Copenhagen

Natural History Musem of Denmark

Founded in 1479, UC is the oldest and second largest university in Denmark, and hosts over 37,000 students and 7,000 employees. A member of the International Alliance of Research Universities, its research and training expertise span the full range of academic disciplines. Founded recently as a merger of UC’s different museums, the Natural History Museum is the largest academic museum in Denmark. Holding 7 distinct research sections, it is also home of the Basic Research Centre for GeoGenetics (CGG). Built around 5 distinct research groups with expertise spanning geology to genomics, CGG provides an exceptionally dynamic research environment, and is perhaps the world’s leading institute for the application of ancient genomic techniques across a wide range of archaeological, anthropological and evolutionary biological questions.

Tom Gilbert

Email: tgilbert@snm.ku.dk

Phone (Direct): +45 23 71 25 19

Scholar: [Papers in Google Scholar]

Group Page: [Centre for Geogenetics]

Tom is Professor of Palaeogenomics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark. With formal training in Biology, during his PhD he focussed on the the methods and application of ancient DNA as a tool for archaeological, anthropological, and evolutionary biology studies. His research today draws on the latest developments in ancient and modern genomics, metagenomics, proteomics and archaeological sciences, in order to tackle questions spanning the full spectra of archaeological and biosciences.

Ludovic Orlando

Email: lorlando@snm.ku.dk

Phone (Direct): +45 21 84 96 46

Scholar: [Papers in Google Scholar]

Group Page: [Centre for Geogenetics]

Ludovic received his Ph.D. in molecular genetics from the University of Lyon, France, 20 years after the first ancient DNA molecule was sequenced. He opened his laboratory in 2010 at the Centre of Excellence in GeoGenetics at Copenhagen University, Denmark, focusing on the development of innovative molecular and computational methods tailored to the analysis of ancient genomes. His recent work includes the characterization of the oldest mammalian genome and the construction of the first ancient epigenomes. He is also reconstructing the genomes of ancient horses, spanning different stages of the domestication process to better understand the origins of the modern horse. He is now proposing to use fossilized shells as a new reservoir of ancient DNA.

Morten Tange Olsen

Email: morten.olsen@snm.ku.dk

Phone (Direct): +45 42 66 15 25

Web page: [web page]

Scholar: [Papers in Google Scholar]

Researchgate: [Research Gate Page]

Group Page: [Centre for Geogenetics]

Morten Tange Olsen is Assistant Professor and Curator of Marine Mammals at the Natural History Museum of Denmark. His research interests lie in understanding the patterns and processes governing wildlife abundance and distribution with a particular focus on applying genetic and ecological methods in the study of marine mammals, but also terrestrial mammals, birds, fish and pathogens.

Enrico Cappellini

Email: ecappellini@snm.ku.dk

Phone (Office): +45 35 32 13 38

Scholar: [Papers in Google Scholar]

Group Page: [Centre for Geogenetics]

Enrico is Assistant Professor at the Natural History Museum of Denmark. His work is focused on development and application of genomics and proteomics methods dedicated to ancient and degraded DNA and proteins. He achieved major breakthroughs in ancient protein research, such as the reconstruction of the first and the most ancient proteome. By integrating metagenomics and proteomics approaches, he lead the first high-resolution reconstruction of an ancient oral microbiome and the first observation of the ancient immune response proteins and proteic virulence factors from archaeological dental calculus.

Anders Johannes Hansen

Email: AJHansen@snm.ku.dk

Phone (Direct): +45 28 75 61 34

Scholar: [Papers in Google Scholar]

Group Page: [Centre for Geogenetics]

As one of the PI’s of the Centre for GeoGenetics, Anders J. Hansen (AJH) has extensive experience working with characterization of genetic material in difficult samples either being aDNA, eDNA, forensic genetics or degraded DNA. AJH was one for the first to use DNA technology to characterize species contents in ancient environmental samples like ice and permafrost. Currently AJH’s research interests predominant focus on genetic identification and discovery by genomic and metagenomic analysis of DNA and RNA in complex tissue samples with the aim of describing the population genetics, regulation and distribution of genes, microbial composition, phage’s, viruses and more.

Hannes Schroeder

Email: hschroeder@snm.ku.dk

Phone (Direct): +45 42 52 36 14

Hannes is Assistant Professor at the Natural History Museum in Copenhagen, Denmark. Trained at UCL and the University of Oxford, he has a broad background in archaeological science, including osteoarchaeology, isotope analysis, and ancient DNA. His current research interests center primarily on questions relating to human migrations in the past and the development and application of new analytical techniques in ancient DNA. He has also had a long-standing interest in European prehistory and the archaeology of human remains.

Mikkel Sinding

Email: mikkel.sinding@snm.ku.dk

Phone (Direct): +45 29 66 83 55

Scholar: [Papers in Google Scholar]

Group Page: [Centre for Geogenetics]

Mikkel Sinding is a research PhD student shared between Natural History Museum of Denmark and Natural History Museum at the University of Oslo. The majority of his research focuses on temporal population genomics of Greenlandic wolves and Inuit sledge dogs. He is broadly interested in history of life, evolution, ecology, environment change, human impacts, domestication, extinction, de-extinction and re-wilding. He has a background in ancient DNA, population genetics and several types of fieldwork, in relation to this he is involved in additional projects concerning, marine mammals, canines, bovids and bioarchaeology.

Mikkel Sørensen

Email: miksr@hum.ku.dk

Phone: (+45) 51298848/ 60740407

Group page: http://saxo.ku.dk/ansatte/forhistoriskarkaeologi/

Mikkel Sørensen is Associate Professor at the Saxo Institute, department of Archaeology, University of Copenhagen. His work is focused on Prehistoric hunter-gatherer societies of northern Europe and the eastern Arctic, Climate change research in human science, Prehistoric Lithic Technology and the Chaine operatorie methodology. In his phd work he introduced new methodologies to the study of palaeo-inuit cultures of the eastern Arctic and was thereby able to contribute vitally to the present understanding of Greenlands early Prehistory. He has during the last years been part of a team that have conducted archaeological surveys and courses in the Holmegårds Mose, known for its famous preservation of Palaeolithic and Mesolithic cultural remains.

Cecilie Toudal Pedersen

Email: cecilietoudal@palaeome.org

Phone: +(45) 35321308

Cecilie is Project Manager for ArchSci2020 based at University of Copenhagen. She is responsible for the coordination of workshops between partners and the administration, communication, reporting to the EU as well as dealing with the financial aspects of the project. Along this project she works as special consultant for a research group at the Natural History Museum of Denmark, UCPH.