennison Bogie books featured amazingly creative displays of festooned crepe swags and garland, hanging decorations depicting witches, ghosts, scary pumpkins, black cats and other symbols we associate with Halloween as well as a vast array of games and favors. The Bogie Books were a great source for party planning, each year showing different ideas to match the new products being released by Dennison. They continue to be a great resource for party planning and provide interesting old-time party tips and suggestions. Sample book pages are shown at the top of this page. ***FOR MORE BOGIE BOOKS, please see our other listings***

79% (12)
Ah Dusty's
Ah Dusty's
At the Creekside The Deadhorse Since Dusty's is one of the oldest bars in the valley it should come as no surprise to anyone that it has had different names and different looks over the years. In the seventies it was operated as Le Club, a happening night-spot that has been mentioned in a previous column. In the eighties the mountain took over the operation of all food service outlets, ousted the Greeks, and changed the name of the little bar at the bottom of the mountain to Dusty's. They may have re-named it Dusty's, but it rapidly became known as the Deadhorse. Now the Deadhorse may seem like a really strange name for a bar but that's what everybody called it. They called it that because the centerpiece of the bar was, no kidding, a dead horse. The poor animal was forever frozen in a bucking position, back arched and legs extended. He was dressed in his saddle and tack. This dead animal came from the southern United States. He had been a famous Texas bronco horse in the 1920's. His name was Dusty. Apparently he liked to travel. He arrived in the valley after Whistler Mountains' manager of Food Services, Werner de Filla, completed a tour of the south-western U.S.searching for new menu ideas. The Greeks were a hard act to follow. Werner came back with a Santa-Fe/Mexican menu and a dead horse. Werner might have thought that since Roy Rogers had stuffed Trigger such a thing was fashionable. Tasteful, even. Many in Whistler thought it was just weird. A stuffed dead horse can't help but attract attention in a ski town bar. The management quickly found it had to come up with a rule about riding the horse because some people apparently found it impossible to leave the bar after two or ten beers without first mounting the old bucking bronco. The rule was that anyone who got on the horses back - with their clothes on - had to buy the house a round. Of course the corollary of that rule was that anyone who got on the horse without clothes did not have to buy the house a round. That led to some interesting bareback rides. The last one was probably made by a newly hired, and rather attractive, marketing type. She enthusiastically rode the bucking bronco, bouncing up and down completely topless, to the enthusiastic approbation of all the men in the room. Much to the disappointment of the aforementioned men who had hoped her ride would often be repeated her employment was terminated shortly after her first, and last, midnight ride. Apparently mountain management did not approve. The horse figured in some April Fools Day pranks. He pretty much had to, didn't he? He ended up on top of a tower on the Little Red Chair one year. It can't have been easy to get a stuffed horse on top of a lift tower but somebody managed it. No one ever admitted to that prank but doesn't it stand to reason that the horse wasn't carried up to the Little Red line on someone's back? Skiers loading up the Red Chair on another April First were treated to the sight of the dead horse frozen in mid-buck on, well where else would they put him? Once again, it's unlikely that he was carried half way up a run by people on foot. And for anyone who doesn't know the trails on Whistler, they put him on Pony Trail, of course, of course. Towards the end, he also managed to get himself up to the Peak. The horse decorated, if that is the correct term, the bar named after him for a number of years but as time passed he got more and more bedraggled. In spite of the house rule about riding Dusty newcomers occasionally climbed on his back. Beer was spilled on his flanks. He started to look really ratty. Maintenance staff couldn't figure out how to clean a dead horse. Vacuuming him didn't seem to do much. Brushing him didn't restore any luster to his coat, it just pulled out clumps of hair. The mountain tried to auction him off at charity events but everyone who bought him donated him back to the bar. Finally a young couple living in Pemberton won him as a door prize at a Winterhawks fund-raiser. They were delighted because they had just bought a (live) horse and they had also just discovered how much saddles cost. They took the saddle off him and moved him to the voly cabin locker room. They sold him to a guy who wanted to play a prank on a buddy of his who was a fisherman. They donated the money they received from the sale to Timmy's Telethon. That wasn't quite the end of this horse story though. Dusty traveled around the valley in the back of a pick-up for a while as a snow covered lump. Then one day a kayaker spotted him in the bottom of the Cheakamus river. Not knowing he'd spotted a stuffed horse the startled kayaker called the RCMP who ended up sending a dive team to recover what they assumed was a recently deceased horse. They even drew a picture of his brand and tried to find out who had owned him. They finally realized that they were trying to locate the owners of a sixty year old stuffed horse
