MEALS ON WHEELS INC : MEALS ON

MEALS ON WHEELS INC : 18 WHEELS OF STEEL HAULIN ADDONS

Meals On Wheels Inc


meals on wheels inc
    wheels
  • (wheel) a simple machine consisting of a circular frame with spokes (or a solid disc) that can rotate on a shaft or axle (as in vehicles or other machines)
  • A circular object that revolves on an axle and forms part of a machine
  • (wheel) change directions as if revolving on a pivot; "They wheeled their horses around and left"
  • A circular object that revolves on an axle and is fixed below a vehicle or other object to enable it to move easily over the ground
  • Used in reference to the cycle of a specified condition or set of events
  • steering wheel: a handwheel that is used for steering
    meals
  • The food eaten on such an occasion
  • (meal) the food served and eaten at one time
  • (meal) coarsely ground foodstuff; especially seeds of various cereal grasses or pulse
  • Any of the regular occasions in a day when a reasonably large amount of food is eaten, such as breakfast, lunch, or dinner
  • (meal) any of the occasions for eating food that occur by custom or habit at more or less fixed times

Ruins built on a strong foundation
Ruins built on a strong foundation
0 PHOTOGRAPH PARTICULARS 0 These photographs are from the Square Tower section of Hovenweep National Monument. An outlier of Chaco Canyon, it is a good place to get a feel for the architecture and “place” where the Anasazi briefly prospered, then moved and dispersed (becoming the Hopi, Zuni, and other modern Pueblo people of today). We took the rim trail loop which gives you a good look at the highly variable masonry buildings the Anasazi built. Buy and read the book: People of Chaco by Frederick Frazier before you visit Hovenweep or Chaco Canyon for a good understanding of the fantastic history of the people, who built these structures and lived out their lives here. If you read this book, you will also see why I had such an interest in traveling the Turquoise Trail and visiting Cerrillos, New Mexico. This is where the turquoise came from that was found in such abundance at Chaco Canyon….a stone very important to the ancient ones and modern day Pueblo people. At Hovenweep there are holes in the outside walls of many of the buildings designed to direct a shaft of light to a particular niche or place on a plaster wall in the interior to mark important celestial events (summer and winter solstices). 0 ACTIVITIES DAY FOUR OF TWELVE 0 Day Four was pretty much a “travel” day on this road trip. We left Moab Thursday morning and headed for Farmington, New Mexico. We took a short trip west into the start of the Needles district of Canyonlands NP to see Newspaper Rock. Years ago, my wife and I had traveled into the Needles district with our four wheel drive Isuzu Trooper, driven the sand wash down Salt Creek and Horse Canyon to hike to Fortress and Castle Arch. Ed and I decided at Newspaper Rock to back track a short ways and try a paved “loop” route into Monticello. We climbed high and steadily on FR 174. The views were outstanding. At a “T” we turned right to a small frozen lake set in an aspen grove (Shay Road to Aspen Flat). Returning to Forest Road 174 we almost made it to the summit, when we ran into snow on the road too deep to tackle. A newer car had been left in the middle of the road, where they had become stuck. We retraced our route down the side of the Abajo Mountains (Abajo translates to “under” in Spanish), then on to Blanding, Utah. Here we had one of the best meals on the trip (Homestead Steakhouse). We visited the modern “Edge of the Cedars” Native American museum at Blanding then drove to Hovenweep National Monument. I kept shaking my head at all the changes that had taken place over the years since my wife and I made trips to the area. In the 70s the Edge of the Cedars was just a dirt trail to an overlook and pour over by some cliff dwellings. Back then, we had driven miles of dirt road to Hovenweep, to an unmanned small ranger’s station and parked right next to Castle ruin. We hiked down into the canyon to square tower ruin. On the last trip I filmed my wife and our kids hiking the area with a VHS movie camera. But now, Ed and I drove his comfortable Jeep on paved roads all the way to a large modern well staffed visitors’ center at Hovenweep, where the trail out to Castle ruin is paved. No longer are you allowed to hike down into the canyon floor beside Square Tower ruin. That said, the loop hike along the rim that has been developed, the excellent visitors’ center, and the helpful rangers - - make a visit and hike worthwhile. It also provides more protection to the ruins that unfortunately, occasionally are vandalized. From Hovenweep we headed for Farmington via back roads, with me constantly having heated arguments with the GPS navigator I choose to call “The NUVI lady”. She is usually right but when she errs it is a big one. We didn’t travel the route we intended to Farmington, but we got there. Shiprock was a footnote stop on the way to Farmington. With rain in the area we didn’t want to take any of the dirt roads leading close to it, so satisfied ourselves with “roadside” snapshots of the brooding volcanic neck that was such a classic landmark to early travelers (Shiprock). 0 3,875 MILE/12 DAY ~ 4 CORNERS ROAD TRIP OVERVIEW 0 At the start of year 2011, I made tentative plans to take a two week solo “road trip” through the Four Corners area (The Colorado Plateau), during the last half of March. Then, if my wife could get the time needed off from her part time job, I also planned a “road trip” vacation to the Southwest, in April with her. When I put the plan together for the March trip, I decided to see if an old friend of mine, Ed (Flickr’s: OldWrangler), might be interested in joining me. I volunteered to take my old four wheel drive pickup truck and split the gasoline expense with him. We would each get an inexpensive motel room on the road to serve as “base camps” to hike, photograph, and explore back roads in the Four Corners area. Not only did Ed accept but he also proposed that we take his brand new 4-door Jeep Wrangler instead of my old pickup truck. That didn’t ta
