BENEFIT COSMETICS EMPLOYMENT. BENEFIT COSMETICS

BENEFIT COSMETICS EMPLOYMENT. TURN AROUND AND MAKE UP.

Benefit Cosmetics Employment


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    employment
  • the occupation for which you are paid; "he is looking for employment"; "a lot of people are out of work"
  • the act of giving someone a job
  • the state of being employed or having a job; "they are looking for employment"; "he was in the employ of the city"
  • The condition of having paid work
  • A person's trade or profession
  • The action of giving work to someone
    cosmetics
  • A product applied to the body, esp. the face, to improve its appearance
  • Cosmetics are substances used to enhance the appearance or odor of the human body. Cosmetics include skin-care creams, lotions, powders, perfumes, lipsticks, fingernail and toe nail polish, eye and facial makeup, permanent waves, colored contact lenses, hair colors, hair sprays and gels,
  • (cosmetic) a toiletry designed to beautify the body
  • (cosmetic) serving an esthetic rather than a useful purpose; "cosmetic fenders on cars"; "the buildings were utilitarian rather than decorative"
    benefit
  • be beneficial for; "This will do you good"
  • An advantage or profit gained from something
  • A public performance or other entertainment of which the proceeds go to a particular charitable cause
  • financial assistance in time of need
  • profit: derive a benefit from; "She profited from his vast experience"
  • A payment or gift made by an employer, the state, or an insurance company

