Mr. Clark's Math Club Cohort

Who can master the "bricks" questions (1 of 3)?

John has a sack of red, black and white toy bricks. If he had 12 more red bricks than white bricks and 15 fewer white than black bricks, what is the positive difference of the number of red and black bricks in John's sack?

Please show your work and email your responses to richard.clark@nn.k12.va.us

Who can master the "bricks" questions (2 of 3)?

John thought of giving his friends his toy bricks. Using the information in the first part of the bricks question, John had 117 red, white and black toy bricks in his sack. What is the maximum number of friends John could split up the bricks with so that all of the colors are distributed evenly with none left over.

Please show your work and email your responses to richard.clark@nn.k12.va.us

Who can master the "bricks" questions (3 of 3)?

John decided to share his toy bricks with his brother, Eddy. John picks one brick out of the sack and gives it to Eddy, then randomly selects another brick from the bag without replacement , and keeps it for himself. John keeps the random selection and distribution process until they both have the same number of bricks and one remains in the sack. If John started with 117 bricks, what is the probability that the last brick is black? Express your answer as a common fraction.

Please show your work and email your responses to richard.clark@nn.k12.va.us