What's Happening This Month

Showing in January

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Legends of the Night Sky: Perseus and Andromeda Hear the Greek mythology surrounding several well-known constellations: Perseus, Andromeda, Cepheus, Cassiopeia, Cetus, and more. Andromeda, a beautiful princess, finds herself in harm’s way as a result of her parents’ foolishness. Can the demigod, Perseus, save her in time? Find out in this humorous animated program, which is fun for the whole family!

Run Time: 20 minutes

Recommended for ages 6 and up

Legends of the Night Sky:

Perseus and Andromeda

Showing the Month of January

4 pm Tuesday - Friday


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Atlas of a Changing Earth explores how images from space are shedding new light on our planets evolution in the wake of rising global temperatures. Taking viewers into the dynamic processes that cause coastal glaciers to melt and explores how rising seas could threaten coastlines around the world. Satellite imagery is being used to map every square meter of the planet, providing a highly detailed view of remote areas of the world like Antarctica and Greenland.

Run time: 24 minutes Recommended for ages 12

Atlas of a Changing Earth - Trailer

Atlas of a Changing Earth

Showing the Month of January

7 pm Saturdays

We will be closed Saturday, January 1st, for the New Year's Holiday

Astronomical Events Happening in January

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Jan 3, 4 Quadrantids Meteor Shower. An above average shower, with up to 40 meteors per hour at its peak. Thought to be produced by dust grains left behind by an extinct comet known as 2003 EH1, which was discovered in 2003. The shower runs annually from January 1-5, peaking on the night of the 3rd and morning of the 4th. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Bootes but can appear anywhere in the sky.


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January 7 – Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky. Look for the planet in the western sky just after sunset.

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January 17 – Full Moon. A full moon occurs when one side of the moon is fully illuminated from our perspective on Earth. The sun, earth, and moon are lined up, with the earth in the middle. This positioning allows full illumination because the rays of the sun are fully and directly hitting the moon from an Earth perspective.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Wolf Moon because this was the time of year when hungry wolf pack howled outside their camps. This moon has also been known as the Old Moon and the Moon After Yule.


January

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Coming in February

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While attending a local star party, two teenage students learn how the telescope has helped us understand our place in space and how telescopes continue to expand our understanding of the Universe. Their conversation with a local female astronomer enlightens them on the history of the telescope and the discoveries these wonderful tools have made. The students see how telescopes work and how the largest observatories in the world use these instruments to explore the mysteries of the universe.

Run Time: 25 minutes Recommended for ages 8 and up.


Two Small Pieces of Glass

Showing the Month of February

4 pm Tuesday - Friday



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Cosmic Origins Spectrograph The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph was the last instrument added to the Hubble Space Telescope in 2009. This program discusses how the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph analyzes visible and invisible light of the cosmos and explores the hidden large-scale structure of the universe to understand the origins of galaxies, stars, and planets.

Run Time: 30 minutes Recommended for ages 8 and up.

Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

Showing the Month of February

7 pm Saturdays