Social Studies Program

All students are required to take 3 credits of social studies for graduation (World Geography, Economics, Civics, Western Civilization, and US History). Many colleges require 3-4 years of social studies courses. Listed below are suggested sequences for students. Students will have the option of changing as their academic plans change.

Required Courses:

217-WORLD GEOGRAPHY-HONORS (½ credit)

218-WORLD GEOGRAPHY-Level 1 (½ credit)

219-WORLD GEOGRAPHY (½ credit)

Students will study the earth's surface and the processes that shape it, the relationship between people and the environment, and the connections between people and places. An emphasis will be placed upon the application of the five themes of geography to the cultural parts of the Eastern Hemisphere.

Unleveled: Requires independent reading and writing skills as well as analytical response and presentations on summative assessments.

Level 1: Requires strong independent reading and writing skills as well as extended analytical response, and presentations on summative assessments.

Honors: Will encourage students with high academic skills and motivation to work independently to gain depth of understanding in the subject matter. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate knowledge and understanding through extensive research projects and presentations.


223-ECONOMICS-HONORS (½ credit)

224-ECONOMICS-Level 1 (½ credit)

225-ECONOMICS (½ credit)

In Economics, students will explore basic economic concepts and principles using economic models, simulations, and decision-making activities. An emphasis will be placed on understanding how economics affects individuals as decision-makers. The national economy and its interaction with the global economy will also be addressed.

Level 1: Requires strong independent reading and writing skills as well as extended analytical response on summatives.

Honors: Will encourage students with superior academic skills and motivation to work independently to gain depth of understanding in the subject matter. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate knowledge and understanding through extensive research projects.

Prerequisite: Sophomore; World Geography

For students to select Honors or Level 1, they need to earn a B- or better in the current Honors or Level 1 social studies course.


276-AP MACROECONOMICS

AP (1 credit)

AP Macroeconomics is a course designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics in examining aggregate economic behavior. Students taking the course can expect to learn how the measures of economic performance, such as GDP, inflation and unemployment, are constructed and how to apply them to evaluate the macroeconomic conditions of an economy. Students will also learn the basic analytical tools of macroeconomics, primarily the aggregate demand and aggregate supply model and its application in the analysis and determination of national income, as well as evaluating the effectiveness of fiscal policy and monetary policy in promoting economic growth and stability. Recognizing the global nature of economics, students will also have ample opportunities to examine the impact of international trade and international finance on national economies. Various economic schools of thought are introduced as solutions to economic problems are considered. Competencies will include: skills/content, analysis/problem solving, and communication. Students are required to take the AP exam as administered by the College Board. Test fees are the responsibility of the student.

Prerequisite: Sophomore, Junior or Senior; Algebra I

Note: This course meets the Economics graduation requirement.


226-CIVICS-HONORS (½ credit)

227-CIVICS-Level 1 (½ credit)

228-CIVICS (½ credit)

In Civics, students will focus on understanding the purpose, structure, and function of American government at the local, state, and national levels. Additional focus will be given to comparative political systems, the political process, and rights and responsibilities.

Level 1: Requires strong independent reading and writing skills as well as extended analytical response on summatives.

Honors: Will encourage students with superior academic skills and motivation to work independently to gain depth of understanding in the subject matter. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate knowledge and understanding through extensive research projects.


232-WESTERN CIVILIZATION-HONORS (½ credit)

233-WESTERN CIVILIZATION-Level 1 (½ credit)

234-WESTERN CIVILIZATION (½ credit)

Students will explore western civilization from the emergence of modern nation states to current day. The focus will be centered on the relationship between economic systems, political ideas and structures, and society/culture. Competencies will include: skills/content, analysis/problem solving, and communication.

Level 1: Requires strong independent reading and writing skills as well as extended analytical response on summatives.

Honors: Will encourage students with superior academic skills and motivation to work independently to gain depth of understanding in the subject matter. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate knowledge and understanding through extensive research projects.

Prerequisite:Sophomore; World Geography For a student to remain at the Honors or Level 1, they need to earn a B- or better in the current Honors or Level 1 social studies course.


245CC-U.S. HISTORY-COLLEGE CREDIT (1 credit)

250-U.S. HISTORY-Level 1 (1 credit)

260-U.S. HISTORY (1 credit)

United States History students develop an understanding of the dynamics of modern America. They define the causes, effects of late 19th and 20th century political, economic, and social events and trends. Students analyze and interpret primary and secondary sources, develop and defend opinions, work collaboratively, and demonstrate their learning through verbal and non-verbal expression.

