English Program

All students are required to take 4 credits of English for graduation (Freshman English, Sophomore English and 2 credits of elective English). An English class must be taken each year of high school. Listed below are suggested sequences for students. Students will have the option of changing as their academic plans change.

100-FRESHMAN ENGLISH-HONORS (1 credit)

110-FRESHMAN ENGLISH-Level 1 (1 credit)

120-FRESHMAN ENGLISH (1 credit)

Honors is strongly recommended if considering AP Literature & Composition.

Students develop a working knowledge of the use of language. Students expand their vocabulary and develop their speaking, listening, and writing skills. The students critically read, view, and interpret short stories, novels, plays, and nonfiction selections. Students are expected to develop comprehension skills through independent reading. Outside/summer reading requirements must be met in order for students to complete MLA reading/writing activities within the first weeks of class.


122-INTRODUCTION TO WRITING

(½ credit)

Incoming students develop their essay writing ability by improving their grammar, mechanics, and word choice skills. They extend their writing opportunity by using all steps of the writing process from prewriting to publishing. Students will practice writing skills applicable across the curriculum. Specific skills will include applying MLA formatting, developing thesis statements supported by evidence, introducing and concluding essays, developing unified paragraphs, and expressing an original voice while avoiding plagiarism. This course is required for all freshmen.


125-SOPHOMORE ENGLISH-HONORS (1 credit)

130-SOPHOMORE ENGLISH-Level 1 (1 credit)

140-SOPHOMORE ENGLISH (1 credit)

Honors is strongly recommended if considering AP Literature & Composition.

Students study grammar, composition, and literature. They apply grammar usage concepts in written and oral assignments and learn to write a formal essay and a research paper. They read and analyze novels as well as works of nonfiction, poetry, mythology and drama. They also do vocabulary units. They learn study skill techniques for reading, note taking, and test taking. Outside/summer reading requirements must be met in order for students to complete MLA reading/writing activities within the first weeks of class.

Prerequisite: Freshman English

For a student to select Honors or Level 1, they need to earn a B- or better in the current Honors or L1 English course.


155-AMERICAN LITERATURE CLASSICS

CC (1 credit)

American Literature that focuses on the classics requires students to read notable works throughout American history in the various genres: short story, novel, poetry, drama, and essay. Students read both fictional and nonfiction works written by authors from the United States. Students analyze the importance of the readings and reflect on specific issues and literary trends. They learn by reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing print sources, the arts, and media. Students expand vocabulary skills. Students also explore the college application process. Outside/summer reading requirements must be met in order for students to complete MLA reading/writing activities within the first weeks of class. This course is recommended for any students interested in taking AP Literature and Composition.

Prerequisite: Sophomore English - For students to select CC, they need to earn a B- or better in a current Level 1 English course.


156-AMERICAN LITERATURE CONTEMPORARIES-Level 1 (1 credit)

157-AMERICAN LITERATURE CONTEMPORARIES (1 credit)

American Literature Contemporaries requires students to read notable, contemporary American works in the various genres: short story, novel, poetry, drama, and essay. Students read both fictional and nonfiction works written by authors from the United States. Students analyze the importance of the readings and reflect on specific issues and literary trends. They learn by reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing print sources, the arts, and media. Students expand vocabulary skills. Students also explore the college application process. Outside/summer reading requirements must be met in order for students to complete MLA reading/writing activities within the first weeks of class.

Prerequisite: Sophomore English

For a student to select Level 1, they need to earn an B- or better in a current Level 1 English course.


186-WORLD LITERATURE CLASSICS

Honors (1 credit)

World Literature that focuses on the classics requires students to read notable works throughout the centuries in the various genres: short story, novel, poetry, epic, drama, and essay. Students read both fictional and nonfiction works written by authors from countries other than the United States. Students analyze the importance of the readings and their influence on modern retellings. They connect ancient classic literature to contemporary literature. They learn by reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing print sources, the arts, and media. Outside/summer reading requirements must be met in order for students to complete MLA reading/writing activities within the first weeks of class.

Prerequisite: American Literature Classics, American Literature Contemporaries L1

For students to select the Honors level, they need to earn a B- or better in the current L1, Honors or College Credit English course.


166-WORLD LITERATURE CONTEMPORARIES I-Level 1 (½ credit)

167-WORLD LITERATURE CONTEMPORARIES I (½ credit)

World Literature Contemporaries emphasizes the themes prevalent in works characteristic of different countries. In fictional and nonfiction works, students learn how authors reflect the times, ideas, and social issues of the period. Students analyze world literature by reading, writing, speaking, listening, and critical viewing. Students expand vocabulary and writing skills.

Prerequisite: Senior

For a student to select Level 1, they need to earn a B- or better in the current Level 1 English course.


168-WORLD LITERATURE CONTEMPORARIES II-Level 1 (½ credit)

169-WORLD LITERATURE CONTEMPORARIES II (½ credit)

World Literature Contemporaries emphasizes the themes prevalent in works characteristic of different countries. In fictional and nonfiction works, students learn how authors reflect the times, ideas, and social issues of the period. Students analyze world literature by reading, writing, speaking, listening, and critical viewing. Students expand vocabulary and writing skills.

Prerequisite: Senior; World Literature Contemporaries I

For a student to select Level 1, they need to earn a B- or better in the current Level 1 course.


183-AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION

AP (1 credit)

The AP Literature and Composition course engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. The course includes intensive study of representative works from various genres and periods, concentrating on works of recognized literary merit from the sixteenth to the twenty-first century. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. The writing assignments focus on the critical analysis of literature and include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays (APcentral.collegeboard.com). Students will be able to take the AP Literature and Composition exam as administered by College Board. Test fees are the responsibility of the student. Students must meet all AP reading requirements, including outside reading assignments.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior; American Literature Classics or American Literature Contemporaries L1 or World Literature Classics or World Literature Contemporaries II L1; may be taken concurrently. For a student to take this course, they need to earn a B- or better in Sophomore English Honors or Level 1.


