WORKING OF FUEL INJECTION PUMP. WORKING OF FUEL

WORKING OF FUEL INJECTION PUMP. COMMERCIAL SHEARING HYDRAULIC PUMP

Working Of Fuel Injection Pump


working of fuel injection pump
    fuel injection
  • Fuel injection is a system for mixing fuel with air in an internal combustion engine. It has become the primary fuel delivery system used in automotive petrol engines, having almost completely replaced carburetors in the late 1980s.
  • (Fuel Injected) A mechanical device that 'injects' or introduces fuel into a engine
  • The direct introduction of fuel under pressure into the combustion units of an internal combustion engine
  • mechanical system to inject atomized fuel directly into the cylinders of an internal-combustion engine; avoids the need for a carburetor
    working
  • The action of doing work
  • working(a): actively engaged in paid work; "the working population"; "the ratio of working men to unemployed"; "a working mother"; "robots can be on the job day and night"
  • a mine or quarry that is being or has been worked
  • The action of extracting minerals from a mine
  • A mine or a part of a mine from which minerals are being extracted
  • adequate for practical use; especially sufficient in strength or numbers to accomplish something; "the party has a working majority in the House"; "a working knowledge of Spanish"
    pump
  • operate like a pump; move up and down, like a handle or a pedal; "pump the gas pedal"
  • A woman's plain, lightweight shoe that has a low-cut upper, no fastening, and typically a medium heel
  • A man's slip-on patent leather shoe for formal wear
  • A light shoe, in particular
  • deliver forth; "pump bullets into the dummy"
  • a mechanical device that moves fluid or gas by pressure or suction
working of fuel injection pump - Engine Management:
Engine Management: Advanced Tuning
Engine Management: Advanced Tuning
As tools for tuning modern engines have become more powerful and sophisticated in recent years, the need for in-depth knowledge of engine management systems and tuning techniques has grown. Tuning engines can be a mysterious art, all engines need a precise balance of fuel, air, and timing in order to reach their true performance potential. This book explains how the EFI system determines engine operation and how the calibrator can change the controlling parameters to optimize actual engine performance. Engine Management: Advanced Tuning takes engine-tuning techniques to the next level. It is a must-have for tuners and calibrators and a valuable resource for anyone who wants to make horsepower with a fuel-injected, electronically controlled engine. Author Greg Banish is a calibration engineer with extensive aftermarket performance calibration experience. He has a BSME from GMI Engineering and Management Institute (Kettering University). With over a thousand unique calibrations performed over five years, he has worked with enthusiasts and OEMs alike to improve the performance and driving behavior of a wide range of vehicles. The book contains detailed equations, graphs, and illustrations. Also included are valuable and practical examples, including real-world examples based upon the author’s experience that will help more advanced readers apply this new information to situations that are commonly seen during calibration.

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Mercedes 300 SL
Mercedes 300 SL
The Mercedes-Benz 300SL was introduced in 1954 as a two-seat, closed sports car with characteristic gull-wing doors. Later it was offered as an open roadster. Built by Daimler-Benz AG and internally numbered W198, the fuel-injected road version was based (somewhat loosely) on the company's highly successful competition-only sports car of 1952, the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (W194) which had less power, as it still had carburetors. The road model was suggested by Max Hoffman. Because it was intended for customers whose preferences were reported to Hoffman by dealers he supplied in the booming, post-war American market, it was introduced at the 1954 New York Auto Show—unlike previous models introduced at either the Frankfurt or Geneva shows. The 300SL was best known for both its distinctive gullwing or butterfly wing doors and for being the first-ever gasoline-powered car equipped with fuel injection directly into the combustion chamber. The gullwing version was available from March 1955 to 1957. In Mercedes-Benz fashion, the "300" referred to the engine's cylinder displacement, in this case, three liters. The "SL", as applied to a roadster, stood for "Sport Leicht" or "Sport Light." More widely produced (25,881 units) and starting in 1954 was the similar-looking 190SL with a 105 hp (78 kW) 4cyl engine, available only as roadster (or with an additional hardtop, as Coupe Roadster). The 190SL, based on a shortened 180 saloon floorpan, was equivalent to today's SLK in its market positioning when compared to the SL.[2] Production for both the 190SL and 300SL ended in 1963 when the 230SL was introduced. The gullwing doors, hinged at the roof and so named because the open doors resembled a bird's outstretched wings, were implemented as such to accommodate for the car's tubular chassis, designed by DBAG's chief developing engineer, Rudolf Uhlenhaut. Part of the chassis passed through what would be the lower half of a standard door. his tubular chassis was a necessity, as the original car was designed solely for racing and needed to be as light as possible due to the rather underpowered original, carbureted, engine, while still providing a high level of strength. This required the driver and any passengers to do some gymnastics to get in or out of the car, usually by sitting on and sliding across the wide door sill, which was kind of challenging for ladies wearing a skirt. A steering wheel with a tilt-away column made the process considerably easier. It was Max Hoffman, Daimler-Benz's official importer in the USA, who convinced DBAG management in Stuttgart that a street version of the 300SL would be a commercial success, especially in the US. Hoffman's prediction was correct since more than 80% of the vehicle's total production of approximately 1400 units were sold in the US, making the Gullwing the first Mercedes-Benz which sold in bulk outside its home market. The 300SL is credited for changing the company's image in America from a manufacturer of solid, but staid, automobiles to that of a producer of sporty cars. The body was mainly steel, except for the aluminium bonnet (hood), doors and boot (trunk) lid. The 300SL could also be ordered with an all-aluminium outer skin, saving 80 kg (176 lb), but at tremendous added cost. The engine, canted at a fifty-degree angle to the left to allow for a lower hoodline, was the same 3.0 litre straight-6 as the regular four-door 300 but with a Bosch mechanical direct fuel injection system that almost doubled its original power of 86 kW (115 hp) in the original carbureted trim. This new injection system was a first in any gasoline-powered car - apart from the rather small Gutbrod where the Mercedes engineers, who had developed the principle for the DB 601 fighter aircraft engine, had to work after the war. It allowed a top speed of up to 260 km/h (161 mph) depending on gear ratio (several options were available) and drag (bumpers were optional, and race tyres fitted for tests), making the 300SL the fastest production car of its time. The maintenance requirements were high, unlike the current electrically powered fuel injection systems, the mechanical fuel pump would continue to inject gasoline into the engine during the interval between shutting off the ignition and the engine's coming to a stop; this gasoline was of course not burned, and washed the oil from the cylinder walls and ended up diluting the engine's lubricating oil, particularly if the engine was not driven hard enough nor long enough to reach a temperature high enough to evaporate it out of the oil. Exacerbating the problem were the large oil cooler as well as the large volume of oil (10 liters), both oriented more to racing than to street driving, which virtually guaranteed that the oil would not reach a high enough temperature. In practice, many street drivers would block off airflow through the oil cooler, and the recommended oil change interval was 1,000 miles (1,600 km)
Parilla fuel tank
Parilla fuel tank
Giovanni Parrilla (that is the correct spelling of his name before they dropped one "R" to make it easier to pronounce) was born in Southern Italy in 1912. Giovanni opened his first business near Milan Italy in which he worked on diesel injection pumps and was a Bosch spark plug wholesaler. After WWII in October 1946, Giovanni released two newly designed racing motorcycles (first new Italian racing design since the end of the war). By late 1953 and into 1954, a new over-the-counter production racer was released called the 175 cc Competizione, which was later upgraded into the 175 cc MSDS. Later both 200 cc and 250 cc versions of this motorcycle were built exclusively for the North American market.

working of fuel injection pump
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