Level 1: Requires strong independent reading and writing skills as well as extended analytical response on summatives.

CC: Will encourage students with superior academic skills and motivation to work independently to gain depth of understanding in the subject matter. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate knowledge and understanding through extensive research projects.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior; Western Civilization

For a student to remain at the Honors/CC or Level 1, they need to earn a B- or better in the current Honors or Level 1 social studies course.

Social Studies Elective Courses:

275-CIVIL WAR

(½ credit)

The American Civil War is one of the most divisive and important events in American history. In this course, students will analyze the coming of the war, considering the political, social, and cultural issues and attitudes which divided the Americans in both the North and the South. Students will explore the role of government, state's rights, slavery, and the fate of the Union. Sectional conflict centered on a series of questions that involved the future of African slavery, and the Southern way of life. This course attempts to briefly summarize and present the major events and battles related to the war in chronological order. This course will explore the major political issues and philosophies that set the stage for the Civil War, sustained is, and continue to the present.


278-HOLOCAUST STUDIES

(½ credit)

Explore and analyze the complex factors contributing to the Holocaust, interpret the events of 1933-1945, and evaluate the impact of the genocide on post-war Europe and generations to come. The course examines the Holocaust both chronologically and thematically. The course incorporates primary sources and many elements of psychology, sociology, ethics, and economics. Individual and group collaboration approaches for assessments.

Prerequisite: Sophomore, Junior or Senior


295-CRIMINOLOGY

(½ credit)

This course provides students with the foundations of the Criminal Justice System by placing an emphasis on the four domains of Criminology: Crime and Crime Causation, Law Enforcement, the Justice System and Institutional Corrections. The course is introduced by having students both explore the careers that are associated with the study of Criminology and self-administering a test, which matches their personality traits with potential law enforcement careers. The course concludes by addressing the issues confronting criminal justice in an age of technology and terrorism.

Prerequisite: Sophomore, Junior or Senior


287-CURRENT SOCIAL AND POLITICAL ISSUES

CC (1 credit)

This course explores current social and political issues facing the United States and the world today. Utilizing paper and electronic news media, discussion will focus on how current events are changing today’s society. Topics include will include foreign affairs and politics, civil rights and liberties, crime and punishment, economic and welfare issues, political and social reform, gender issues, racial and ethnic disharmony, ethics, and social justice. Strong independent reading and writing skills are required.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior


271-PSYCHOLOGY

(½ credit)

This course focuses on topics such as approaches to psychology, its contributors and its historical development, psychology disciplines, the structure and function of the brain, personality development, learning, emotions, stages of life, mental health, and therapies. Students will have the opportunity to explore psychology in many ways including individual projects and group activities. This course is the basis of exposure for college.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior


289-ADVANCED TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY

(½ credit)

Designed for students to further investigate a deeper understanding of psychology in their everyday life. Emphasis on developmental and social psychology including human relations, personality and abnormal psychology. Course includes using individual and collaborative approaches to evaluate contemporary topics.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior; Psychology or Psychology CC


273CC -PSYCHOLOGY – COLLEGE CREDIT

CC (1 credit)

This course focuses on topics such as approaches to psychology, its contributors and its historical development, psychology disciplines, the structure and function of the brain, personality development, learning, motivation, emotions, stress and stress management, memory, sleep and sleep cycles, dreams, altered states of consciousness, mental health, and social behavior. Students will have the opportunity to explore psychology through many ways including individual projects and group activities. Students who sign up for Psychology College Credit are required to apply for college credit through the Community College System of New Hampshire. Strong independent reading and writing skills are required.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior


284-SOCIOLOGY

(½ credit)

This course examines the social world, using the study of social interactions. With focus on culture and human interaction, students will learn how to connect research to concepts, through the study of social customs, social norms and social institutions. This course will examine the connections among the individual, social groups and social institutions with a focus on issues, such as gender, race, crime, and class struggles. Students will learn how to connect research to concepts, and develop critical thinking skills, deepening their understanding of the social world.

Prerequisite: Sophomore, Junior or Senior


280-US GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

CC (1 credit)

Are you interested in what is going on in our nation’s capital? Do you want to understand more about how our government works and who is able to influence it? Do current political beliefs and behaviors in Washington D.C. matter? Have you thought about what you can to do influence our current leaders? This course examines the relationship between government, politics, and power. Students discuss how people in a democracy can effect change in government to address current and future needs. Topics include political beliefs and behavior, political parties, interest groups, mass media, civil rights, civil liberties, etc. Strong independent reading and writing skills are required.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior; Civics