Newsletter 2020

First Half of 2020

No headway in 7 Provinces of the Sea Zoning Regulations

(June 23, 2020) Total of 24 provinces have completed and ratified Regional Regulations on Zoning Plans for Coastal Areas and Small Islands (RZWP3K). Of these, the last three provinces have endorsed the past three months. The last province that was able to legalize it was Aceh which stipulated Qanun Number 1 of 2020 concerning RZWP3K of 2020-2040 and was established on 17 April 2020. The remaining seven provinces that are still carrying out the process of drafting the final RZWP3K document are targeted to be able to complete the process and endorse becoming a Regional Regulation in 2020. For this reason, support from the Central and Regional Governments is needed to pursue this target.

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/06/23/pengaturan-zonasi-laut-tujuh-provinsi-masih-abu-abu/ ]

Arctic Ocean Acidification Is Expected To Get Worse, Threatening Entire Food Chains

(June 25, 2020) Acidification in the Arctic Ocean is anticipated to be worse than previously expected due to a greater uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2), new research suggests. This increase in CO2 causes the frigid northern waters to become more acidic, which can ultimately lead to the decay of hard-shelled marine animals like mussels and “sea butterflies”. In the Arctic Ocean, acidification is expected to have the greatest impact, finds research published in Nature. To come to their conclusions, researchers from the University of Bern employed current climate models to simulate how Arctic deep-water formation and “carbon inventory” will change based on models of surface water.

[Read full contents: https://nationalgeographic.grid.id/read/132213002/pengasaman-laut-arktika-semakin-buruk-dan-mengancam-rantai-makanan]

Nearly A Fifth Of World's Ocean Floor Mapped In Seabed

(June 24, 2020) The Nippon Foundation-GEBCO Seabed 2030 Project has announced that nearly a fifth of the world’s entire ocean floor has now been mapped. An impressive 14.5 million square kilometres of new bathymetric data has now been included in the latest GEBCO Grid, an area twice the size of Australia. Coverage of the seabed has risen from 15% to 19% in the last year. When Seabed 2030 was launched in 2017 with the goal of mapping the entire ocean floor by 2030, only 6% of the oceans had been mapped to modern standards. “The sustained increase in data available to map the ocean floor will enable Seabed 2030 to play a leading role in delivering a comprehensive set of authoritative data that is freely available for all to use,” said Jamie McMichael-Phillips, Seabed 2030 Project Director. The plan to complete a comprehensive map of the world’s oceans has gathered significant momentum since in the past three years, and the Seabed 2030 now has the support of more than 100 international organisations. The project now has 133 official partners, contributors and supporters – and continues to seek out new collaborations in technical innovation and data collection.

[Read full contents:https://www.kompas.com/sains/read/2020/06/24/172557723/misi-pemetaan-dasar-laut-bumi-seperlima-lautan-dunia-telah-dipetakan?page=all

Scientists Test Plastic Kept Deep Underwater Over 20 Years

(June 22, 2020) Even after more than 20 years in the ocean, everyday plastics can show very few signs of breaking up or degrading, according to a new study examining the effects of deep-sea submersion on this problematic material. Researchers looked at two plastic samples recovered from 4,150 metres (13,615 feet) below the surface of the eastern Pacific Ocean, finding that the majority of the plastic was still fully intact, and had also influenced microbial communities growing on the plastic surface.

[Read full contents:https://www.kompas.com/sains/read/2020/06/22/130300723/peneliti-temukan-plastik-bertahan-lebih-dari-20-tahun-di-dasar-laut?page=all ]

Pollution Declines In Seas Off Indonesia During Lockdown

(June 18, 2020) Pollution from human and tourist waste spilling into the seas off Indonesia has decreased during Italy's coronavirus lockdown according to Akbar Reza, Lecturer in the Faculty of Biology at Gajjah Mada University. He explained that during the Covid-19 pandemic there were no more crowds of tourists in various water tourism objects in the country. This has a very positive effect on the condition of the sea and the ecosystems in it. "Pressure from tourist activity has been greatly reduced during the pandemic," he said. Even so, he said the Covid-19 pandemic also had a negative impact on the maritime sector. One of them resulted in a decrease in income from fisheries activities, especially small scale. "During this pandemic there was a tendency for an increase in medical waste. Many gloves and masks are found on the beaches of a number of countries," he explained. Another negative impact is an increase in illegal fishing in some areas such as Natuna and Raja Ampat.

[Read full contents: https://fin.co.id/2020/06/22/polusi-laut-menurun-kargo-ikutan-anjlok/]

Google Maps Caught Presumed Shipwrecks in Sukabumi

(June 20, 2020) Sukabumi netizens are again excited by posting Google satellite map images that capture objects similar to ships, sinking (sinking) not far from the coast of Cikembang Beach in Pasirbaru Village, Cisolok District, Sukabumi Regency, West Java Province. It is Akbar Alfiana N's account who posted these pictures to the sukabumifacebook group on June 20, 2020.

[Read full contents: https://sukabumiupdate.com/detail/ototekno/iptek/71297-Tertangkap-Google-Maps-Heboh-Benda-Mirip-Kapal-Karam-di-Perairan-Cisolok-Sukabumi ]

Minister Edhy Boosts the Productivity of Marine Fisheries

(June 18, 2020) Minister of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries Edhy Prabowo continues to work to boost the productivity of Indonesian Marine Fisheries by optimizing all marine potential in this country through various programs that directly touch the public. "As is well known, Indonesia is surrounded by oceans which have a potential of capable Marine Fisheries, but this potential has not been maximally utilized, especially by the community. KKP continue to work to optimize the existing marine potential," he said in Sukabumi on Wednesday June 17, 2020.

