EASY TO USE DIGITAL CAMERA : USE DIGITAL CAMERA

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Easy To Use Digital Camera


easy to use digital camera
    digital camera
  • a camera that encodes an image digitally and store it for later reproduction
  • A digital camera (also digicam or camera for short) is a camera that takes video or still photographs, or both, digitally by recording images via an electronic image sensor.
  • A camera that records and stores digital images
  • Usually captures images with the help of a CCD chip. The image data received is then saved to special memory cards or other storage media. (SmartMedia, xD-Picture Card,  Compact Flash,  Memory Stick,  SD Card,  MMC Card)
    to use
  • addListener , you must first create a listener object. A listener object is an object that receives notification from an event when that event is triggered in a movie. Listener objects of the Stage object receive notification from Stage.onResize .
    easy
  • Be careful
  • easily: with ease (`easy' is sometimes used informally for `easily'); "she was easily excited"; "was easily confused"; "he won easily"; "this china breaks very easily"; "success came too easy"
  • posing no difficulty; requiring little effort; "an easy job"; "an easy problem"; "an easy victory"; "the house is easy to heat"; "satisfied with easy answers"; "took the easy way out of his dilemma"
  • not hurried or forced; "an easy walk around the block"; "at a leisurely (or easygoing) pace"
easy to use digital camera - Kodak Easyshare
Kodak Easyshare CX7430 4 MP Digital Camera with 3xOptical Zoom
Kodak Easyshare CX7430 4 MP Digital Camera with 3xOptical Zoom
MD) CL) KODAK CX7430 DIGITAL Camera

Kodak's EasyShare CX7430 offers high-resolution image capture with fully automatic point-and-shoot simplicity. You'll be able to print vibrant 20 x 30-inch enlargements thanks to the CX7430's resolution. The CX7430 also integrates Kodak's new camera Favorites feature for storing multiple pictures in an on-camera digital photo album. Other features include a 3x optical zoom, Kodak's new Color Science image processing, TV-quality (VGA) video capture and playback capability, an on-camera speaker, 16 MB internal memory, and compatibility with SD and MCC memory cards.
Kodak's preset scene modes
Scene modes--represented above by pictograms--automatically control camera settings to give you what's right for your particular shot.
Optics and Resolution
This camera has a maximum resolution of 4 megapixels (2304 x 1728 pixels), and it offers a 3.5 MP mode (optimized ratio for 4 x 6-inch prints), 2.1 MP, and 1.1 MP (good for emailing. The CX7430 has a Kokak Retinar aspheric all-glass lens with a 3x optical zoom (34-102mm, 35mm equivalent). It features through-the-lens (TTL) autofocus with multi-zone and center-spot selectable modes.
Movie Mode
The CX7430 can capture both full-motion video with audio (20 frames per second at 320 x 240 pixels) and TV-resolution video (VGA; 640 x 480 pixels at 13 fps) with capacity dependent on available memory (16 MB internal memory included; additional memory may be added via the SD/MMC expansion slot). The included A/V cable enables you to show your masterpiece on TV quickly and easily.
More Features

