By the early 1840's bat and ball games were firmly entrenched into the fabric of American society. Young men of the time preferred base ball over cricket for the speed of the game and to further distance themselves from their "forefathers" generation. Americans were excited to have a game of their "own" and officially adopted a set of playing rules in September of 1845. These playing rules marked the first time any group had attempted to "officially" set down universal laws for matches. It led to what would be called "The New York Game." Nine clubs would begin to informally schedule matches for the following spring. While it was agreed to report scores and keep standings, no effort was made to create a balanced schedule. Clubs were free to schedule games whenever they felt they would have enough participants to field a side. This is a truly amateur league, where club members pay dues and hold outside employment within their communities and cannot be expected to follow a rigorous match schedule. It is hard to imagine that these men had any idea that playing a children's game would evolve into something much bigger. Let our story begin......

With knowledge of what was happening in the state of New York, Massachusetts was close behind in creating their own set of uniform playing rules. By 1850, four Boston clubs led by Alfred Cannon had solidified a set of rules that were close to how the New York clubs operated, but they still maintained it's own unique identity. Cannon, an avid fan of competitive matches, dreamed of having a large set of clubs playing a set schedule. At this point, such thoughts were still works in progress.

As popularity of the game spreads during the early 1850's the city of Philadelphia enters into the fray. Residents of one of the oldest and most important cities in America have always displayed a healthy appreciation for organized games. Once a popular center for the game of cricket and town ball, interest has shifted to the game of base ball. The city would feature four teams that have chosen to shake their earlier bat and ball game roots and play base ball exclusively.