4.5.4.1.2

4.5.4.1.2 - Speed (wadebridge)

Resource

Speed F

Speed F ANS

Speed H

Speed H ANS

Video

Fastest Land Speed - Andy Green OBE Richard Noble OBE - Guinness World Records 60th Anniversary.mp4

Resultant force

Students come up with resultant force diagram. (after force diagram)

Walk.mp4
RUN.mp4

WALK RUN

SMALL animations so pupils can estimate speed

(1.5m/s, 3m/s and cycling 6m/s)

Practical / DEMO

4.5.1.4 Resultant forces

Demo:

  • METER RULERS FOR A "SLOW RACE" AT THE END

Safety

None

4.5.1.4 Resultant forces

Content - WADEBRIDGE SLIT SPEC

Speed does not involve direction. Speed is a scalar quantity.

The speed of a moving object is rarely constant. When people walk, run or travel in a car their speed is constantly changing.

The speed at which a person can walk, run or cycle depends on many factors including: age, terrain, fitness and distance travelled.

Typical values may be taken as:

walking ̴ 1.5 m/s

running ̴ 3 m/s

cycling ̴ 6 m/s.

Students should be able to recall typical values of speed for a person walking, running and cycling as well as the typical values of speed for different types of transportation systems.

It is not only moving objects that have varying speed. The speed of sound and the speed of the wind also vary.

A typical value for the speed of sound in air is 330 m/s.


Students should be able to make measurements of distance and time and then calculate speeds of objects.

For an object moving at constant speed the distance travelled in a specific time can be calculated using the equation:

distance travelled = speed × time

s = v t

distance, s, in metres, m

speed, v, in metres per second, m/s

time, t, in seconds, s


Students should be able to calculate average speed for non-uniform motion.