WINDOW COVERING COMPANY - WINDOW COVERING

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Window Covering Company


window covering company
    window covering
  • Window coverings are material used to cover a window to manage sunlight, to provide additional weatherproofing, to ensure privacy or for purely decorative purposes.
  • a device that is pulled down to shut out the light from a window
  • any decorative application to a window frame or pane of glass including blinds , cornices , draperies , window film , etc.
    company
  • an institution created to conduct business; "he only invests in large well-established companies"; "he started the company in his garage"
  • be a companion to somebody
  • Associate with; keep company with
  • small military unit; usually two or three platoons
  • Accompany (someone)
window covering company - Complete Sketchbook
Complete Sketchbook of Window Coverings
Complete Sketchbook of Window Coverings
This bumper book, crammed full of design ideas for curtains, drapes, blinds, bed treatments and other soft furnishings, works well as a quick reference book for decorators and curtain makers. Wendy has selected many of the most popular designs from her Sketchbooks plus some very new exciting ideas and produced one complete reference book of designs for window treatments. The book is divided into 7 colour co-ordinated sections and each of these will be easy to find by means of content tabs. Basic information such as various window shapes and quick measuring guides is included as well as essential illustrated information for choosing a design for a particular window shape. Contents include: Fabric characteristics and how to avoid certain pitfalls Catalogue of poles (hardware) and passementerie Curtain designs Blinds design ideas Bed Canopies and Coronas treatments Collection of other soft furnishings such as cushions, table coverings and lamps etc. Accessories to complete the project

