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Big Value Tyres. Tomahawk Motorcycle Tires.

Big Value Tyres


big value tyres
    tyres
  • A rubber covering, typically inflated or surrounding an inflated inner tube, placed around a wheel to form a flexible contact with the road
  • A strengthening band of metal fitted around the rim of a wheel
  • (tyre) Sur: a port in southern Lebanon on the Mediterranean Sea; formerly a major Phoenician seaport famous for silks
  • (tyre) tire: hoop that covers a wheel; "automobile tires are usually made of rubber and filled with compressed air"
  • A tire (in American English) or tyre (in British English) is a ring-shaped covering that fits around a wheel rim to protect it and enable better vehicle performance by providing a flexible cushion that absorbs shock while keeping the wheel in close contact with the ground.
    big
  • Grown up
  • large: above average in size or number or quantity or magnitude or extent; "a large city"; "set out for the big city"; "a large sum"; "a big (or large) barn"; "a large family"; "big businesses"; "a big expenditure"; "a large number of newspapers"; "a big group of scientists"; "large areas of the
  • Of considerable size, extent, or intensity
  • Of a large or the largest size
  • boastfully: in a boastful manner; "he talked big all evening"
  • extremely well; "his performance went over big"

The Cluetrain manifesto
The Cluetrain manifesto
Read the 95 theses of online market places and people of the earth :-)  (1999)Markets are conversations. Markets consist of human beings, not demographic sectors. Conversations among human beings sound human. They are conducted in a human voice. Whether delivering information, opinions, perspectives, dissenting arguments or humorous asides, the human voice is typically open, natural, uncontrived. People recognize each other as such from the sound of this voice. The Internet is enabling conversations among human beings that were simply not possible in the era of mass media. Hyperlinks subvert hierarchy. In both internetworked markets and among intranetworked employees, people are speaking to each other in a powerful new way. These networked conversations are enabling powerful new forms of social organization and knowledge exchange to emerge. As a result, markets are getting smarter, more informed, more organized. Participation in a networked market changes people fundamentally. People in networked markets have figured out that they get far better information and support from one another than from vendors. So much for corporate rhetoric about adding value to commoditized products. There are no secrets. The networked market knows more than companies do about their own products. And whether the news is good or bad, they tell everyone. What's happening to markets is also happening among employees. A metaphysical construct called "The Company" is the only thing standing between the two. Corporations do not speak in the same voice as these new networked conversations. To their intended online audiences, companies sound hollow, flat, literally inhuman. In just a few more years, the current homogenized "voice" of business—the sound of mission statements and brochures—will seem as contrived and artificial as the language of the 18th century French court. Already, companies that speak in the language of the pitch, the dog-and-pony show, are no longer speaking to anyone. Companies that assume online markets are the same markets that used to watch their ads on television are kidding themselves. Companies that don't realize their markets are now networked person-to-person, getting smarter as a result and deeply joined in conversation are missing their best opportunity. Companies can now communicate with their markets directly. If they blow it, it could be their last chance. Companies need to realize their markets are often laughing. At them. Companies need to lighten up and take themselves less seriously. They need to get a sense of humor. Getting a sense of humor does not mean putting some jokes on the corporate web site. Rather, it requires big values, a little humility, straight talk, and a genuine point of view. Companies attempting to "position" themselves need to take a position. Optimally, it should relate to something their market actually cares about. Bombastic boasts—"We are positioned to become the preeminent provider of XYZ"—do not constitute a position. Companies need to come down from their Ivory Towers and talk to the people with whom they hope to create relationships. Public Relations does not relate to the public. Companies are deeply afraid of their markets. By speaking in language that is distant, uninviting, arrogant, they build walls to keep markets at bay. Most marketing programs are based on the fear that the market might see what's really going on inside the company. Elvis said it best: "We can't go on together with suspicious minds." Brand loyalty is the corporate version of going steady, but the breakup is inevitable—and coming fast. Because they are networked, smart markets are able to renegotiate relationships with blinding speed. Networked markets can change suppliers overnight. Networked knowledge workers can change employers over lunch. Your own "downsizing initiatives" taught us to ask the question: "Loyalty? What's that?" Smart markets will find suppliers who speak their own language. Learning to speak with a human voice is not a parlor trick. It can't be "picked up" at some tony conference. To speak with a human voice, companies must share the concerns of their communities. But first, they must belong to a community. Companies must ask themselves where their corporate cultures end. If their cultures end before the community begins, they will have no market. Human communities are based on discourse—on human speech about human concerns. The community of discourse is the market. Companies that do not belong to a community of discourse will die. Companies make a religion of security, but this is largely a red herring. Most are protecting less against competitors than against their own market and workforce. As with networked markets, people are also talking to each other directly inside the company—and not just about rules and regulations, boardroom directives, bottom
