8 INCH PNEUMATIC WHEELS : PNEUMATIC WHEELS

8 Inch Pneumatic Wheels : 5th Wheel Rv Parts : Dragster Steering Wheel.

8 Inch Pneumatic Wheels


8 inch pneumatic wheels
    pneumatic
  • An item of pneumatic equipment
  • (pneumatically) in a pneumatic manner; "at the present time the transmission is very often done hydraulically or pneumatically"
  • (pneumatics) the branch of mechanics that deals with the mechanical properties of gases
  • of or relating to or using air (or a similar gas); "pneumatic drill"; "pneumatic tire"
    wheels
  • (wheel) a simple machine consisting of a circular frame with spokes (or a solid disc) that can rotate on a shaft or axle (as in vehicles or other machines)
  • A circular object that revolves on an axle and forms part of a machine
  • A circular object that revolves on an axle and is fixed below a vehicle or other object to enable it to move easily over the ground
  • Used in reference to the cycle of a specified condition or set of events
  • (wheel) change directions as if revolving on a pivot; "They wheeled their horses around and left"
  • steering wheel: a handwheel that is used for steering
    inch
  • A unit of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 cm)
  • A very small amount or distance
  • A unit used to express other quantities, in particular
  • column inch: a unit of measurement for advertising space
  • a unit of length equal to one twelfth of a foot
  • edge: advance slowly, as if by inches; "He edged towards the car"
    8
  • eight: the cardinal number that is the sum of seven and one
  • Bookbinding is the process of physically assembling a book from a number of folded or unfolded sheets of paper or other material. It usually involves attaching covers to the resulting text-block.
  • eight: being one more than seven
8 inch pneumatic wheels - E.R. Wagner
E.R. Wagner 4FN8 6" Diameter Fully Pneumatic Soft Tread/Steel Hub Wheel Swivel Plate Caster with Total Lock Brake, 3-3/4" Length X 2-3/4" Width Plate, 200 lbs Capacity Range
E.R. Wagner 4FN8 6" Diameter Fully Pneumatic Soft Tread/Steel Hub Wheel Swivel Plate Caster with Total Lock Brake, 3-3/4" Length X 2-3/4" Width Plate, 200 lbs Capacity Range
E.R. Wagner Casters & Wheels manufactures the highest quality products for a broad range of applications and markets, including industrial, commercial, institutional, food service, health care, and other specialized areas. We do more than manufacture quality casters, wheels, and accessories; we develop ways to make them last longer and perform better. Our engineers employ the latest design and engineering technology to remain at the forefront of our industry. Most metal stamping, forming, and product assembly is performed in house to ensure exacting quality standards are met. Further, our casters and wheels meet guidelines established by the Institute of Caster and Wheel Manufacturers (ICWM) and are NSF certified where applicable. The E.R. Wagner Casters & Wheels difference is marked by a 48-year tradition of incredibly high standards, exceptional quality, knowledgeable staff, and on-time delivery. We endeavor to do more than satisfy; we are driven to exceed expectations.

