Frank Quosdorf, ICF PCC

Dear Parents and Carers, I am the Principal Coach at Positive Parenting 3338 with 15 years of coaching and facilitation experience. As accredited provider of a number of internationally acclaimed parenting and change programs, I am passionate about helping parents and carers master challenges they experience raising their children of all ages.

Facilitating parenting seminars, group and individual programs.

Topics include: parenting styles, parents' and children's temperament traits, child and brain development, resilience, rewards and consequences, managing child misbehaviour, anxieties, family transitions, 0-12 and teens.

In-person or via videoconferencing.

Contact me via parenting@quosdorf.com

Check out my Facebook page HERE

Transitioning into primary school - Tips and Tricks for parents of children who start primary school

The Department of Education website lists the following as key for children to start learning when they enter primary school: ‘Phonological knowledge and skills’, ‘Grapheme-phoneme correspondence knowledge’, ‘Magnitude comparison’, ‘Subitising’, and more. Ouch! This sounds scary! As a parent of a child in this age group you might ask yourself one, some or all of the following questions:

“Is this really what my child needs to be exposed to at this age?”

“Isn’t playing and socialising enough?”

“How is my child going to handle all this?”

“What if my child cannot keep up with ‘grapheme-phoneme correspondence’ or is unable to ‘subitise’?”

“Will my child be able to sit still and concentrate during class?”

“How will my child deal with all this change and all these new people and challenges?”

Luckily, there are ways you can help your child be confident and competent in primary school.

Join one of my upcoming parenting seminars to find answers to these and other parenting questions. Visit my Facebook page to find out about the next seminar.

The Power of Positive Parenting (Triple P) - Five principles underpinning positive parenting

Consider the following scenario: Oliver (10) and his sister Mia (7) have been bickering over petty things all Sunday morning. Their parent has been trying to concentrate on some chores. Frustration is building with how the children behave. Now, the children are fighting over who gets to use the tablet; Oliver screaming; Mia whining; both holding on to the tablet. Hearing and seeing this, the parent rushes to the scene, rips the tablet out of their hands and shouts “Oliver! Mia! That’s enough! No tablet anymore for today!” Now, both children are whining.

Sounds familiar?

Positive Parenting is an evidence-based approach to raising healthy, well-adjusted, confident and resilient children. What exactly does Positive Parenting mean? In the above scenario, how would Positive Parenting help the parent constructively influence how the children play and interact?

Join one of my upcoming parenting seminars to find answers to these and other parenting questions. Visit my Facebook page to find out about the next seminar.

Raising confident and competent children (Triple P) - Six key skills children need to succeed in life

Here’s a short story about 7-year-old boy Noah: Friday late afternoon, Noah, seemingly bored, says to his parent (with a tone of voice that hints a sense of entitlement): “I want to play Minecraft now.” The parent hands over the tablet.

And there is one about Noah’s 5-year-old sister, Sienna: When she’s hungry, she approaches her parent saying “I’m hungry. I want a banana.” Her parent hands her a banana.

What do these children learn from how their parent responds to their requests? Does the parent’s response help them learn to be polite?

Which parenting strategies can help children build one of the key skills towards becoming a successful adult: showing respect to others?

Join one of my upcoming parenting seminars to find answers to these and other parenting questions. Visit my Facebook page to find out about the next seminar.

Raising resilient children (Triple P) - Six life skills that help children manage their emotions

Today’s world is one of constant change, challenge, and pressure to perform. Mental health issues are on the rise, especially among children. It is paramount for children to have the skills that help them embrace and cope with everyday situations and stressful life events.

Consider the following two scenarios:

(A) 5-year-old Ava is playing with her Legos, trying to build a castle. When the pieces don’t fit together, she starts growling and seconds later violently throws the Lego pieces around the room.

(B) 9-year-old Logan’s school bus stops near his house. Until now, his parents have done the drop-offs and pick-ups at the bus stop. They now believe that it is time for him to walk to and from the bus stop on his own. Hearing this, Logan retreats to his room slamming the door.