129-HEROES AND VILLAINS-L1 (½ credit)

131-HEROES AND VILLAINS - (½ credit)

Students study the characteristics of heroes and villains from the Classical Age to modern media. They take into consideration what the creator of the character had in mind, what circumstances affected this person’s actions, and what culture or society produced this character. They discuss how their own principles, prejudices, and associations influence people’s perceptions. They read stories that seem to have an obvious hero and an obvious villain and learn how character development, sentiment, and tone can blur the line between hero and villain.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior; Sophomore English


132-BEST SHORTS

(½ credit)

Students have the opportunity to read short writings in prose, poetry, drama, and media. They read great short pieces of literature and participate in class discussions of students’ writing. They study societal issues and events portrayed through centuries of global media. They read, write, think, and discuss critically the material covered in class.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior; Sophomore English


124-FILM ANALYSIS

(½ credit)

Students will learn about the formal elements of film (narrative, mise-en-scene, cinematography, sound and editing). Students will watch a variety of films, from Classic Hollywood to modern blockbusters, writing analysis essays and examining how the medium of film differs from that of literature. A strong emphasis on writing, reading, and visual analysis will be evaluated.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior


136-ORAL COMMUNICATION I (½ credit)

137-ORAL COMMUNICATION II (½ credit)

Students prepare to assume an active part in those phases of industrial and social life requiring effective oral communication. They improve skills in public speaking, self-confidence, and self-awareness. Students learn to speak clearly and pointedly, and to plan and organize thought before delivery. Along with formal and impromptu speechmaking, students critically analyze, research, and argue topics of interest. Please Note: Students who wish to take Oral Communication for a second time, must select Course #137.

Prerequisite: Oral Communication I is required for Oral Communication II


152-MEDIA LITERACY

(½ credit)

This course will provide a 21st century look at the media of American culture and the cultures in the rest of the world. It will provide a critical lens through which to view all forms of media, including those in print, on video, and web-based. Through this class, students will learn the skills necessary to evaluate and closely analyze ideas on social media, objectively critique advertisements for possible hidden meaning and propaganda, and learn how to produce valid creations of their own that are both meaningful and timely to members of a democratic nation.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior; Into to Writing or Essay Writing


123-ESSAY WRITING

(½ credit)

Students develop their essay writing ability by improving their grammar, mechanics, and word choice skills. They extend their writing opportunities by using the writing process and word processing. Students develop a variety of essays, including narration, description, cause/effect, comparison/contrast, and persuasion. Students can conference on essays from other content areas.

Prerequisite: Freshman English or Introduction to Writing


147-CREATIVE WRITING

CC (1 credit)

Students develop their skills in writing poetry, prose, fiction, and drama, while working on specific exercises in a supportive critical environment. Because of the strong emphasis on peer editing, students must be mature enough to give and receive constructive criticism regarding sensitive, often personal, work. Some exercises Lexpose students to the protocols, as well as the problems associated with particular genres of writing; others assist the writer in mastering specific writing skills. Students read texts by various published authors for instructional support. Grammar and punctuation skills are reinforced as needed. Summer writing requirements must be met.

Prerequisite: Sophomore, Junior or Senior; Essay Writing


151-COLLEGE COMPOSITION

CC (1 credit)

Students develop a mastery of the writing process, particularly an ability to reconsider and revise their own work. Students practice writing effectively for college courses across the curriculum areas and for their own personal and professional lives. Students practice narrative, informational, argumentative, and research writing. They review Standard English grammar and MLA documentation. They also learn how to use the APA style guide. The writing assignments include SAT writing samples, college application and scholarship essays, college writing assignments, and a persuasive research paper.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior; Essay Writing


189-FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION

CC (1 credit)

High school juniors and seniors explore the art of teaching through classroom-based lessons coupled with school-to-career activities. Students examine the philosophical, historical, legal, and social/cultural aspects of education in the United States. Students formulate a beginning philosophy of education and “practice teach” a sample lesson plan. They keep a reflective journal and portfolio to document their level of progress and examine resources needed to become highly qualified teachers. They will participate in classroom observations. The course content will set a foundation for a career in education. This course does not meet English credit requirements for graduation.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior; Essay Writing


148-YEARBOOK

(1 credit)

The yearbook course takes students through the production process of the school yearbook. Students learn the fundamentals involved in creating a yearbook, layout, copy, photography, advertising, and marketing. Students also learn to organize and design layouts on the computer and submit the pages to meet production deadlines. Yearbook deadlines are crucial and students learn to work with others in a responsible, timely, and cooperative way. Students are required to attend work sessions outside of regular class hours and are responsible for the production of the PHS Yearbook. A sample of a photo journal and an interview may be requested. A student may repeat the course for elective credit. This course does NOT meet the English graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: Sophomore, Junior or Senior; Essay Writing or Digital Photography


159-ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS

Level 1 (½ credit)

In this course, students will embark on a semester long inquiry based research assignment, allowing students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, issue, or idea of individual interest. Students will design, plan, and implement their investigation to address a research question. Through this inquiry they will further develop research skills, utilize the information search process (Carol Kuhlthau), and understand the legal and ethical uses of information including economic and social issues that affect that use. Students will synthesize the information landscape of the 20th and 21st centuries to reflect upon how it impacts their life. Sample of research from another course and interview may be requested. This course does NOT meet the English graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: Freshman English, Sophomore English.