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transport refrigeration parts
    refrigeration
  • deliberately lowering the body's temperature for therapeutic purposes; "refrigeration by immersing the patient's body in a cold bath"
  • the process of cooling or freezing (e.g., food) for preservative purposes
  • (refrigerant) any substance used to provide cooling (as in a refrigerator)
    transport
  • Take or carry (people or goods) from one place to another by means of a vehicle, aircraft, or ship
  • an exchange of molecules (and their kinetic energy and momentum) across the boundary between adjacent layers of a fluid or across cell membranes
  • Overwhelm (someone) with a strong emotion, esp. joy
  • conveyance: something that serves as a means of transportation
  • move something or somebody around; usually over long distances
  • Cause (someone) to feel that they are in another place or time
    parts
  • the local environment; "he hasn't been seen around these parts in years"
  • Cause to divide or move apart, leaving a central space
  • Divide to leave a central space
  • (part) something determined in relation to something that includes it; "he wanted to feel a part of something bigger than himself"; "I read a portion of the manuscript"; "the smaller component is hard to reach"; "the animal constituent of plankton"
  • (of two things) Move away from each other
  • (part) separate: go one's own way; move apart; "The friends separated after the party"
transport refrigeration parts - The 2011
The 2011 Import and Export Market for Industrial Refrigerators, Freezers, and Other Refrigeration and Freezing Equipment and Parts in Jordan
The 2011 Import and Export Market for Industrial Refrigerators, Freezers, and Other Refrigeration and Freezing Equipment and Parts in Jordan
On the demand side, exporters and strategic planners focusing on industrial refrigerators, freezers, and other refrigeration and freezing equipment and parts in Jordan face a number of questions. Which countries are supplying industrial refrigerators, freezers, and other refrigeration and freezing equipment and parts to Jordan? How important is Jordan compared to others in terms of the entire global and regional market? How much do the imports of industrial refrigerators, freezers, and other refrigeration and freezing equipment and parts vary from one country of origin to another in Jordan? On the supply side, Jordan also exports industrial refrigerators, freezers, and other refrigeration and freezing equipment and parts. Which countries receive the most exports from Jordan? How are these exports concentrated across buyers? What is the value of these exports and which countries are the largest buyers?

This report was created for strategic planners, international marketing executives and import/export managers who are concerned with the market for industrial refrigerators, freezers, and other refrigeration and freezing equipment and parts in Jordan. With the globalization of this market, managers can no longer be contented with a local view. Nor can managers be contented with out-of-date statistics which appear several years after the fact. I have developed a methodology, based on macroeconomic and trade models, to estimate the market for industrial refrigerators, freezers, and other refrigeration and freezing equipment and parts for those countries serving Jordan via exports, or supplying from Jordan via imports. It does so for the current year based on a variety of key historical indicators and econometric models.

In what follows, Chapter 2 begins by summarizing where Jordan fits into the world market for imported and exported industrial refrigerators, freezers, and other refrigeration and freezing equipment and parts. The total level of imports and exports on a worldwide basis, and those for Jordan in particular, is estimated using a model which aggregates across over 150 key country markets and projects these to the current year. From there, each country represents a percent of the world market. This market is served from a number of competitive countries of origin. Based on both demand- and supply-side dynamics, market shares by country of origin are then calculated across each country market destination. These shares lead to a volume of import and export values for each country and are aggregated to regional and world totals. In doing so, we are able to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of both the value of each market and the share that Jordan is likely to receive this year. From these figures, rankings are calculated to allow managers to prioritize Jordan compared to other major country markets. In this way, all the figures provided in this report are forecasts that can be combined with internal information sources for strategic planning purposes.