Sunshine on my shoulders .....
Sunshine on my shoulders .....
0 PHOTOGRAPH PARTICULARS 0 Butler Arch (local name); Grosvenor Arch (map name honoring a big wig) is a great stop while driving The Cottonwood Canyon Road. Two nice cement picnic tables, restrooms and outstanding scenery make this a good place to take a break. Ravens had a brushy nest built up under one of the main arches of Butler Arch and were constantly flying between “lookout perches” on spires, over to their nest. I got a telephoto of the nest but it is a bit “untidy” to post on my Flickr site. At the picnic table a scrub jay [Aphelocoma coerulescens] took more than a casual interest in our well being, once we broke out the “food tote” to enjoy a bite to eat. We had to keep the top on the tote or the scrub jay would have owned half our food supply. Nothing like getting off a well traveled paved road (Utah highway 89) and slowing down, rolling down the windows, and proceeding at a slow comfortable pace along 50 miles of dirt road. Drive as slow as you like, stop where you want, enjoy the sights, the fragrance of sage, and “no schedule”. The “Cottonwood Canyon Road” is a gem. Last year when I drove it, floods had washed rocks and debris onto the road from side canyons, making it messy driving in places, requiring four wheel drive. On this drive, it was passenger car smooth, with no tricky spots at all. 0 ACTIVITIES DAY TEN OF TWELVE 0 If there was one day to “live again” on this road trip then day TEN was it. It was outstanding from start to finish. The weather was A1 perfect. We had a little dirt road travel with the windows of the Jeep rolled down and a lot of good photo ops at the many different places we traveled. Oh yes, a great meal at the Escalante Outfitters to end the day properly. We left Page, Arizona before dawn. We watched the sun come up over Navajo Mountain and Lake Powell. Then on to “The Toadstools” off highway 89 for a short hike and some great early morning light on those formations. We then backtracked 1.6 miles fto the Cottonwood road (a road I had driven recently in my pickup truck, only from north to south), and enjoyed a clear warm blue sky day drive up to Butler (Grosvenor) arch. From Butler arch, we went on to Kodachrome Basin, where we took a short three mile loop hike. I loved the campground at Kodachrome and have promised my wife that we will camp there together and take some of the longer hikes available in that pretty little state park (Oh yes, the campground has HOT showers). from Kodachrome Basin state park, we drove up to Bryce National Park. LOTS of snow, but beautiful on a sunny day (few other people). We ate at the Subway just outside Ruby Inn - then drove on to Rainbow Point, which at 9,100 feet, had plenty of snow (about three feet worth along the lookout path). Then we worked our way back out Bryce, stopping to photograph at each and every lookout point that had been plowed, enjoying Bryce as the sun dropped down low and the light changed by the minute. After Bryce we backtracked again and drove on to Escalante, Utah (one of my often visited and favorite “base camps”), where we had reserved rooms by phone at the rustic but friendly: Circle “D” motel (ask for Robert and tell him Oldmantravels with the old red Toyota pickup truck sent you). After checking in at the Circle “D”, we headed over to the Escalante Outfitters ( hiking supply, books, free internet use, excellent food, really friendly people cafe) - - for a big dinner a cold beer, pizza, and a “toast” to the best road trip day we had enjoyed thus far. We had LOTS of dirt road destinations in mind for day 11 of the road trip (the next day) BUT we were in for quite a surprise the next morning at Escalante. So like on all good road trips, you stay flexible, make the best of what comes your way, and go for it and that is exactly what we did. 0 3,875 MILE/12 DAY ~ 4 CORNERS ROAD TRIP OVERVIEW 0 At the start of year 2011, I made tentative plans to take a two week solo “road trip” through the Four Corners area (The Colorado Plateau), during the last half of March. Then, if my wife could get the time needed off from her part time job, I also planned a “road trip” vacation to the Southwest, in April with her. When I put the plan together for the March trip, I decided to see if an old friend of mine, Ed (Flickr’s: OldWrangler), might be interested in joining me. I volunteered to take my old four wheel drive pickup truck and split the gasoline expense with him. We would each get an inexpensive motel room on the road to serve as “base camps” to hike, photograph, and explore back roads in the Four Corners area. Not only did Ed accept but he also proposed that we take his brand new 4-door Jeep Wrangler instead of my old pickup truck. That didn’t take any thinking on my part. I LOVE Jeeps and Ed and I have always got along well (decades ago, I worked for him and we had taken a fun road trip together back in 2008, along with my friend John and my youngest son). The deal was sealed. We left my house i

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