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M5 3 inch gun on M6 carriage, gun plate actually says #45 from 1942 Rock Island Arsenal 3 inch gun M9
M5 3 inch gun on M6 carriage, gun plate actually says #45 from 1942 Rock Island Arsenal 3 inch gun M9
M5 - 3 inch Anti-Tank Gun 3 inch Gun M5 was an anti-tank gun developed in the United States during World War II. The gun combined a 3-inch (76.2 mm) barrel of the anti-aircraft gun T9 and elements of the 105 mm howitzer M2. The M5 was issued exclusively to the US Army tank destroyer battalions starting in 1943. It saw combat in the Italian Campaign and in the Northwest Europe. While the M5 outperformed earlier anti-tank guns in the US service, its effective employment was hindered by its heavy weight and ammunition related issues. Losses suffered by towed TD battalions in the Battle of the Bulge and the existence of more mobile, better protected alternative in form of self-propelled tank destroyers led to gradual removal of the M5 from frontline service in 1945. Development and production history In 1940, the US Army just started to receive its first antitank gun, the 37 mm Gun M3. While it fitted the request of the Infantry for light, easy to manhandle anti-tank weapon, Artillery and Ordnance foresaw a need for a more powerful gun. This led to a number of expedient designs, such as adaptations of the 75 mm M1897 or towed variants of the 75 mm M3.[1] Late in 1940 the Ordnance Corps started another project - an anti-tank gun based on the 3 inch anti-aircraft gun T9. The barrel of the T9 was combined with breech, recoil system and carriage, all adapted from the 105 mm howitzer M2.[2] The pilot of the weapon, named 3 inch Gun T10, was ready by September 1941. Although the subsequent testing revealed minor problems, it was clear that the gun, eventually standardized as M5 on carriage M1, presents major performance improvement over existing designs.[3] Production began in December 1942. In November 1943 a slightly modified carriage was standardized as M6. In this carriage a flat shield borrowed from the 105 mm howitzer was replaced by a new sloped one. In January 1944 AGF requested to upgrade the guns built with the early carriage M1 to carriage M6; consequently most of the guns that reached the frontline had the M6 carriage.[4] Production of M5 Pieces 1942 built 250; 1943 built 1250; 1944 built 1500 for a total of 2500 pieces built Description As stated above, the barrel was adapted from the 3 inch Gun T9; it had rifling with uniform right hand twist, with 28 grooves and one turn in 25 calibers. It was combined with breech, recoil system and carriage from the 105 mm Howitzer M2. The breech was of horizontal sliding type, manual; the recoil system hydropneumatic. The carriage was of split trail type, equipped with a single equilibrator spring beneath the breech and wheels with pneumatic tires.[6] Organization Despite the performance advantages, it turned out that no branch of the US Army wanted the new gun. The Infantry considered it too large and heavy. The other possible user, the Tank Destroyer Center, preferred more mobile self-propelled weapons. Finally, a pressure from the head of Army Ground Forces, Gen. Lesley McNair, resulted in the gun being adopted by the TD Center. McNair's opinion was apparently influenced by the experience of the North African Campaign, where self-propelled guns were found to be hard to conceal.[7] On 31 March 1943 AGF ordered to convert fifteen self-propelled tank destroyer battalions to a towed form; eventually AGF decided that half of TD battalions should be towed. A towed TD battalion possessed 36 pieces, in three companies of 12.[8] M3 Halftracks were issued as prime movers. The organization from 1 September 1944 authorized M39 Armored Utility Vehicle instead, but these only reached frontline in spring 1945.[9] Those towed tank destroyer battalions were attached to US Army division to improve their anti-tank capabilities. Most often, a complete battalion was attached to an infantry division. In some cases towed TD battalions were attached to armored or airborne divisions; sometimes companies of the same battalion were given to different divisions; and sometimes a single division had several TD battalions - including a mix between towed and self-propelled - at once.[10] Combat service In October 1943 the first towed battalion - the 805th TD - arrived in Italy. Subsequently the M5 saw combat in the Italian Campaign and in the Northwest Europe.[11]One of the most notable engagements came during the German counterattack on Mortain in August 1944. The 823rd TD, attached to the 30th Infantry Division, played a key role in the successful defence of Saint Barthelemy, destroying fourteen tanks and a number of other vehicles, though at the price of losing eleven of its guns.[12] In addition to the anti-tank role, the gun was often used to supplement divisional field artillery[13] or to provide direct fire against enemy fortifications (e.g. a combat report from the 614th TD mentioned a two-gun section firing 143 shells at enemy post, achieving 139 hits[14]). Although the M5 easily outperformed older anti-tank guns in the US service, it was large and heavy - making it har