1.6-inch indoor/outdoor LCD with 2x or 4x magnification
Built-in flash with auto, red-eye, fill, and off modes
White balance controls: auto, daylight, tungsten, and fluorescent
Scene modes: auot, portrait, landscape, night, close-up, sport, and movie
Color modes: Color, black and white, sepia
Click to capture time: 0.6 seconds
10-second self timer
Storage and Transfer
Images can be stored within the CX7430's 16 MB internal memory, or on optional Secure Digital (SD) or MultiMedia (MMC) memory cards. It connects to Macs and Windows-based PCs via USB 1.1 connectivity.
Kodak's on-screen menu
Clear, easy-to-use menus explain the camera's many features.
Sharing
With a touch of the red-jeweled Share button, you can store up to 100 pictures in an on-camera digital album. These pictures can then be shared anytime on the camera's large, 1.6-inch indoor/outdoor LCD screen. The Share button also allows selection of photos for printing and even e-mailing, with up to 32 e-mail addresses stored in the camera's memory.
Kodak Color Science Image Processing Chip
Kodak's Color Science Image Processing Chip offers a new high-speed digital image processor, advanced algorithms, and hardware acceleration features that enable the CX7430 make simultaneous, split-second decisions to produce rich, vibrant, true-to-life colors in almost any lighting situation. Each time you click the shutter, the Kodak Color Science Chip performs an instantaneous and advanced analysis of collected scene data to identify and correct multiple factors that influence picture quality. Scene light source is detected and adjustments are made to capture bright whites and true, vivid colors under difficult lighting conditions--fluorescent, tungsten or daylight. Scene content is analyzed for luminance, focal distance, subject matter orientation and color to determine the correct exposure and capture the natural details, accurate flesh tones, and rich colors you see in your composition.
Power and Size
The camera is powered by 2 AA batteries (alkaline included; NiMH rechargeables recommended). It measures 4.0 x 2.6 1.5 inches (W x H x D) and weighs 5.2 ounces without batteries.
What's in the Box
This package contains the Kodak CX7430 digital camera, 2 AA batteries, USB and A/V cables, wrist strap, and custom camera insert for optional Kodak EasyShare 6000 series camera and printer docks.
Like all EasyShare cameras, the CX7430 includes Kodak EasyShare software for Windows and Macintosh systems, providing effortless digital picture transfer, organization, basic editing, sharing and printing. The software's exclusive One Touch to Better Pictures feature--which takes advantage of proprietary color technologies developed by Kodak--helps Windows OS users get vibrant, true-to-life prints from home inkjet printers, while significantly reducing the trial, error and waste usually associated with home photo printing.

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DIY cables for wired or radio remote to nikon 10-pin cameras
DIY cables for wired or radio remote to nikon 10-pin cameras
This is a diagram for modifying the Yongnuo remote switch RS-N1 for use with Nikon camera bodies that use the 10-pin connector for extending the length of a hard-wired remote release AND for making permanent pre-release cable to remote fire the camera using radio remotes such as PocketWizard, Quantum or Cactus to name a few with a permanent pre-release cable setup. That means the camera is never allowed to sleep the meter/focus so battery runtime is significantly shortened. Why the Yongnuo cable release? Because it's about $9 USD on ebay instead of $50 for the Nikon MC30 or equivalent cable release. Nikon makes other models including one that ends with three connectors that are easy to modify. Note that this diagram DOES NOT show the colors of the wires for Nikon cable releases. caution: factory warranties are almost always void by do-it-yourself projects such as this project. parts list: one Yongnuo remote switch RS-N1 (about $9 USD on ebay) one 3.5mm mono jack (a free source is the television video cable that comes with most digital cameras. cut at a point at least 15cm/6inches AWAY from the end of the 3.5mm jack) three RJ-11 telephone jack connectors (about $12USD for 25) 50cm/18 inches of telephone wiring (at least 4 wire such as Cat3 wiring) at least one dual RJ-11 connector so you can connect either the wired remote release OR the jack to plug into a radio remote one more dual RJ-11 connector if you want to have very long wired remote runs using very inexpensive telephone cords. tools soldering tool, flux, solder wire cutter, wire stripper, finger nail clippers shrink wrap tubing (use small shkrinkwrap tubing to insulate all solder connections and use large shrinkwrap tubing to cover/protect exterior connections) RJ-11 crimper multimeter (to test continuity) directions 1. cut the Yongnuo cable release in half. you can use the far more expensive camera-branded cable release if you wish. 2. cut three lengths of 4-wire telephone cable each about 15cm/6inches in length 3. separate and strip all ends of all wires 4. follow the diagram to match up the wires (red yellow and white in this diagram is what Yongnuo uses (at least in this batch of remotes) 5. use pliers to make clean twists on wiring connections, flux, solder and test for continuity. it's alot easier to check along the way that it is to tear everything apart at the end to fix one thing 6. insulate all connections 7. crimp RJ-11 connectors using 3 of the 4 connections. this diagram leaves a space empty but you can do it your way, just remember to document your way and stick with it. You will end up with three cables: i. remote switch to RJ-11 ii. Nikon 10-pin to RJ-11 iii. 3.5mm to RJ-11 8. test continuity of everything 9. use the double-ended RJ-11 connector so one end goes to the camera and the other end goes to either the wired-cable release or to the 3.5mm jack for the radio remotes use a second double-ended RJ-11 connector so you can run a very long run of telephone cable to the wired-cable release. 10. connect everything and try it out. note: for hard-wired camera remotes and radio remote camera releases, you can still trigger off camera strobes by placing a transmitter on the hotshoe of your remote camera. place the receiver that connects to the camera somewhere else.
the introduction to digital
the introduction to digital
My introduction to the digital photography world. Coming from shooting 110 film (remember the cube flash? haha), this was the next big thing! With mind-blowing 640x480 photo resolution, 8mm lens, 1/30 to 1/175 shutter speed (auto only), and 1MB flash memory! All this for about $600-$700. Back in 1995, how could you go wrong? =P -------------------- Article from Wikipedia: The Apple QuickTake (codenamed Venus, Mars, Neptune) was one of the first consumer digital camera lines.[1] It was launched in 1994 by Apple Computer and was marketed for three years before being discontinued in 1997. In 1992, Apple Computer started marketing plans for a digital camera called QuickTake, codenamed Venus. At the time over $12 billion was spent annually in the United States on photography. Apple searched for a company to design and manufacture their QuickTake digital Camera line. It should be noted as fact, that Kodak had already been selling their own self-branded version of this camera, made in Japan by Chinon Industries, for over a year. The QuickTake 100 was released in 1994 as an easy-to-use digital camera that connected to any Macintosh computer by way of an Apple serial cable. The camera was capable of storing eight photos at 640x480 resolution, 32 photos at 320x240 resolution, or a mixture of both sizes. All photos were at 24-bit color. The camera had a built-in flash, but no focus or zoom controls. Other than downloading the photos to a computer, there was no way to preview them on the camera, nor was there any way to delete individual photos from the camera (though there was a recessed 'trash' button which would delete the entire contents of the camera). It was one of the first digital cameras that were targeted to consumers to be released. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_QuickTake

