GOLD FACIAL AT HOME - AT HOME

Gold facial at home - Rise of the nations gold edition.

Gold Facial At Home


gold facial at home
    at home
  • An informal party in a person's home
  • A period when a person has announced that they will receive visitors in their home
  • a reception held in your own home
  • at, to, or toward the place where you reside; "he worked at home"
  • on the home team's field; "they played at home last night"
    facial
  • A beauty treatment for the face
  • cranial nerve that supplies facial muscles
  • of or concerning the face; "a facial massage"; "facial hair"; "facial expression"
  • of or pertaining to the outside surface of an object
    gold
  • coins made of gold
  • made from or covered with gold; "gold coins"; "the gold dome of the Capitol"; "the golden calf"; "gilded icons"
  • amber: a deep yellow color; "an amber light illuminated the room"; "he admired the gold of her hair"
  • An alloy of this
  • A yellow precious metal, the chemical element of atomic number 79, valued esp. for use in jewelry and decoration, and to guarantee the value of currencies
  • A deep lustrous yellow or yellow-brown color
gold facial at home - Rejuvenique RJV10KIT
Rejuvenique RJV10KIT Facial Toning Mask Kit
Rejuvenique RJV10KIT Facial Toning Mask Kit
Set includes: rejuvenique mask adjustable, washable headband control handset cable connector 9 volt battery owner s manual

By delivering a light pulsation from a 9-volt battery (included), the 26 gold-plated contact points inside this facemask gradually tone the skin and reduce the appearance of wrinkling. The mask's control unit has a knob that adjusts the pulsation intensity to suit individual preference. Though the mask is made of hard plastic, you can adjust the headband and extend key contact points by rotating them so you can fit the mask to any face size, both male and female.
A booklet clearly explains how to use the mask, and a video is included for additional instruction. The basics, however, are easy to grasp. The 26 contact points cover 12 zones of the face. When it's turned on, the mask activates the contact points in a particular zone for about 20 seconds, and then proceeds though the other 11 zones one by one, repeating the sequence four times. A full treatment takes about 15 minutes, and you may apply two treatments each day. To ensure proper skin interaction, each contact point needs a dab of toning gel. Two ounces of gel are included, but you can purchase more separately, along with additional contact points if the originals wear down. The mask carries a one-year warranty against defects. --Fred Brack