83% (12)
57 Gansenvoort Street (53-61 Gansenvoort Street)
57 Gansenvoort Street (53-61 Gansenvoort Street)
Meatpacking District, Manhattan Commercial Tenants New England Biscuit Works (1889); E[lmer]. S. Burnham & Co.1 E.S. Burnham Paclng Co., canned goods, druggist sundries (1889-1929); Holmes & Scott, produce (1889); C.D. Bos & Son, crackers/ship biscuits (1902); A. Bohrer & Co., fruit (1929-36); James Fancelli, produce (1929-50); Otto J. Stumpp, seeds (1929-42); Eastern Products Co.1 General Desserts Corp.1 Jersey Belle Food Products Co. (1933-36); William D'Angelo/ Willy's Express (1950); Schmidt's Motor Express (1950); Ronald T. Calvin, meat (1955); Plymouth Beef Co. (1955); Verona Packing, Inc. (1955); Temple Packing Co., meat (1955-70); Western Window Cleaning Co. (1955-59); A. Michaud Co., meat (1959); Edward Seh, Jr., meat (1959); Ben Squires, Inc. (1959); A.G. Savetz Co., meat/poultry (1950); National Purveyor Co., meat (1965); L&S Flanks, meat (1965); James E. Reardon, Inc. (1965); R. Friend & Co. (1970-86); Budget Movers (1970); West Allen Tarwater (1970); Rubin & Schoener, Inc. (1970-75); Knapp Meat Supply, Inc. (1975); Yama Seafood Co. (1980); Nishimaru, Inc. (1980); Slowik Meat Co. (1980); Rimi Packing Co. (1980); Hughie Wholesale Meats, Inc. (1980); Village Wholesale Meat Corp. (1986-93); Direct Market Transporting (1986); Sal DiFlore, meat (1993); Gotham Seafood Corp. (1993); Hell, club (1999-2003) History For nearly a century, from 1847 to 1942, this property belonged to the prominent Goelet family, which held extensive real estate in Manhattan, including 402-408 West 14th Street [see]. This parcel passed in 1849 from Peter Goelet (1800-1879) to Robert Goelet (1809-1879); in 1881 to Robert Goelet (1 841-1 899) and Ogden Goelet (1 846-1897) by partition deed; and, after their deaths, to Robert Walton Goelet (1880-1941) and Anne Marie Guestier Goelet. This building was constructed in 1887, at the time of the widening of Gansevoort Street. Its unusual shape, an acute triangle, comes from the odd plan of the lot. Architect Joseph M. Dunn executed a number of commissions for the Goelets during his career. Builder-contractor Michael Reid (c. 1832-191 8) later formed the M. Reid Co. which constructed the Ritz-Carlton Hotel, one of the Metropolitan Museum of Art additions, and eleven Carnegie libraries. Reid also built 823-829 Washington Street [see] in 1880. E.S. Burnham & Co.1 E.S. Burnham Packing Co., canned goods and, later, druggist sundries, remained in this location until around 1929. Elmer S. Burnham (c. 1854-1941), born in Michigan, began as a grain broker in Chicago prior to establishing his packing business. Among Burnham's products were clam chowder and clam bouillon. From 1905 to 1929, the E.S. Burnham Packing Co. operated a clam cannery on Marco Island, Florida. Painted signs still existing on this building advertise Burnham and other tenants. A painted sign at the upper portion of the western wall advertises "BURNHAM'S CLAM CHOWDER" superimposed with "BEET WINE." "NEW ENGLAND BISCUIT WORK" appears above the second story, and Burnham's "CLAM CHOWDER" and "CLAMBOUILLON" are painted above the fourth story, of the Gansevoort Street facade. Tenants in the 1920s-40s included A. Bohrer & Co., fruit; James Fancelli, produce, and Otto J. Stumpp, seeds. Many of the tenants after the mid-1950s were meatpackers. Photographer Berenice Abbott photographed this building as part of her work Changing New York in 1936. This imposing vernacular style building, which is largely intact, contributes to the historically-mixed architectural character and varied uses - including market-related functions - of the Gansevoort Market Historic District. Constructed in 1887, during one of the major phases of development of the area, when buildings were constructed for produce- and food-related businesses, the building further contributes to the visual cohesion of the district through its brick and stone facades, metal canopy, cast-iron storefronts, and the fact that it is one of seven buildings in the district designed by architect Joseph M. Dunn. ----About the district---- The Gansevoort Market Historic District - consisting of 104 buildings - is distinctive for its architectural character which reflects the area's long history of continuous, varied use as a place of dwelling, industry, and commerce, particularly as a marketplace, and its urban layout. The buildings, most dating from the 1840s through the 1940s, represent four major phases of development, and include both purpose-built structures, designed in then-fashionable styles, and those later adapted for market use. The architecture of the district tells the story of an important era in New York City's history when it became the financial center of the country and when its markets were expanding to serve the metropolitan region and beyond. Visual cohesion is provided to the streetscapes by the predominance of brick as a facade material; the one- to six-story
Arctic Ice Project Installation
Arctic Ice Project Installation
Ricky and George are installing the backup electricity for the refrigeration unit in case the solar panels fail. Installation shots of Tavares Strachan's The Distance Between What We Have and What We Want (Arctic Ice Project), 2004-08. --- Tavares Strachan (born Nassau, the Bahamas, 1979). The Distance Between What We Have and What We Want (Arctic Ice Project), 2004?8. Ice, refrigeration unit, solar panels, battery system. Lent by the artist, Pierogi 2000, and Ronald Feldman Fine Art. In 2005, Tavares Strachan journeyed to the Alaskan Arctic and worked with a skilled team to extract a single two-and-a-half ton piece of ice from a frozen river. This ice block was shipped to the Bahamas (the artist’s birthplace) and exhibited there in hot summer weather, kept cold in a specially designed freezer powered by solar energy. The very same block of ice and cooling system are now on view here in Brooklyn. The act of transporting refrigerated Arctic ice to his childhood home was in part a response to Strachan’s experience as a child, when he found the idea of landscapes of snow and ice almost impossible to comprehend. The work suggests the interdependency of two extremes, with the heat of the sun in a warm climate keeping an icy piece of the Arctic intact. At the same time, it alludes to a number of environmental and social issues, including the realities of climate change, our sense of what is valuable, and the immigrant’s experience of displacement. The path of the ice block— which went from the Bahamas to Miami and now to Brooklyn— parallels that of many new Americans of Caribbean origin.

