Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft (MPG) 🇩🇪

The Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology belong to the Max Planck Society, an independent non-profit research organization dedicated to top level fundamental research. The Max Planck Society (Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, MPG) is one of the leading non-university research organisations in Germany and Europe. The currently 84 Max Planck Institutes and facilities conduct basic research in the service of the general public in the natural sciences, life sciences, social sciences, and the humanities. As of December 31, 2016, the Max Planck Society employed a total of 22,995 staff, of whom 14,036 were scientists, which represents nearly 61 percent of the total number of employees.

The Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) in Munich-Martinsried was founded in 1973 as the successor of three formerly independent institutes. MPIB is a leading international research institution in the fields of biochemistry, molecular biology, and cell biology. It is part of the local life science campus in Martinsried, where two Max Planck Institutes (for Biochemistry and Neurobiology), the Helmholtz Center (former GSF Research Center for Environment and Health), the Gene Center, the faculties of medicine, biology and chemistry of the Ludwig Maximilian's University, and several biotech companies are located in close proximity. roteins are the molecular building blocks and engines of the cell, and are involved in almost all processes of life. The scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) investigate the structure of proteins and how they function – from individual molecules up to whole organisms. With about 850 employees coming from 45 nations, the MPIB is one of the largest institutes within the Max Planck Society.

The Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, was founded in 1997. The institute's aim has been to investigate the history of humankind with the help of comparative analyses of different genes, cultures, cognitive abilities and social systems of past and present human populations as well as those of primates closely related to human beings. The collaboration of the various departments at one institute is designed to lead to new insights into history, variety and abilities of the human species. The Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology unites scientists with various backgrounds (natural sciences and humanities) whose aim is to investigate the history of humankind from an interdisciplinary perspective with the help of comparative analyses of genes, cultures, cognitive abilities and social systems of past and present human populations as well as those of primates closely related to human beings.

Jürgen Cox 🇩🇪

Professor Jürgen Cox is Independent Research Group Leader of Computational Systems Biochemistry Group at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry. He is an Honorary Professor of Proteomics at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Past positions include Senior Scientist at the MPI of Biochemistry, Martinsried, Germany (2006-14), Senior Scientific Consultant and Algorithm Developer, Genedata, Martinsried, Germany (2004-2006), Postdoctoral Researcher at Technical University of Munich, Institute for Genome-Oriented Bioinformatics, Freising, Germany (2003-2004), and Scientific Consultant and Algorithm Developer, Genedata, Martinsried, Germany (2001-2003). Ph.D. in Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA (2001) Diploma in Physics (equivalent to Master’s Degree), RWTH Aachen University, Germany (1997).

Jean-Jacques Hublin 🇫🇷

Professor Jean-Jacques Hublin is the Director of the Department of Human Evolution at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig. He is an honorary Professor at the University of Leipzig and a part-time Professor at Leiden University. He holds the International Chair in Palaeoanthropology at the College de France, Paris. Past positions include: researcher at the CNRS (1981-2000), Professor at the University of Bordeaux (1999-2004), Visiting Professor at the University of California at Berkeley (1992), Harvard University (1997) and Stanford University (1999 and 2011) and Deputy Director for Anthropology, Prehistory and Palaeo-environmental Sciences at the CNRS (2000-2003).