LUNACY ON THE LEFT...........RINGMASTER OBAMA BRINGS SAME TIRED OLD SHOW
LUNACY ON THE LEFT...........RINGMASTER OBAMA BRINGS SAME TIRED OLD SHOW
President Obama is politically insane. This is the real meaning of his speech Thursday night in front of a joint session of Congress. Albert Einstein defined insanity as doing the same thing over and over, expecting a different result. By that definition, Mr. Obama is a lunatic leftist. Much of his speech called for more of the same - government activism; massive spending on infrastructure, bridges and roads; extending the payroll tax cut; and more public aid to states and municipalities. In short, he seeks to perpetuate the dismal policies of Obamanomics. He is a reckless ideologue masquerading as a pragmatist. Mr. Obama’s presidency has been dominated by one seminal reality - failure. His nearly $1 trillion stimulus; record budget deficits; unprecedented levels of public spending; the government bailouts of the auto, insurance, housing and banking sectors; billions heaped on “green jobs”; Obamacare; Dodd-Frank to reform Wall Street, and huge outlays for food stamps and unemployment benefits - all have failed to restore the economy. In fact, they have done the opposite. Unemployment is 9.1 percent. Growth is anemic. In August, no new net jobs - none - were created. Consumer confidence is low. Inflation is rising. The value of the dollar plummets. Burdensome regulations are strangling business. America is being buried under a mountain of debt. For the first time in history, its credit rating has been downgraded. The country is not only on the verge of national bankruptcy, but of economic collapse. Any reasonable person would change course - but not Mr. Obama. He is a big-government liberal who worships at the altar of statism. The fact that we are broke and can no longer afford his borrow-and-spend policies means nothing. Like all fanatics, he is disconnected from reality. Contrary to popular myth, liberalism is not politics committed to science or rational thought. It is a substitute religion - a secular philosophy similar to Marxism that seeks to replace Christianity and provide believers with existential meaning. Hence, it must be defended at all costs, even in the face of irrefutable evidence or logic. Mr. Obama is not an anomaly among progressives. They share his stubbornness. Reassessment is not possible. If Mr. Obama truly were to tack to the center, it would represent a fatal admission of error. The liberal faith would collapse. This is why left-wing Democrats are demanding that he defy the Tea Party - and reality. Rep. Maxine Waters of California is urging Mr. Obama to pass another trillion-dollar stimulus. New York Times columnist Paul Krugman argues that Obamanomics has not spent, borrowed or taxed enough. The problem is not Keynesian liberalism, but the lack of sufficient zeal. In Bolshevik Russia, hard-core communists criticized Soviet leader Vladimir Lenin for not completely abolishing private property. They argued that it was Lenin’s “deviationism” from Marxist orthodoxy - not central economic planning and state socialism - that explained the failures of the Soviet system. For liberals, Mr. Obama is now the new Lenin. Yet, Mr. Obama - like Lenin - cannot escape the consequences of his disastrous worldview. Whether it’s $300 billion, $1 trillion or $10 trillion - no amount of “stimulus” or public spending will provide a long-term cure for the ailing economy. The reason is simple: Government does not - and cannot - create wealth. Only the vibrant free market can. This is why liberals are now left with only two options: lie about Mr. Obama’s record or engage in dangerous demagoguery. Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz is more of a cheap propagandist than a serious party spokesperson. Mrs. Wasserman Schultz insists that Mr. Obama’s stimulus “worked.” The “facts” speak for themselves, she says. They don’t. In 2009, Mr. Obama vowed that if the stimulus were passed, the jobless rate would remain under 8 percent. Under his tenure, America has lost more than 2 million private-sector jobs. Mrs. Wasserman Schultz is the equivalent of a Stalinist-era hack jabbering about the Soviet economic miracle. No one believes her - not even her staunchest supporters. This leaves political gangsterism. Teamsters President Jimmy Hoffa recently said that it’s time for unions to declare “war” on Republicans and Tea Partyers. “President Obama, this is your army,” Mr. Hoffa thundered at a Sept. 5 Labor Day rally in Detroit. “We are ready to march. Let’s take these SOBs out and give America back to an America where we belong.” Mr. Hoffa’s comments were vile, reprehensible and could foment civil violence. Labor unions, such as the Teamsters, have a long history of street brawls and physically intimidating opponents. Once these kinds of furies have been unleashed, it is difficult to contain them. The Democrats’ hypocrisy is staggering. For days following the Tucson shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and others, leading Democrats and the liberal media blamed conservative talk ra

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