Dusty's
Dusty's
March 1998 The Deadhorse Since Dusty's is one of the oldest bars in the valley it should come as no surprise to anyone that it has had different names and different looks over the years. In the seventies it was operated as Le Club, a happening night-spot that has been mentioned in a previous column. In the eighties the mountain took over the operation of all food service outlets, ousted the Greeks, and changed the name of the little bar at the bottom of the mountain to Dusty's. They may have re-named it Dusty's, but it rapidly became known as the Deadhorse. Now the Deadhorse may seem like a really strange name for a bar but that's what everybody called it. They called it that because the centerpiece of the bar was, no kidding, a dead horse. The poor animal was forever frozen in a bucking position, back arched and legs extended. He was dressed in his saddle and tack. This dead animal came from the southern United States. He had been a famous Texas bronco horse in the 1920's. His name was Dusty. Apparently he liked to travel. He arrived in the valley after Whistler Mountains' manager of Food Services, Werner de Filla, completed a tour of the south-western U.S.searching for new menu ideas. The Greeks were a hard act to follow. Werner came back with a Santa-Fe/Mexican menu and a dead horse. Werner might have thought that since Roy Rogers had stuffed Trigger such a thing was fashionable. Tasteful, even. Many in Whistler thought it was just weird. A stuffed dead horse can't help but attract attention in a ski town bar. The management quickly found it had to come up with a rule about riding the horse because some people apparently found it impossible to leave the bar after two or ten beers without first mounting the old bucking bronco. The rule was that anyone who got on the horses back - with their clothes on - had to buy the house a round. Of course the corollary of that rule was that anyone who got on the horse without clothes did not have to buy the house a round. That led to some interesting bareback rides. The last one was probably made by a newly hired, and rather attractive, marketing type. She enthusiastically rode the bucking bronco, bouncing up and down completely topless, to the enthusiastic approbation of all the men in the room. Much to the disappointment of the aforementioned men who had hoped her ride would often be repeated her employment was terminated shortly after her first, and last, midnight ride. Apparently mountain management did not approve. The horse figured in some April Fools Day pranks. He pretty much had to, didn't he? He ended up on top of a tower on the Little Red Chair one year. It can't have been easy to get a stuffed horse on top of a lift tower but somebody managed it. No one ever admitted to that prank but doesn't it stand to reason that the horse wasn't carried up to the Little Red line on someone's back? Skiers loading up the Red Chair on another April First were treated to the sight of the dead horse frozen in mid-buck on, well where else would they put him? Once again, it's unlikely that he was carried half way up a run by people on foot. And for anyone who doesn't know the trails on Whistler, they put him on Pony Trail, of course, of course. Towards the end, he also managed to get himself up to the Peak. The horse decorated, if that is the correct term, the bar named after him for a number of years but as time passed he got more and more bedraggled. In spite of the house rule about riding Dusty newcomers occasionally climbed on his back. Beer was spilled on his flanks. He started to look really ratty. Maintenance staff couldn't figure out how to clean a dead horse. Vacuuming him didn't seem to do much. Brushing him didn't restore any luster to his coat, it just pulled out clumps of hair. The mountain tried to auction him off at charity events but everyone who bought him donated him back to the bar. Finally a young couple living in Pemberton won him as a door prize at a Winterhawks fund-raiser. They were delighted because they had just bought a (live) horse and they had also just discovered how much saddles cost. They took the saddle off him and moved him to the voly cabin locker room. They sold him to a guy who wanted to play a prank on a buddy of his who was a fisherman. They donated the money they received from the sale to Timmy's Telethon. That wasn't quite the end of this horse story though. Dusty traveled around the valley in the back of a pick-up for a while as a snow covered lump. Then one day a kayaker spotted him in the bottom of the Cheakamus river. Not knowing he'd spotted a stuffed horse the startled kayaker called the RCMP who ended up sending a dive team to recover what they assumed was a recently deceased horse. They even drew a picture of his brand and tried to find out who had owned him. They finally realized that they were trying to locate the owners of a sixty year old stuffed horse.

1920's decorating ideas
1920's decorating ideas
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