1891 SILVER DOLLAR VALUE - 1891 SILVER

1891 silver dollar value - 2005 silver eagles.

1891 Silver Dollar Value


1891 silver dollar value
    silver dollar
  • a dollar made of silver
  • honesty: southeastern European plant cultivated for its fragrant purplish flowers and round flat papery silver-white seedpods that are used for indoor decoration
  • Silver dollar is a common name given to a number of species of Metynnis, a tropical fish belonging to the Characidae family which is closely related to piranha and pacu.
    1891
  • 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year that started on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar).
1891 silver dollar value - Forts of
Forts of the American Frontier 1776-1891: California, Oregon, Washington, and Alaska (Fortress)
Forts of the American Frontier 1776-1891: California, Oregon, Washington, and Alaska (Fortress)
This title explores the contribution made by settlers, explorers, traders and goldseekers of various nations to the nascent architecture of the West Coast of the United States. In doing so, it charts the progress westwards of those who claimed new land as their own, and defended it with forts and blockhouses, and the resulting conflicts with indigenous Native American peoples. Packed with detailed illustrations, this book provides a fascinating study of the westward advance of modern America, and covers sites such as Fort Point at the entrance to San Francisco Bay, the Presidio of San Francisco, Fort Guijarros in San Diego, California, Fort Humboldt in Eureka, California, Sutter's Fort, the 19th-century agricultural and trade colony in California, and Fort Vancouver National Historic Site in Washington and Oregon.

79% (14)
Meteor Crater, Arizona Mining Site
Meteor Crater, Arizona Mining Site
The crater came to the attention of scientists following its discovery by European settlers in the 19th century. Dubbed the Canyon Diablo crater – from Canyon Diablo, Arizona, the closest community to the crater in the late 19th century, 12 miles (19 km) northwest of the crater, but now a ghost town – it had initially been ascribed to the actions of a volcano. This was not an unreasonable assumption, as the San Francisco volcanic field lies only about 40 miles (64 km) to the west. In 1891 Grove Karl Gilbert, chief geologist for the U.S. Geological Survey, investigated the crater and concluded that it was the result of a volcanic steam explosion. Gilbert had assumed that if it were an impact crater then the volume of the crater, as well as meteoritic material, should be present on the rim. Gilbert also assumed a large portion of the meteorite should be buried in the crater and that this would generate a large magnetic anomaly. Gilbert's calculations showed that the volume of the crater and the debris on the rim were roughly equivalent, so that the mass of the hypothetical impactor was missing. Further there were no magnetic anomalies. Gilbert argued that the meteorite fragments found on the rim were coincidental. Gilbert would publicize these conclusions in a series of lectures in 1895. In 1892 Gilbert would be among the first to propose that the moon's craters were caused by impact rather than volcanism. In 1903, mining engineer and businessman Daniel M. Barringer suggested that the crater had been produced by the impact of a large iron-metallic meteorite. Barringer's company, the Standard Iron Company, received a patent signed by Theodore Roosevelt for 640 acres (2.6 km2) around the center of the crater in 1903. The claim was divided into four quadrants coming from the center clockwise from northwest named Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. In 1906 Roosevelt authorized the establishment of a newly named Meteor, Arizona post office (the closest post office before was 30 miles (48 km) away in Winslow, Arizona). Standard Iron Company conducted research on the crater's origins between 1903 and 1905. It concluded that the crater had indeed been caused by an impact. Barringer and his partner, the mathematician and physicist Benjamin Chew Tilghman, documented evidence for the impact theory in papers presented to the U.S. Geological Survey in 1906 and published in the Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. Barringer's arguments were met with skepticism, as there was a reluctance at the time to consider the role of meteorites in terrestrial geology. He persisted and sought to bolster his theory by locating the remains of the meteorite. At the time of first discovery by Europeans, the surrounding plains were covered with about 30 tons of large oxidized iron meteorite fragments. This led Barringer to believe that the bulk of the impactor could still be found under the crater floor. Impact physics was poorly understood at the time and Barringer was unaware that most of the meteorite vaporized on impact. He spent 27 years trying to locate a large deposit of meteoric iron, and drilled to a depth of 419 m (1,376 ft), but no significant deposit was ever found. Barringer, who in 1894 was one of the investors who made $15 million in the Commonwealth silver mine in Pearce, Arizona in Cochise County, Arizona, had ambitious plans for the iron ore. He estimated from the size of the crater that the meteorite had a mass of 100 million tons. The current estimate of 300,000 tons for the impactor is only three-tenths of one percent of Barringer's estimate. Iron ore of the type found at the crater was valued at the time at $125/ton so Barringer believed he was searching for lode worth more than a billion 1903 dollars. Despite Barringer's findings and other excavations in the early 20th century, geologists' skepticism continued until the 1950s when planetary science gained in maturity and understanding of cratering processes increased. Professor Herman Leroy Fairchild, an early promoter of impact cratering, argued Barringer's case in an article in Science in 1930. It was not until 1960 that later research by Eugene Merle Shoemaker would confirm Barringer's hypothesis. The key discovery was the presence in the crater of the mineral stishovite, a rare form of silica found only where quartz-bearing rocks have been severely shocked by an instantaneous overpressure. It cannot be created by volcanic action; the only known mechanism of creating it is through an impact event (or artificially through a nuclear explosion). Shoemaker's discovery is considered the first definitive proof of an extraterrestrial impact on the Earth's surface. Since then, numerous impact craters have been identified around the world, though Meteor Crater remains one of the most visually impressive due to its size, young age and lack of vegetation cover. On August 8, 1964, a pair of commercial pilots in a Cessna 150 flew low over the crater.
1891-Loomis "Salt Box" Home
1891-Loomis "Salt Box" Home
The Loomis house, built in 1891, served as a Norwalk residence for 88 years. This was a typical "salt box" type house which was rather unique for the area. The house was built on the corner of Walnut and Elaine. A salt box type home in Norwalk was unusual even in 1891.

1891 silver dollar value