QUICK WAY TO LOOSE WEIGHT FAST - LOOSE WEIGHT FAST

Quick way to loose weight fast - Snacks under 100 calories.

Quick Way To Loose Weight Fast


quick way to loose weight fast
    weight
  • burden: weight down with a load
  • the vertical force exerted by a mass as a result of gravity
  • A body's relative mass or the quantity of matter contained by it, giving rise to a downward force; the heaviness of a person or thing
  • The force exerted on the mass of a body by a gravitational field
  • slant: present with a bias; "He biased his presentation so as to please the share holders"
  • The quality of being heavy
    quick
  • accomplished rapidly and without delay; "was quick to make friends"; "his quick reaction prevented an accident"; "hoped for a speedy resolution of the problem"; "a speedy recovery"; "he has a right to a speedy trial"
  • promptly: with little or no delay; "the rescue squad arrived promptly"; "come here, quick!"
  • At a fast rate; quickly
  • any area of the body that is highly sensitive to pain (as the flesh underneath the skin or a fingernail or toenail)
    loose
  • Set free; release
  • Untie; unfasten
  • Relax (one's grip)
  • free: grant freedom to; free from confinement
  • not compact or dense in structure or arrangement; "loose gravel"
  • without restraint; "cows in India are running loose"
    fast
  • Abstain from all or some kinds of food or drink, esp. as a religious observance
  • abstaining from food
  • abstain from certain foods, as for religious or medical reasons; "Catholics sometimes fast during Lent"
  • acting or moving or capable of acting or moving quickly; "fast film"; "on the fast track in school"; "set a fast pace"; "a fast car"

