1973 WHEEL HORSE : WHEEL HORSE

1973 Wheel Horse : Triad Color Wheel.

1973 Wheel Horse


1973 wheel horse
    wheel horse
  • A responsible and hardworking person, esp. an experienced and conscientious member of a political party
  • Wheel Horse was a manufacturer of outdoor and garden power equipment, including lawn and garden tractors. The company's headquarters were in South Bend, Indiana.
  • An intimate friend, one's right hand man.
  • A horse harnessed nearest the wheels of a vehicle
  • a draft horse harnessed behind others and nearest the wheels of a vehicle
    1973
  • 1973 may refer to: *The year 1973 *"1973" (song), by James Blunt
  • 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar.
  • "1973" is the first single released from James Blunt's second studio album All the Lost Souls.
1973 wheel horse - Jeremy
Jeremy
Jeremy
Should I call her? What will I say? Will she think I'm a geek? Will she be right? Falling in love is never easy, but when you're 15, it's excruciating! Robby Benson (in a Golden GlobeA(r)-nominated performance) and Glynnis O'Connor star in this warm, funny and "beautifully touching" (Family Circle) romance. Life's never been too challenging for Jeremy Jones (Benson). He makes straight A's, plays first-chair cello in the school orchestra and picks the winning horses at the tracknearly every time! But things get pretty complicated when he meets Susan Rollins (O'Connor). She's the most beautiful girl he's ever laid eyes on and he doesn't have the slightest idea what to do about it!

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Home is where the heart is, on the beach.
Home is where the heart is, on the beach.
HDR, Panorama made from 35 images (; The Santa Monica Pier is located at the foot of Colorado Avenue in Santa Monica, California and is a prominent, 100-year-old landmark. Santa Monica has had several piers over the years, however the current Santa Monica Pier is actually two adjoining piers that long had separate owners. The long, narrow Municipal Pier opened September 9, 1909, primarily to carry sewer pipes beyond the breakers, and had no amenities. The short, wide adjoining Pleasure Pier to the south, a.k.a. Newcomb Pier, was built in 1916 by Charles I. D. Looff and his son Arthur, amusement park pioneers. The Carousel was built in 1922 on the Pleasure Pier and features 44 hand-carved horses. It was rebuilt in 1990 inside the Looff Hippodrome. A calliope provides musical accompaniment. The La Monica Ballroom opened in 1924 and closed in 1962. The La Monica Ballroom became home to Spade Cooley in the early fifties. From 1958 until 1962 it served as a roller skating rink, first as Skater's Ballroom and then Santa Monica Roller Rink. The speed skating club won many state and regional championships. The bridge to the pier and entry gate were built in 1938 by the federal Works Project Administration, and replaced the former grade connection. The Looff Pier, then known as Newcomb Pier, was acquired by the city in the 1953. In the 1960s various plans were proposed that would entail removal of the pier. The strangest one called for the construction of an artificial island with a 1500-room hotel. It was approved by the City Council, but citizens formed "Save the Santa Monica Bay" to preserve the pier.[2] The outstanding order to raze the pier was revoked by the city council in 1973. That same year the Carousel and Hippodrome were memorable sets in the film The Sting, although the story was set in Chicago. In the 1950’s Enid Newcomb suggested to family friend Morris “Pops” Gordon that his two sons, George and Eugene, purchase and operate the Pier’s arcade. It didn’t take much persuasion, for the Gordons instantly took to the Pier and ultimately made Playland Arcade into the Pier’s longest running enterprise offering the day’s contemporary games alongside those of yesterday, providing inexpensive entertainment to a diverse crowd. George’s daughters Marlene and Joanie have kept the business within the family, and the next generation of Gordons is already in training to maintain the family tradition. Night Tide, Bean, The Sting, A Night at the Roxbury, Miracle Beach, Titanic, Forrest Gump (there is a Bubba Gump Shrimp Company Restaurant on the pier, owned by the company that produced the film), Not Another Teen Movie, Iron Man, Desperate Teenage Lovedolls, Dark Ride, Cellular, The Hottie and the Nottie, Ruthless People, Falling Down, Love Stinks and in The Hannah Montana Movie during the scene with Lilly's birthday party, were all filmed at this pier. At the end of Hancock, two of the main characters take their young son through the park when they receive a phone call from the title character.
Santa Monica Pier
Santa Monica Pier
HDR, Panorama made from 95 images (; The Santa Monica Pier is located at the foot of Colorado Avenue in Santa Monica, California and is a prominent, 100-year-old landmark. Santa Monica has had several piers over the years, however the current Santa Monica Pier is actually two adjoining piers that long had separate owners. The long, narrow Municipal Pier opened September 9, 1909, primarily to carry sewer pipes beyond the breakers, and had no amenities. The short, wide adjoining Pleasure Pier to the south, a.k.a. Newcomb Pier, was built in 1916 by Charles I. D. Looff and his son Arthur, amusement park pioneers. The Carousel was built in 1922 on the Pleasure Pier and features 44 hand-carved horses. It was rebuilt in 1990 inside the Looff Hippodrome. A calliope provides musical accompaniment. The La Monica Ballroom opened in 1924 and closed in 1962. The La Monica Ballroom became home to Spade Cooley in the early fifties. From 1958 until 1962 it served as a roller skating rink, first as Skater's Ballroom and then Santa Monica Roller Rink. The speed skating club won many state and regional championships. The bridge to the pier and entry gate were built in 1938 by the federal Works Project Administration, and replaced the former grade connection. The Looff Pier, then known as Newcomb Pier, was acquired by the city in the 1953. In the 1960s various plans were proposed that would entail removal of the pier. The strangest one called for the construction of an artificial island with a 1500-room hotel. It was approved by the City Council, but citizens formed "Save the Santa Monica Bay" to preserve the pier.[2] The outstanding order to raze the pier was revoked by the city council in 1973. That same year the Carousel and Hippodrome were memorable sets in the film The Sting, although the story was set in Chicago. In the 1950’s Enid Newcomb suggested to family friend Morris “Pops” Gordon that his two sons, George and Eugene, purchase and operate the Pier’s arcade. It didn’t take much persuasion, for the Gordons instantly took to the Pier and ultimately made Playland Arcade into the Pier’s longest running enterprise offering the day’s contemporary games alongside those of yesterday, providing inexpensive entertainment to a diverse crowd. George’s daughters Marlene and Joanie have kept the business within the family, and the next generation of Gordons is already in training to maintain the family tradition. Night Tide, Bean, The Sting, A Night at the Roxbury, Miracle Beach, Titanic, Forrest Gump (there is a Bubba Gump Shrimp Company Restaurant on the pier, owned by the company that produced the film), Not Another Teen Movie, Iron Man, Desperate Teenage Lovedolls, Dark Ride, Cellular, The Hottie and the Nottie, Ruthless People, Falling Down, Love Stinks and in The Hannah Montana Movie during the scene with Lilly's birthday party, were all filmed at this pier. At the end of Hancock, two of the main characters take their young son through the park when they receive a phone call from the title character.

1973 wheel horse
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