Fabiana Di Gianvincenzo (UCPH)

About Fabiana

Born and raised in Italy, I started studying chemistry when I found out there was a connection between analytical chemistry and art. Since then, my studies have always been aimed at learning and improving the application of analytical techniques to the diagnostics for conservation and restoration of cultural heritage materials. Both my BSc and MSc theses were focused on the application of chromatographic and mass spectrometric techniques for the characterisation of organic artistic materials, in particular tannin-based dyes and modern oil paints.

During this PhD, my main goals are getting a deep knowledge of proteomics experimental techniques, and acquiring a good management capability of data analysis. I think my knowledge in chemistry and art conservation fields will be extremely helpful during the training phases for sample treatment and the interpretation of the results.

Read about Fabiana's PhD project.

CV

2014-2017 Master’s Degree, Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, University of Pisa, Italy

Thesis topic: The degradation of modern oil paintings: a multi-analytical study of ageing phenomena

2016 Erasmus+ experience, Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2010-2014 Bachelor’s Degree, Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, University of Pisa, Italy

Thesis topic: Study of the composition and degradation of tannin-based colorants and their identification in historical samples through HPLC/DAD technique and RP-Amide column

Publications

Fabiana Di Gianvincenzo, Clara Granzotto, Enrico Cappellini, Mass spectrometry-based analysis of ancient protein residues from archaeological skin, furs and textiles, in “The Textile Revolution in Bronze Age Europe”, forthcoming

Meaghan Mackie, Patrick Rüther, Diana Samodova, Fabiana Di Gianvincenzo, Clara Granzotto, David Lyon, David Peggie, Helen Howard, Lynne Harrison, Lars Juhl Jensen, Jesper V. Olsen, and Enrico Cappellini, (2018), Palaeoproteomic Profiling of Conservation Layers on a 14th Century Italian Wall Painting. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. doi: 10.1002/anie.201713020

At: University of Copenhagen

Supervisor: Enrico Cappellini

Photo credits: Fabiana Di Gianvincenzo