Angel's Crest, 5.10c, Squamish - Long Way Down
Angel's Crest, 5.10c, Squamish - Long Way Down
This past Monday, I had the pleasure of climbing a classic line up the Stawamus Chief, in Squamish, British Columbia. “Angel’s Crest” has been on my agenda for as long as I can remember, but has eluded me for years. When a message came through from a good friend last week asking if I wanted to do it, I obviously jumped at the opportunity. After an early morning wake up call to hit the road I was tearing north for departure bay to catch a 6:20am ferry. After a seemingly endless boat ride, I met Dan, we ripped up the sea to sky highway, and arrived in Squamish at just before 9, and after a quick stop at the grocer to grab some food for the adventure, we were hiking up what we thought was the trail to the route. It turns out we were a rather long way off. A few cuts and a lot of bushwhacking later, we arrived at our destination. A short low 5th scramble (first pitch) took us to the base of the route proper. We encountered a party just in the process of tying in, wished them luck, and prepared our journey. After a bit of discussion, I took the rack and led the first pitch. It was not much more than a tree climb and a 5.5 dihedral up to a massive ledge and a natural belay (Natural tree belays are common on this route). I brought Dan up and started feeling pretty good about at being on the route at last! Dan took the rack and headed into the 3rd pitch, the famed Angel’s Crack. A glorious left trending 5.10a finger crack with a tricky crux. He took a small whipper when his feet blew out on some bad footholds, but other than that it went well. I followed and cleaned the pitch smoothly. By now we had our groove on… The next pitch was the lower crux, a 5.10b/c face climb with good protection and two bolts. It is notorious for occasionally being a wee bit wet. I led it smoothly, taking caution to avoid the wet spots until I ultimately topped out on a small ledge, set a gear belay on a couple C3’s and a small nut, weighted the system, hung out (enjoying the view) and brought up Dan. What followed was an easy low 5th pitch, followed by another 5.10, and all around flowy climbing. Somewhere in here we made it to a stellar tree’d ledge, snacked upon some food, and gauged that while we were not moving as fast as we had hoped, we were still well on track to finish without a dreaded bail-out into the North Gully. A tricky couple 5.9/10 bits brought us up to the forest ledge and a 3rd/4th class scramble up to the most exciting part of the climb. The final four pitches lay in front of us in all their incredible glory, starting with the aptly named Acrophobes, a series of hyper exposed spires with a drop to the bottom of the chief on one side, and a just as exciting drop to the north gully on the other. Dan was up to lead, and so took on this bit, which was a bit run out, but astonishingly fun 5.7 climbing. It was a sheer joy to travel through here, it really gives on the “on the edge of the abyss” feeling! Time was now growing short, and we did not wish to climb in the dark. We scampered down a short rappel, and up a very loose and mega exposed 5.8 bit which led to a tiny ledge and another tree belay. What followed was a spectacular, exposed 5.7 with a long slabby runout to finish and at a belay off of a tiny tree on the smallest of ledges, hundreds of meteres off the ground. This was the spot where I would belay Dan from as he took the rack and led the spectacular upper crux crack (5.10b). Hanging out here was absolutely spectacular! The world dropped beneath my feet! Time was beginning to be of the essence, so Dan wasted no time in heading up. Just as he was taking off, a member of the party of two British blokes behind us appeared over the edge. They had been climbing fast and had now caught up to us. We enjoyed climber banter and commented on the sheer spectacular awesomeness of the position we found ourselves in at that moment. Absolutely amazing! I had two pitches left, it was time to smile, relax, and take it all in. I have waited for this for YEARS! And here I was. Dan yelled from above that he was safe, I took him off belay. He took up the rope. “That’s me!” “On Belay!” “Climbing!” “Climb on!” …and with that, I was off. The last crux, and second to last pitch was amazing. It consists of a spectacular handcrack / layback which takes you through a couple small roofs and a spectacular face up to a huge block and the belay for the final pitch. After a quick changeover, I put Dan on belay and he made his way up. Well, before he made his way up, he crawled along a 5m long, 1m wide, and about 40cm high ledge/tunnel deal. To the left was the cliff, to the right was the abyss, straight ahead at the end of this bit, was the chimney that we ascend to the finish. After some sleuthing, Dan found his first piece, and made his way up. Five minutes later I heard a joyous scream. No problem understanding that one. Dan had just completed Angel’s Crest! My turn, I bid adieu to my British comrade, who by this point had caught up again
Angel's Crest, 5.10c, Squamish - On the Acrophobes-1
Angel's Crest, 5.10c, Squamish - On the Acrophobes-1
The Acrophobes! This past Monday, I had the pleasure of climbing a classic line up the Stawamus Chief, in Squamish, British Columbia. “Angel’s Crest” has been on my agenda for as long as I can remember, but has eluded me for years. When a message came through from a good friend last week asking if I wanted to do it, I obviously jumped at the opportunity. After an early morning wake up call to hit the road I was tearing north for departure bay to catch a 6:20am ferry. After a seemingly endless boat ride, I met Dan, we ripped up the sea to sky highway, and arrived in Squamish at just before 9, and after a quick stop at the grocer to grab some food for the adventure, we were hiking up what we thought was the trail to the route. It turns out we were a rather long way off. A few cuts and a lot of bushwhacking later, we arrived at our destination. A short low 5th scramble (first pitch) took us to the base of the route proper. We encountered a party just in the process of tying in, wished them luck, and prepared our journey. After a bit of discussion, I took the rack and led the first pitch. It was not much more than a tree climb and a 5.5 dihedral up to a massive ledge and a natural belay (Natural tree belays are common on this route). I brought Dan up and started feeling pretty good about at being on the route at last! Dan took the rack and headed into the 3rd pitch, the famed Angel’s Crack. A glorious left trending 5.10a finger crack with a tricky crux. He took a small whipper when his feet blew out on some bad footholds, but other than that it went well. I followed and cleaned the pitch smoothly. By now we had our groove on… The next pitch was the lower crux, a 5.10b/c face climb with good protection and two bolts. It is notorious for occasionally being a wee bit wet. I led it smoothly, taking caution to avoid the wet spots until I ultimately topped out on a small ledge, set a gear belay on a couple C3’s and a small nut, weighted the system, hung out (enjoying the view) and brought up Dan. What followed was an easy low 5th pitch, followed by another 5.10, and all around flowy climbing. Somewhere in here we made it to a stellar tree’d ledge, snacked upon some food, and gauged that while we were not moving as fast as we had hoped, we were still well on track to finish without a dreaded bail-out into the North Gully. A tricky couple 5.9/10 bits brought us up to the forest ledge and a 3rd/4th class scramble up to the most exciting part of the climb. The final four pitches lay in front of us in all their incredible glory, starting with the aptly named Acrophobes, a series of hyper exposed spires with a drop to the bottom of the chief on one side, and a just as exciting drop to the north gully on the other. Dan was up to lead, and so took on this bit, which was a bit run out, but astonishingly fun 5.7 climbing. It was a sheer joy to travel through here, it really gives on the “on the edge of the abyss” feeling! Time was now growing short, and we did not wish to climb in the dark. We scampered down a short rappel, and up a very loose and mega exposed 5.8 bit which led to a tiny ledge and another tree belay. What followed was a spectacular, exposed 5.7 with a long slabby runout to finish and at a belay off of a tiny tree on the smallest of ledges, hundreds of meteres off the ground. This was the spot where I would belay Dan from as he took the rack and led the spectacular upper crux crack (5.10b). Hanging out here was absolutely spectacular! The world dropped beneath my feet! Time was beginning to be of the essence, so Dan wasted no time in heading up. Just as he was taking off, a member of the party of two British blokes behind us appeared over the edge. They had been climbing fast and had now caught up to us. We enjoyed climber banter and commented on the sheer spectacular awesomeness of the position we found ourselves in at that moment. Absolutely amazing! I had two pitches left, it was time to smile, relax, and take it all in. I have waited for this for YEARS! And here I was. Dan yelled from above that he was safe, I took him off belay. He took up the rope. “That’s me!” “On Belay!” “Climbing!” “Climb on!” …and with that, I was off. The last crux, and second to last pitch was amazing. It consists of a spectacular handcrack / layback which takes you through a couple small roofs and a spectacular face up to a huge block and the belay for the final pitch. After a quick changeover, I put Dan on belay and he made his way up. Well, before he made his way up, he crawled along a 5m long, 1m wide, and about 40cm high ledge/tunnel deal. To the left was the cliff, to the right was the abyss, straight ahead at the end of this bit, was the chimney that we ascend to the finish. After some sleuthing, Dan found his first piece, and made his way up. Five minutes later I heard a joyous scream. No problem understanding that one. Dan had just completed Angel’s Crest! My turn, I bid adieu to my British comrade, who by this point ha

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