easy to use digital camera
easy to use digital camera
How to use iOS 5 - A step by step guide
iOS 5 is Apple's most comprehensive and complete system upgrade ever with over 200 new features. This all new book will give you a comprehensive
guide to using, and getting the most out of this new Apple operating system.

You will learn all about these and many more features:

iCloud: iOS 5 will be the first platform to run on Apple's new cloud infrastructure called iCloud. iCloud is a free service and users get 5 GB by signing up, but users can buy more storage if they so choose. By plugging into a power source, iCloud automatically pushes all documents, apps, calendars, mail, contacts, photos, and music to all of the user's other iOS devices. As Tim Cook says, "It just works."

iMessage: Accessibility is the theme for Apple's fall 2011 line-up of mobile devices. iOS 5 replaces the Messages app with iMessages, which Apple's new free text messaging service. Similar to BlackBerry's Messenger, iMessages allows iOS users to send unlimited texts to anyone who owns an iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch. With wireless syncing, users can start a conversation on one device and continue it on another, and can also track their messages further with delivery and optional read receipts. iMessage works for sending texts, photos, locations, and contacts.

Notification Center: In iOS 4, all phone activity was paused in order to display a new notification. Notifications are no longer in the way in iOS 5, as incoming messages and app notifications appear briefly at the top without interrupting activity on the phone, and all messages are kept organized within a convenient Notification Center. It's easy to access—users need only swipe down from the top of the screen to enter the Notification Center. Furthermore, new notifications can be viewed and attended to directly from the Lock Screen, making for quick and easy access.

New Lifestyle Apps: iOS 5 is all about making life easier for the user. An Apple-designed Reminders app aims to keep users organized and on time, and Newsstand neatly arranges news app subscriptions all in one place and automatically updates the user with the latest issue. The new Cards app is Apple's response to the greeting card industry. Cards lets users quickly design and send beautiful, cheap, 100 percent cotton "tree-free" cards to friends and loved ones. The app goes one step further by notifying users the second the card is delivered by the postal service. Find My Friends is a great way to organize events with other users, whether for a temporary rendezvous or a days-long event. And for those parents still wondering where their children are at 10 p.m., Find My Friends app, paired with the right Parental Controls, can allow parents to instantly view their location of their children on a map.