Some of the key skills for children towards becoming resilient are: to recognise, accept and appropriately express how they feel; to build a positive outlook; and to develop coping skills that help dealing with negative emotions and upsetting or stressful life events.

What can parents do to help children build these key skills?

Part 3 of the Triple P (Positive Parenting Program) Seminar Series takes a closer look at emotional resilience.

Join one of my upcoming parenting seminars to find answers to these and other parenting questions. Visit my Facebook page to find out about the next seminar.

Tuning into children’s brains - The 4 parts of the brain, and how parents can support healthy brain development

Consider the following situation involving 7-year-old Sophie and her parent:

Sophie’s parent asks her to put her toys away and help set the dinner table. Sophie keeps playing. Her parent, in a slightly agitated voice, requests again “Sophie, put your toys away and help set the dinner table now”. Sophie keeps playing. Her parent gets frustrated with being ignored. How does the story continue?

There are several possible endings to this story. What’s more important is to ask the following questions: What is going on in Sophie’s brain? And, how does Sophie’s behaviour influence what is going on in her parent’s brain?

Looking at their children’s behaviour, many parents ask themselves at times: “Why is she doing that right now?” or “Why is he not listening?” or “Why do I have to say the same thing over and over?”

Understanding how children’s brains develop gives an insight into these and other “why” questions.

Bringing Up Great Kids (BUGK) has been developed by the Australian Childhood Foundation. More than 50,000 parents have benefited from the program since its start in 2005.

Join one of my upcoming parenting seminars to find answers to these and other parenting questions. Visit my Facebook page to find out about the next seminar.

Three Parenting Styles and how they influence children's behaviour

Have a look at the following scenario: Lucy (3 years old) wants a bag of lollies while in the supermarket with her Dad. At first, Dad does not respond. When Lucy gets louder with her demand, Dad says "Ok then, have your lollies. You happy now?"

Here is another scenario: At times, Parker (8 years old) is still a bit wild with his baby sister Lily. In the afternoon, he is jumping on his trampoline with her. Lily suddenly starts crying. Hearing Lily cry, mum jumps towards the trampoline and shouts "Parker! That's it! Off the trampoline!" Parker tries to explain "But mum, she just fell over without me doing anything," to which mum replies "Off the trampoline, now!"

Two of the key skills children need to develop on their journey to becoming mature adults are negotiating and compromising. Given their parents’ style of parenting, how likely are the children going to develop these skills? Which parenting style would be most helpful in these situations?

Join one of my upcoming parenting seminars to find answers to these and other parenting questions. Visit my Facebook page to find out about the next seminar.

Child Developmental Stages and how parents can encourage and support healthy child development

For many parents and carers, professional checks and guidance on child development stop after the last maternal and child health nurse visit at around 40 months or even before. And then?

Every child moves through their individual developmental journey that lasts into young adulthood. Contemporary research shows that brain development continues even into a person’s mid-twenties.

What does "child development" and "developmental stage" mean? What are some of the developmental jobs children have to master until they are 18 years old? And how can parents encourage and support their children’s healthy development in each of the developmental stages?

Join one of my upcoming parenting seminars to find answers to these and other parenting questions. Visit my Facebook page to find out about the next seminar.

Temperament Traits and how they influence children's behaviour

The "nature vs nurture" debate has been around for a long time. Is a child's behaviour influenced more by their genes or how they are parented? Why is it that a child's traits can be quite different from their parents’ or that one sibling's traits can be quite different from the other’s?

Every child has their individual set of natural traits or preferences for how to respond to the world around them.

What does "preferences" mean, and how do they look like? How can parents help children recognise and be proud of their natural strengths and work on potentially corresponding blindspots?

Join one of my upcoming parenting seminars to find answers to these and other parenting questions. Visit my Facebook page to find out about the next seminar.