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Brooklyn Trust Company (now Chemical Bank) Building
Brooklyn Trust Company (now Chemical Bank) Building
Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States The Brooklyn Trust Company building (now a branch of Chemical Bank), designed by the prominent firm of York & Sawyer, a talented, prolific, and versatile team, was constructed in 1913-16 in a style modeled after the palazzi of the sixteenth-century Italian High Renaissance. The building, gracefully adapted to the imagery and functions of American banking in the early twentieth century, continues to project an image of tradition, stability, and security. Although relatively small, the building is monumentally scaled and beautifully proportioned, executed in fine materials by superb craftsmen. Located near Brooklyn Borough Hall (originally City Hall) and at the edge of Brooklyn Heights, this is the finest of the buildings on the Montague Street block known as "Bank Row." The Brooklyn Trust Company played an important historic role in Brooklyn, from its founding during the aftermath of the Civil War until its consolidation with larger banks beginning in the mid-twentieth century. Its founders, subsequent trustees, and administrators were notable Brooklynites, committed not only to fiduciary but also to community responsibility. Today, the largely-intact building is a reminder of the importance of the institution in the Brooklyn community. Alterations have been minimal and have been carried out with respect for the original fabric and design. Description This very handsome neo-Italian Renaissance style building projects an image of stability, pride, and tradition — all appropriate to a banking institution. It occupies a long and narrow corner site bounded by Montague Street at the south, Clinton Street at the west, and Pierrepont Street at the north. The east elevation abuts another bank building (originally Peoples Trust, now a branch of Citibank), yet the Brooklyn Trust still gives the impression of a discrete urban palazzo, well-proportioned and finely crafted. It is composed in two sections. The rusticated, vermiculated limestone base is articulated by a double-height arcade and mezzanine level. The upper section, or piano nobile, is of smooth-faced limestone with a double-height colonnade in the Corinthian order, with alternating engaged columns and pilasters on shallow piers. The north and south ends of the building have monumental arched entrances, while the long west elevation is punctuated by seven arched windows. The north elevation has a five-story, three-bay annex faced in rusticated limestone. The water table and stairway at the south are of Maine pink granite. The roofing is of Ohio tile. The building is of modern steel-frame construction. Montague Street facade The central round-arched main entrance is recessed and flanked by single rectangular windows covered by protective metal grilles inspired by Italian Renaissance prototypes. Single small square deeply-recessed windows (the grilles now removed) appear above these larger windows at the mezzanine level. All four windows have keystone lintels. Flagpoles project from the lintels at the mezzanine level. At the keystone of the arched entrance is a carved beribboned cartouche with a shield emblazoned with an eagle in profile, and in Roman numerals, the dates 1866 and 1915. Above the shield are crossed keys and a winged helmet. The entrance, approached by a flight of steps, is of special note, with an enframement of a finegrained limestone, known as Napoleon Gray, quarried in Missouri. The design, "after an Italian modeller's cast" by the firm of Donnolly & Ricci, contains scrolled acanthus rinceaux with birds, flowers and animals, emerging at each side from classical urns flanked by centaur-like youths. The style and motifs derive from Roman Imperial art, rediscovered during the Italian Renaissance. This enframement is capped by a lunette with carved acanthus consoles flanking a rectangular plaque inscribed "ERECTED MCMXV" [1915] and surmounted by an American eagle with outstretched wings. A stone grille with alternating classical medallions and urns fills the lunette to each side. Imposing, heavy wrought-iron double-height doors, or gates, of foliate, heart-shaped grillework shield the bronze and glass inner doors. On stone bases to each side of the entrance steps are tall, wrought-iron torcheres. (Fig. 2) These elegant lamp posts — again stylistically derived from Renaissance sources — have four winged and horned, mythological lions supporting an upper tier of tortoises; this base supports a column ornamented by leaves and birds, springing from a base of acanthus, fruit, flowers, and volutes. A single globe light tops each torchere. At the piano nobile, paired rectangular windows with two-over-two sash at both the fourth and fifth stories are recessed in three bays and linked by the double-height Corinthian colonnade. Stone balustrades appear beneath the fourth-story windows, and dark red marble panels separate the windows of the two stories. A
Brooklyn Trust Company (now Chase Bank) Building
Brooklyn Trust Company (now Chase Bank) Building
Downtown Brooklyn, New York, New York City, United States The Brooklyn Trust Company building (now a branch of Chemical Bank), designed by the prominent firm of York & Sawyer, a talented, prolific, and versatile team, was constructed in 1913-16 in a style modeled after the palazzi of the sixteenth-century Italian High Renaissance. The building, gracefully adapted to the imagery and functions of American banking in the early twentieth century, continues to project an image of tradition, stability, and security. Although relatively small, the building is monumentally scaled and beautifully proportioned, executed in fine materials by superb craftsmen. Located near Brooklyn Borough Hall (originally City Hall) and at the edge of Brooklyn Heights, this is the finest of the buildings on the Montague Street block known as "Bank Row." The Brooklyn Trust Company played an important historic role in Brooklyn, from its founding during the aftermath of the Civil War until its consolidation with larger banks beginning in the mid-twentieth century. Its founders, subsequent trustees, and administrators were notable Brooklynites, committed not only to fiduciary but also to community responsibility. Today, the largely-intact building is a reminder of the importance of the institution in the Brooklyn community. Alterations have been minimal and have been carried out with respect for the original fabric and design. Description This very handsome neo-Italian Renaissance style building projects an image of stability, pride, and tradition — all appropriate to a banking institution. It occupies a long and narrow corner site bounded by Montague Street at the south, Clinton Street at the west, and Pierrepont Street at the north. The east elevation abuts another bank building (originally Peoples Trust, now a branch of Citibank), yet the Brooklyn Trust still gives the impression of a discrete urban palazzo, well-proportioned and finely crafted. It is composed in two sections. The rusticated, vermiculated limestone base is articulated by a double-height arcade and mezzanine level. The upper section, or piano nobile, is of smooth-faced limestone with a double-height colonnade in the Corinthian order, with alternating engaged columns and pilasters on shallow piers. The north and south ends of the building have monumental arched entrances, while the long west elevation is punctuated by seven arched windows. The north elevation has a five-story, three-bay annex faced in rusticated limestone. The water table and stairway at the south are of Maine pink granite. The roofing is of Ohio tile. The building is of modern steel-frame construction. Montague Street facade The central round-arched main entrance is recessed and flanked by single rectangular windows covered by protective metal grilles inspired by Italian Renaissance prototypes. Single small square deeply-recessed windows (the grilles now removed) appear above these larger windows at the mezzanine level. All four windows have keystone lintels. Flagpoles project from the lintels at the mezzanine level. At the keystone of the arched entrance is a carved beribboned cartouche with a shield emblazoned with an eagle in profile, and in Roman numerals, the dates 1866 and 1915. Above the shield are crossed keys and a winged helmet. The entrance, approached by a flight of steps, is of special note, with an enframement of a finegrained limestone, known as Napoleon Gray, quarried in Missouri. The design, "after an Italian modeller's cast" by the firm of Donnolly & Ricci, contains scrolled acanthus rinceaux with birds, flowers and animals, emerging at each side from classical urns flanked by centaur-like youths. The style and motifs derive from Roman Imperial art, rediscovered during the Italian Renaissance. This enframement is capped by a lunette with carved acanthus consoles flanking a rectangular plaque inscribed "ERECTED MCMXV" [1915] and surmounted by an American eagle with outstretched wings. A stone grille with alternating classical medallions and urns fills the lunette to each side. Imposing, heavy wrought-iron double-height doors, or gates, of foliate, heart-shaped grillework shield the bronze and glass inner doors. On stone bases to each side of the entrance steps are tall, wrought-iron torcheres. (Fig. 2) These elegant lamp posts — again stylistically derived from Renaissance sources — have four winged and horned, mythological lions supporting an upper tier of tortoises; this base supports a column ornamented by leaves and birds, springing from a base of acanthus, fruit, flowers, and volutes. A single globe light tops each torchere. At the piano nobile, paired rectangular windows with two-over-two sash at both the fourth and fifth stories are recessed in three bays and linked by the double-height Corinthian colonnade. Stone balustrades appear beneath the fourth-story windows, and dark red marble panels separate the windows of the two s

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