Overhauled Apps: Mail and Calendar are two old apps that will look brand-new on iOS 5. In Mail, users can write in rich text, indent paragraphs, flag important messages, and search the archive in the body of messages. In Calendar, events are easier to create, manage, and view. iCloud syncs calendars to other devices, and even with select family and friends. Photos is also completely redesigned; no longer is the app simply a library for your photos. Users will be able to edit and crop their photos, add enhancements, or even remove red eye directly on the iOS device.

Camera Upgrade: Apple's latest mobile upgrade will change the phone's camera interface. With two clicks of the home button, users can access the camera from the lock screen and start shooting. Users can pinch the screen to zoom, tap the screen to focus and can now shoot photos with a click of the + volume button.

Safari Overhaul: Apple doesn't like that its Safari browser is the third most popular Web browser after Google Chrome and Firefox. With iOS 5, Safari finally catches up to its competitors with tabbed browsing, a Reading List to save articles for later reading on any iOS device (thanks to iCloud),.

iOS 5 is Apple's most comprehensive and complete system upgrade ever with over 200 new features. This all new book will give you a comprehensive
guide to using, and getting the most out of this new Apple operating system.

You will learn all about these and many more features:

iCloud: iOS 5 will be the first platform to run on Apple's new cloud infrastructure called iCloud. iCloud is a free service and users get 5 GB by signing up, but users can buy more storage if they so choose. By plugging into a power source, iCloud automatically pushes all documents, apps, calendars, mail, contacts, photos, and music to all of the user's other iOS devices. As Tim Cook says, "It just works."

iMessage: Accessibility is the theme for Apple's fall 2011 line-up of mobile devices. iOS 5 replaces the Messages app with iMessages, which Apple's new free text messaging service. Similar to BlackBerry's Messenger, iMessages allows iOS users to send unlimited texts to anyone who owns an iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch. With wireless syncing, users can start a conversation on one device and continue it on another, and can also track their messages further with delivery and optional read receipts. iMessage works for sending texts, photos, locations, and contacts.

Notification Center: In iOS 4, all phone activity was paused in order to display a new notification. Notifications are no longer in the way in iOS 5, as incoming messages and app notifications appear briefly at the top without interrupting activity on the phone, and all messages are kept organized within a convenient Notification Center. It's easy to access—users need only swipe down from the top of the screen to enter the Notification Center. Furthermore, new notifications can be viewed and attended to directly from the Lock Screen, making for quick and easy access.

New Lifestyle Apps: iOS 5 is all about making life easier for the user. An Apple-designed Reminders app aims to keep users organized and on time, and Newsstand neatly arranges news app subscriptions all in one place and automatically updates the user with the latest issue. The new Cards app is Apple's response to the greeting card industry. Cards lets users quickly design and send beautiful, cheap, 100 percent cotton "tree-free" cards to friends and loved ones. The app goes one step further by notifying users the second the card is delivered by the postal service. Find My Friends is a great way to organize events with other users, whether for a temporary rendezvous or a days-long event. And for those parents still wondering where their children are at 10 p.m., Find My Friends app, paired with the right Parental Controls, can allow parents to instantly view their location of their children on a map.

Overhauled Apps: Mail and Calendar are two old apps that will look brand-new on iOS 5. In Mail, users can write in rich text, indent paragraphs, flag important messages, and search the archive in the body of messages. In Calendar, events are easier to create, manage, and view. iCloud syncs calendars to other devices, and even with select family and friends. Photos is also completely redesigned; no longer is the app simply a library for your photos. Users will be able to edit and crop their photos, add enhancements, or even remove red eye directly on the iOS device.

Camera Upgrade: Apple's latest mobile upgrade will change the phone's camera interface. With two clicks of the home button, users can access the camera from the lock screen and start shooting. Users can pinch the screen to zoom, tap the screen to focus and can now shoot photos with a click of the + volume button.

Safari Overhaul: Apple doesn't like that its Safari browser is the third most popular Web browser after Google Chrome and Firefox. With iOS 5, Safari finally catches up to its competitors with tabbed browsing, a Reading List to save articles for later reading on any iOS device (thanks to iCloud),.

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