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Galapagos Islands-262
Galapagos Islands-262
A Land Iguana posing on a rock on South Plaza Island. Land Iguana The Galapagos Land Iguana (Conolophus subcristatus) is a species of lizard in the Iguanidae family and is endemic to the Galapagos Islands, primarily the islands of Fernandina, Isabela, Santa Cruz, North Seymour, Hood and South Plaza. The Galapagos Land Iguana varies in morphology and coloration among different island populations. There are two taxonomically distinct forms of Conolophus inhabiting the western part of the islands (C. rosada and C. pallidus) and one in the central part (C. subcristatus). Its generic name, Conolophus, is derived from two Greek words: conos meaning "spiny" and lophos meaning "crest" or "plume", denoting the spiny crests along their backs. Its specific name subcristatus is derived from the Latin words sub meaning "lesser" and cristatus meaning "crested," and refers to the low crest of spines along the animal's back which is not as tall as in most iguanids. Charles Darwin described the Galapagos Land Iguana as "ugly animals, of a yellowish orange beneath, and of a brownish-red colour above: from their low facial angle they have a singularly stupid appearance." The Galapagos Land Iguana grows to a length of three to five feet with a body weight of up to twenty-five pounds, depending upon which island they are from. Being cold-blooded, they absorb heat from the sun by basking on volcanic rock, and at night sleep in burrows to conserve their body heat. These iguanas also enjoy a symbiotic relationship with birds; the birds remove parasites and ticks, providing relief to the iguanas and food for the birds. Land iguanas are primarily herbivorous; however, some individuals have shown that they are opportunistic carnivores supplementing their diet with insects, centipedes and carrion. Because fresh water is scarce on the islands it inhabits, the Galapagos Land Iguana obtains the majority of its moisture from the prickly-pear cactus that makes up 80% of its diet: fruit, flowers, pads, and even spines. During the rainy season it will drink from available standing pools of water and feast on yellow flowers of the genus Portulaca. It is estimated that the Galapagos Land Iguana has a 50 to 60-year lifespan. Galapagos Land Iguanas become sexually mature anywhere between eight and fifteen years of age, depending on which island they are from. Mating season also varies between islands, but soon after mating, the females migrate to sandy areas to nest, laying 2-25 eggs in a burrow 18 inches deep. The eggs hatch anywhere from 90 to 125 days later. On South Plaza Island, where the territories of Marine Iguanas and Land Iguanas overlap, the two sometimes interbreed, resulting in a mixture of features from each species; resulting in what is known as a Hybrid Iguana. The most likely unions tend to be between male Marine Iguanas and Female Land Iguanas. Despite their long separation time and their being two distinct species from different genera, the offspring are viable, although likely sterile. It is estimated that between 5,000 and 10,000 land iguanas are found in the Galapagos. These iguanas were so abundant on Santiago Island at one time that naturalist Charles Darwin remarked when it was called King James Island that "...when we were left at James, we could not for some time find a spot free from their burrows on which to pitch our single tent". In the years since then, entire populations (including all the animals on Santiago Island) have been wiped out by introduced feral animals such as pigs, rats, cats, and dogs. It has been suggested that a pink morph of the Galapagos population is actually a genetically distinct subpopulation. This would warrant a separate species designation for the pink subpopulation. Subsequent genetic analysis of the pink morphs have suggested that the subpopulation split off from the main C. subcristatus one at least five million years ago. Beginning in the early 1990s the Galapagos Land Iguana is the subject of an active re-introduction campaign on Baltra Island. These animals became extinct on Baltra by 1954, allegedly wiped out by soldiers stationed there who shot the iguanas for amusement. However, in the early 1930s, William Randolph Hearst had translocated a population of Land Iguanas from Baltra to North Seymour Island, a smaller island just a few hundred metres north of Baltra because he could not understand why no iguanas were present there. Hearst's translocated iguanas survived, and became the breeding stock for the Charles Darwin Research Station captive breeding program which has successfully reintroduced the species to Baltra and a number of other areas. Visitors today frequently see iguanas on both the runway of the Baltra airport or while they cross the road. South Plaza Island South Plaza is a small island off the east coast of Santa Cruz in the Galapagos Islands. It has an area of 0.13 km? and a maximum altitud
Galapagos Islands-296
Galapagos Islands-296
The Santa Fe subspecies of Land Iguana, on Santa Fe Island (funnily enough!) Land Iguana The Galapagos Land Iguana (Conolophus subcristatus) is a species of lizard in the Iguanidae family and is endemic to the Galapagos Islands, primarily the islands of Fernandina, Isabela, Santa Cruz, North Seymour, Hood and South Plaza. The Galapagos Land Iguana varies in morphology and coloration among different island populations. There are two taxonomically distinct forms of Conolophus inhabiting the western part of the islands (C. rosada and C. pallidus) and one in the central part (C. subcristatus). Its generic name, Conolophus, is derived from two Greek words: conos meaning "spiny" and lophos meaning "crest" or "plume", denoting the spiny crests along their backs. Its specific name subcristatus is derived from the Latin words sub meaning "lesser" and cristatus meaning "crested," and refers to the low crest of spines along the animal's back which is not as tall as in most iguanids. Charles Darwin described the Galapagos Land Iguana as "ugly animals, of a yellowish orange beneath, and of a brownish-red colour above: from their low facial angle they have a singularly stupid appearance." The Galapagos Land Iguana grows to a length of three to five feet with a body weight of up to twenty-five pounds, depending upon which island they are from. Being cold-blooded, they absorb heat from the sun by basking on volcanic rock, and at night sleep in burrows to conserve their body heat. These iguanas also enjoy a symbiotic relationship with birds; the birds remove parasites and ticks, providing relief to the iguanas and food for the birds. Land iguanas are primarily herbivorous; however, some individuals have shown that they are opportunistic carnivores supplementing their diet with insects, centipedes and carrion. Because fresh water is scarce on the islands it inhabits, the Galapagos Land Iguana obtains the majority of its moisture from the prickly-pear cactus that makes up 80% of its diet: fruit, flowers, pads, and even spines. During the rainy season it will drink from available standing pools of water and feast on yellow flowers of the genus Portulaca. It is estimated that the Galapagos Land Iguana has a 50 to 60-year lifespan. Galapagos Land Iguanas become sexually mature anywhere between eight and fifteen years of age, depending on which island they are from. Mating season also varies between islands, but soon after mating, the females migrate to sandy areas to nest, laying 2-25 eggs in a burrow 18 inches deep. The eggs hatch anywhere from 90 to 125 days later. On South Plaza Island, where the territories of Marine Iguanas and Land Iguanas overlap, the two sometimes interbreed, resulting in a mixture of features from each species; resulting in what is known as a Hybrid Iguana. The most likely unions tend to be between male Marine Iguanas and Female Land Iguanas. Despite their long separation time and their being two distinct species from different genera, the offspring are viable, although likely sterile. It is estimated that between 5,000 and 10,000 land iguanas are found in the Galapagos. These iguanas were so abundant on Santiago Island at one time that naturalist Charles Darwin remarked when it was called King James Island that "...when we were left at James, we could not for some time find a spot free from their burrows on which to pitch our single tent". In the years since then, entire populations (including all the animals on Santiago Island) have been wiped out by introduced feral animals such as pigs, rats, cats, and dogs. It has been suggested that a pink morph of the Galapagos population is actually a genetically distinct subpopulation. This would warrant a separate species designation for the pink subpopulation. Subsequent genetic analysis of the pink morphs have suggested that the subpopulation split off from the main C. subcristatus one at least five million years ago. Beginning in the early 1990s the Galapagos Land Iguana is the subject of an active re-introduction campaign on Baltra Island. These animals became extinct on Baltra by 1954, allegedly wiped out by soldiers stationed there who shot the iguanas for amusement. However, in the early 1930s, William Randolph Hearst had translocated a population of Land Iguanas from Baltra to North Seymour Island, a smaller island just a few hundred metres north of Baltra because he could not understand why no iguanas were present there. Hearst's translocated iguanas survived, and became the breeding stock for the Charles Darwin Research Station captive breeding program which has successfully reintroduced the species to Baltra and a number of other areas. Visitors today frequently see iguanas on both the runway of the Baltra airport or while they cross the road. Santa Fe Santa Fe Island, also called Barrington Island after admiral Samuel Barrington, is a small island of 24 km? which lies in th