transport refrigeration parts
transport refrigeration parts
The 2011 Import and Export Market for Industrial Refrigerators, Freezers, and Other Refrigeration and Freezing Equipment and Parts in the United States
On the demand side, exporters and strategic planners focusing on industrial refrigerators, freezers, and other refrigeration and freezing equipment and parts in the United States face a number of questions. Which countries are supplying industrial refrigerators, freezers, and other refrigeration and freezing equipment and parts to the United States? How important is the United States compared to others in terms of the entire global and regional market? How much do the imports of industrial refrigerators, freezers, and other refrigeration and freezing equipment and parts vary from one country of origin to another in the United States? On the supply side, the United States also exports industrial refrigerators, freezers, and other refrigeration and freezing equipment and parts. Which countries receive the most exports from the United States? How are these exports concentrated across buyers? What is the value of these exports and which countries are the largest buyers?

This report was created for strategic planners, international marketing executives and import/export managers who are concerned with the market for industrial refrigerators, freezers, and other refrigeration and freezing equipment and parts in the United States. With the globalization of this market, managers can no longer be contented with a local view. Nor can managers be contented with out-of-date statistics which appear several years after the fact. I have developed a methodology, based on macroeconomic and trade models, to estimate the market for industrial refrigerators, freezers, and other refrigeration and freezing equipment and parts for those countries serving the United States via exports, or supplying from the United States via imports. It does so for the current year based on a variety of key historical indicators and econometric models.

In what follows, Chapter 2 begins by summarizing where the United States fits into the world market for imported and exported industrial refrigerators, freezers, and other refrigeration and freezing equipment and parts. The total level of imports and exports on a worldwide basis, and those for the United States in particular, is estimated using a model which aggregates across over 150 key country markets and projects these to the current year. From there, each country represents a percent of the world market. This market is served from a number of competitive countries of origin. Based on both demand- and supply-side dynamics, market shares by country of origin are then calculated across each country market destination. These shares lead to a volume of import and export values for each country and are aggregated to regional and world totals. In doing so, we are able to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of both the value of each market and the share that the United States is likely to receive this year. From these figures, rankings are calculated to allow managers to prioritize the United States compared to other major country markets. In this way, all the figures provided in this report are forecasts that can be combined with internal information sources for strategic planning purposes.

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