Ernest Flagg's Todt Hill Cottages: McCall's Demonstration House
Ernest Flagg's Todt Hill Cottages: McCall's Demonstration House
Grant City, Staten Island, New York City, New York Stone Court, the country estate of the noted American architect Ernest Flagg, is located on Todt Hill, part of the central ridge of serpentine rock which bisects the northern half of Staten Island. Flagg's imposing Colonial Revival style residence, several outbuildings and the nearby stone cottages he constructed on the grounds of his estate form a harmonious ensemble which exemplifies the architect's distinctive interpretation of Beaux-Arts inspired design principles as well as his life-long commitment to building reform. Born in Brooklyn in 1857, Flagg was a member of the first generation of American architects shaped by the rigorous training programs of the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris. Returning to this country in the 1880s and 1890s, Flagg and his contemporaries were imbued with an awareness of an architectural beauty governed by the constant principles of correct design discovered by the ancients and recovered by the architects of the Renaissance. Flagg's career, initiated by his competition-winning design of 1892 for St. Luke's Hospital on Morningside Heights, has been characterized as one which embraced seemingly disparate projects ranging from imposing residences for affluent clients and large institutional complexes to workers' housing. These were but the outward manifestations of an architectural sensibility which sought always to mediate the general polarities implied by the terms "art" and "science." Flagg noted, for instance, that the entire design of St. Luke's Hospital, from its plan to the placement of ornamental elements, was determined by his employment of a modular unit of measure, a methodology inspired by his analysis of Greek architecture and repeated in his subsequent designs such as those for the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. (1894-1898) and the Naval Academy at Annapolis (1897-1899). Flagg also recorded that, "Even for tenements it has worked well and plans for several large groups of model fireproof tenements (N.Y. Fireproof Model Tenements, 1899-1900) were made this way." Flagg was introduced to Staten Island by its first Borough President George Cromwell and in 1898 Flagg purchased a lot adjacent to Cromwell's Todt Hill property. Fronting on Prospect Place (today's Flagg Place), it offered spectacular views of the Lower New York Bay and the Atlantic Highlands. Set upon a large terrace defined by rubblestone walls and occupying the most elevated portion of his property, Flagg's residence was a substantial structure of whitewashed fieldstone and shingles. The construction material and the gambrel roof alluded to the local Colonial building tradition which Flagg defined as French Huguenot. Numerous permutations of the colonial tradition were introduced by Flagg; they include a vastly enlarged scale, massive chimneys rising above the eaves on the front and rear elevations, and a circular balustraded observation deck which, straddling the roof ridge and enframed by the chimneys, marked the central axis bisecting the house and its grounds. Subsequent additions to the residence, the siting of outbuildings and the design of the landscape were all undertaken in reference to this axis. In addition to demonstrating Flagg's individualized Beaux-Arts-derived aesthetic, the estate also reveals, from its inception, the architect's interest in building technology. The chimneys, for example, are topped by distinctive curved ventilator caps which were painted black; intended to improve the efficiency of the heating system, the curved ventilator cap became one of the hallmarks of his Todt Hill designs. Continuing change, constant elaboration and ongoing experimentation are intrinsic to the history of Flagg's Todt Hill estate; the series of small stone cottages he constructed beginning in 1916 may in some respects be regarded as the culmination of the building program initiated in 1898. As a young man Flagg had been involved in land and building speculation with his father and brother in the 1870s and 1880s. It was an experience which surely played a formative role in shaping Flagg's visionary development scheme for his Staten Island properties. Just after the turn of the century Flagg began buying additional tracts of land on Todt Hill. By 1907 he had acquired approximately 70 acres in the vicinity of his original purchase and in 1909 he established the Flagg Estate Company. The total of 200 acres Flagg owned by 1918 extended southwestward from West Entry Road to the far side of Todt Hill Road where his extensive holdings included much of what is today the Richmond County Country Club golf course. Concurrently, Flagg was also involved in a number of projects entailing additions to his residence and its immediate grounds. The residence gained added grandeur with the construction of a wing on the southwestern side which balanced the earlier wing opposite. A second level was added to
Ernest Flagg's Todt Hill Cottages: Bowcot
Ernest Flagg's Todt Hill Cottages: Bowcot
Staten Island Completed in 1918, Bowcot is the first of several small stone cottages built by Ernest Flagg on the grounds of his Todt Hill estate. Employing the architect's inventive cost-saving design and construction techniques, Bowcot demonstrates Flagg's conviction that economy and good design are not mutually exclusive. Flagg's Todt Hill cottages embody his pioneering vision of affordable middle-class housing which could fulfill the aspirations of a broad segment of the nation's population. Ernest Flagg's Todt Hill Estate Stone Court, the country estate of the noted American architect Ernest Flagg, is located on Todt Hill, part of the central ridge of serpentine rock which bisects the northern half of Staten Island. Flagg's imposing Colonial Revival style residence, several outbuildings and the nearby stone cottages he constructed on the grounds of his estate form a harmonious ensemble which exemplifies the architect's distinctive interpretation of Beaux-Arts inspired design principles as well as his life-long commitment to building reform. Born in Brooklyn in 1857, Flagg was a member of the first generation of American architects shaped by the rigorous training programs of the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris. Returning to this country in the 1880s and 1890s, Flagg and his contemporaries were imbued with an awareness of an architectural beauty governed by the constant principles of correct design discovered by the ancients and recovered by the architects of the Renaissance. Flagg's career, initiated by his competition-winning design of 1892 for St. Luke's Hospital on Morningside Heights, has been characterized as one which embraced seemingly disparate projects ranging from imposing residences for affluent clients and large institutional complexes to workers' housing. These were but the outward manifestations of an architectural sensibility which sought always to mediate the general polarities implied by the terms "art" and "science." Flagg noted, for instance, that the entire design of St. Luke's Hospital, from its plan to the placement of ornamental elements, was determined by his employment of a modular unit of measure, a methodology inspired by his analysis of Greek architecture and repeated in his subsequent designs such as those for the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. (1894-1893) and the Naval Academy at Annapolis (1397-1899). Flagg also recorded that, "Even for tenements it has worked well and plans for several large groups of model fireproof tenements {N.Y. Fireproof Model Tenements, 1899-1900) were made this way." Flagg was introduced to Staten Island by its first Borough President George Cromwell and in 1898 Flagg purchased a lot adjacent to Cromwell's Todt Hill property. Fronting on Prospect Place (today's Flagg Place), it offered spectacular views of the Lower New York Bay and the Atlantic Highlands. Set upon a large terrace defined by rubblestone walls and occupying the most elevated portion of his property, Flagg's residence was a substantial structure of whitewashed fieldstone and shingles. The construction material and the gambrel roof alluded to the local Colonial building tradition which Flagg defined as French Huguenot. Numerous permutations of the colonial tradition were introduced by Flagg; they include a vastly enlarged scale, massive chimneys rising above the eaves on the front and rear elevations, and a circular balustraded observation deck which, straddling the roof ridge and enframed by the chimneys, marked the central axis bisecting the house and its grounds. Subsequent additions to the residence, the siting of outbuildings and the design of the landscape were all undertaken in reference to this axis. In addition to demonstrating Flagg's individualized Beaux-Arts-derived aesthetic, the estate also reveals, from its inception, the architect's interest in building technology. The chimneys, for example, are topped by distinctive curved ventilator caps which were painted black; intended to improve the efficiency of the heating system, the curved ventilator cap became one of the hallmarks of his Todt Hill designs. Continuing change, constant elaboration and ongoing experimentation are intrinsic to the history of Flagg's Todt Hill estate; the series of small stone cottages he constructed beginning in 1916 may in some respects be regarded as the culmination of the building program initiated in 1898. As a young man Flagg had been involved in land and building speculation with his father and brother in the 1870s and 1880s. It was an experience which surely played a formative role in shaping Flagg's visionary development scheme for his Staten Island properties. Just after the turn of the century Flagg began buying additional tracts of land on Todt Hill. By 1907 he had acquired approximately 70 acres in the vicinity of his original purchase and in 1909 he established the Flagg Estate Company. The total of 200 acres Flagg owned

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