M5 3 inch gun #818 from 1943 on M6 Carriage, Pullman-Standard
M5 3 inch gun #818 from 1943 on M6 Carriage, Pullman-Standard
M5 - 3 inch Anti-Tank Gun 3 inch Gun M5 was an anti-tank gun developed in the United States during World War II. The gun combined a 3-inch (76.2 mm) barrel of the anti-aircraft gun T9 and elements of the 105 mm howitzer M2. The M5 was issued exclusively to the US Army tank destroyer battalions starting in 1943. It saw combat in the Italian Campaign and in the Northwest Europe. While the M5 outperformed earlier anti-tank guns in the US service, its effective employment was hindered by its heavy weight and ammunition related issues. Losses suffered by towed TD battalions in the Battle of the Bulge and the existence of more mobile, better protected alternative in form of self-propelled tank destroyers led to gradual removal of the M5 from frontline service in 1945. Development and production history In 1940, the US Army just started to receive its first antitank gun, the 37 mm Gun M3. While it fitted the request of the Infantry for light, easy to manhandle anti-tank weapon, Artillery and Ordnance foresaw a need for a more powerful gun. This led to a number of expedient designs, such as adaptations of the 75 mm M1897 or towed variants of the 75 mm M3.[1] Late in 1940 the Ordnance Corps started another project - an anti-tank gun based on the 3 inch anti-aircraft gun T9. The barrel of the T9 was combined with breech, recoil system and carriage, all adapted from the 105 mm howitzer M2.[2] The pilot of the weapon, named 3 inch Gun T10, was ready by September 1941. Although the subsequent testing revealed minor problems, it was clear that the gun, eventually standardized as M5 on carriage M1, presents major performance improvement over existing designs.[3] Production began in December 1942. In November 1943 a slightly modified carriage was standardized as M6. In this carriage a flat shield borrowed from the 105 mm howitzer was replaced by a new sloped one. In January 1944 AGF requested to upgrade the guns built with the early carriage M1 to carriage M6; consequently most of the guns that reached the frontline had the M6 carriage.[4] Production of M5 Pieces 1942 built 250; 1943 built 1250; 1944 built 1500 for a total of 2500 pieces built Description As stated above, the barrel was adapted from the 3 inch Gun T9; it had rifling with uniform right hand twist, with 28 grooves and one turn in 25 calibers. It was combined with breech, recoil system and carriage from the 105 mm Howitzer M2. The breech was of horizontal sliding type, manual; the recoil system hydropneumatic. The carriage was of split trail type, equipped with a single equilibrator spring beneath the breech and wheels with pneumatic tires.[6] Organization Despite the performance advantages, it turned out that no branch of the US Army wanted the new gun. The Infantry considered it too large and heavy. The other possible user, the Tank Destroyer Center, preferred more mobile self-propelled weapons. Finally, a pressure from the head of Army Ground Forces, Gen. Lesley McNair, resulted in the gun being adopted by the TD Center. McNair's opinion was apparently influenced by the experience of the North African Campaign, where self-propelled guns were found to be hard to conceal.[7] On 31 March 1943 AGF ordered to convert fifteen self-propelled tank destroyer battalions to a towed form; eventually AGF decided that half of TD battalions should be towed. A towed TD battalion possessed 36 pieces, in three companies of 12.[8] M3 Halftracks were issued as prime movers. The organization from 1 September 1944 authorized M39 Armored Utility Vehicle instead, but these only reached frontline in spring 1945.[9] Those towed tank destroyer battalions were attached to US Army division to improve their anti-tank capabilities. Most often, a complete battalion was attached to an infantry division. In some cases towed TD battalions were attached to armored or airborne divisions; sometimes companies of the same battalion were given to different divisions; and sometimes a single division had several TD battalions - including a mix between towed and self-propelled - at once.[10] Combat service In October 1943 the first towed battalion - the 805th TD - arrived in Italy. Subsequently the M5 saw combat in the Italian Campaign and in the Northwest Europe.[11]One of the most notable engagements came during the German counterattack on Mortain in August 1944. The 823rd TD, attached to the 30th Infantry Division, played a key role in the successful defence of Saint Barthelemy, destroying fourteen tanks and a number of other vehicles, though at the price of losing eleven of its guns.[12] In addition to the anti-tank role, the gun was often used to supplement divisional field artillery[13] or to provide direct fire against enemy fortifications (e.g. a combat report from the 614th TD mentioned a two-gun section firing 143 shells at enemy post, achieving 139 hits[14]). Although the M5 easily outperformed older anti-tank guns in the US service, it was large and heavy - making it hard

8 inch pneumatic wheels
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