gold facial at home
gold facial at home
Pretika SonicDermabrasion Facial Brush
SonicDermabrasion Facial Brush using Sonic High Frequency Micro-Pulsating Cleansing Technology

Go a step above your facial cleansing routine with the SonicDermabrasion Facial Brush. Featuring Micro-Pulsating Vibration Cleansing Technology, this Facial Brush gently exfoliates and cleanses your skin to better prepare it for absorption of skincare treatments. Designed for delicate, sensitive, and normal skin types, the Facial Brush improves the appearance and texture of your skin with a simple addition to your cleansing routine.
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SonicDermabrasion
Facial Brush
At a Glance:

Facial brush for exfoliating, cleansing, and smoothing skin
Two power settings for light exfoliation and deeper cleansing
Two (2) nonporous, bacteria-resistant microfiber bristle applicators, safe for all skin types
Includes charging cradle and built-in rechargeable battery
Water-resistant and cordless for use in the shower


callout

SonicDermabrasion Facial Brush


The low-powered "green light" setting for gentle exfoliation is suitable for sensitive skin. View larger.
SonicDermabrasion Facial Brush


Micro-Pulsating Vibration Cleansing Technology deeply cleanses and gently exfoliates your skin. View larger.


Safe, Effective Facial Brush for Daily Use

To help you achieve a healthier and more youthful appearance, the SonicDermabrasion Facial Brush gently removes your skin's outer layer of dry and flaky skin cells. This process may help reduce the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles, and large pores, resulting in smoother skin with an improved texture and a marked reduction in oily areas, dry-skin patches, and blemishes.

Gentle enough for daily use, the Facial Brush works with all skin types and has a replaceable microfiber head that is nonporous and bacteria resistant. The brush is also safe for use in the shower, thanks to its water-resistant, cordless design.

One-Step Exfoliation, Cleansing, and Smoothing

This easy-to-use Facial Brush offers cleansing and exfoliation in one step. The brush's Micro-Pulsating Vibration Cleansing Technology works with your skin's natural elasticity to deeply cleanse and gently exfoliate. Two cleansing and exfoliating speeds are offered: a low-powered "green light" speed for gentle exfoliation (suitable for delicate and sensitive skin) and a high-powered "red light" speed for more rigorous exfoliation and deeper cleansing.

The Facial Brush includes a timer that beeps after 20 seconds--the recommended treatment time for each area of the face (forehead, nose, chin, and cheeks). With the built-in timer, you'll never have to worry that you're working the skin too little or too much. For added convenience, the Facial Brush comes with a charging cradle and built-in rechargeable battery.

Works with Your Daily Skincare Routine

The penetrative technology of the Facial Brush works well with your daily beauty products--from cleansers and scrubs to micro-dermabrasion creams. Simply hydrate or dampen your face with warm water, dot the product on each area of your face, and apply the Facial Brush as directed.

What's in the Box

SonicDermabrasion Facial Brush, charging cradle (120 volts), two (2) microfiber bristle applicators, and a built-in rechargeable NiMh cell battery.

See also:
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current market price for gold
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gold miner se
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