[Read full contents: https://akurat.co/ekonomi/id-1143373-read-gaya-menteri-edhy-genjot-produktivitas-perikanan-laut-tanah-air ]

Coronavirus PPE is starting to pollute our oceans

(June 18, 2020) As the COVID-19 crisis slowly generates a new kind of waste, made up of disposable masks and other PPE items, it’s posing new problems for the Earth’s oceans. The flood of PPE could cause immediate danger to wildlife and long-term plastic pollution that threatens to contaminate food supplies. The Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) research team conducted a study in two river mouths in Jakarta during the Covid-19 pandemic, namely in Cilincing and Marunda, North Jakarta, which found that the amount of waste experienced a slight increase, but the weight of the waste was reduced. One member of the LIPI research team, Intan Suci Nurhati, said before the waste pandemic that many types of plastic were found. "during this pandemic there is a new category that in 2016 does not exist, it is PPE," said the researcher from the LIPI Oceanographic Research Center in an online discussion organized by Greenpeace Indonesia in Jakarta, Thursday (6/18).

[Read full contents: https://republika.co.id/berita/qc4ibo328/ketika-laut-jakarta-dipenuhi-sampah-apd ]

World Ocean Day: Driving Innovation in Marine Management in Indonesia

(June 11, 2020) The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic made the commemoration of World Ocean Day and the Coral Triangle 2020 finally be held not at sea. A number of parties in the marine spatial management network in Indonesia who discussed current policies and governance of the world's coral triangle. The Coral Triangle covers areas within six countries – Indonesia, Philippines, Malaysia, Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea and Timor-Leste. It is shaped like a triangle because scientists have identified that these are the boundaries that delineate the epicenter of marine biodiversity on Planet Earth. Aryo Hanggono, Director General of Indonesia's Marine Spatial Management of the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries delivered message for commemorate World Ocean Day and World Triangle Day. In his remarks, Aryo said that this was the first time that maritime day celebrations such as World Ocean Day and the Coral Triangle were carried out online in the impact of the global Covid-19 pandemic.

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/06/11/hari-laut-sedunia-mendorong-inovasi-pengelolaan-laut-di-indonesia/ ]

NTT Province Urge to Authorities to Protect Ocean

(June 8, 2020) East Nusa Tenggara Province as one of the Islands Province in Indonesia, has a sea area of ​​± 200,000 Km2 outside the Indonesian Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). With a vast expanse of ocean which is four times the size of the land, making the NTT sea rich in potential marine resources. The NTT Sea is home to 500 species of coral reefs, 300 species of fish and 3 species of turtles. NTT mainstay marine resources are fishery, seaweed and salt. In commemoration of world Oceans day onJune 8, 2020, WALHI NTT urges the government to: Provide consistent environmental law enforcement in protecting the sea, Provide conservation education and environmental law to fishermen and coastal communities, Prohibit any ship or passenger ship to dispose of trash in the sea, Establish BKSDA in every island in NTT, Increase the budget for marine conservation, especially the protection of fishermen and coastal communities.

[Read full contents: https://radarntt.co/daerah/2020/walhi-laut-ntt-terancam-pemerintah-lamban-melindungi/ ]

IPB University Delivered Lecture through Live Instagram

(June 8, 2020) The Department of Marine Science and Technology (ITK), the Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences (FPIK), IPB University routinely holds The Ocean Voice through Live Instagram at @ itk.ipb. The theme raised in this first episode was "Building International Quality Marine Education" with the guest star presented was Dr. Ir I Wayan Nurjaya, MSc as Chair of the ITK Department. Through this event Dr. I Wayan explained that the Department of ITK IPB University became the first marine department to carry out international accreditation through the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST). The ITK Department has had fully accredited International standards starting in 2013, after earlier history noted that the ITK Department was also one of the first marine study programs opened in Indonesia. "International accreditation for the ITK Department is important. The benefit is being able to collaborate with universities that have maritime affairs abroad to share knowledge and improve the quality of their marine resources, "he explained. In addition, the ITK Department has also opened international classes starting in 2020. Through this international class it is expected to increase the interest of prospective students interested in the maritime field. The Ocean Voice event was attended by lecturers, alumni, students and education staff from the ITK Department. Through this event the ITK Department is expected to be able to establish communication in this digital era with alumni, students, lecturers and the general public. Another routine event to be held by the ITK Department is the ALA-ALA Podcast (Anak Laut Laut Laut) which will present other great guest stars.

[Read full contents: https://republika.co.id/berita/qbmvv0374/dosen-ipb-university-laut-berkelanjutan-masa-depan-kita ]

World Oceans Day : Innovation for a Sustainable Ocean

(June 8, 2020) “As we work to end the pandemic and build back better, we have a once-in-a-generation opportunity – and responsibility – to correct our relationship with the natural world, including the world’s seas and oceans”, Secretary-General António Guterres upheld in his message for the day. We not only rely on the oceans for food, livelihoods, transport and trade but, as the lungs of our planet and its largest carbon sink, they also play a vital role in regulating the global climate. “Today, sea levels are rising due to climate change, threatening lives and livelihoods in low-lying nations and coastal cities and communities around the world”, Mr. Guterres reminded. Moreover, as the oceans are becoming increasingly acidic, marine biodiversity and essential food chains are increasingly being jeopardized. And plastic pollution has become ubiquitous. Against this backdrop, ‘Innovation for a Sustainable Ocean’, has been chosen as this year’s theme.

[Read full contents: https://www.minews.id/asumsi/laut-bukanlah-keranjang-sampah ]

High Tides Have Caused Flooding In Tegal City

(June 4, 2020) Disaster authorities in Indonesia report that 187 homes were damaged after high tides triggered tidal floods in the city of Tegal in Central Java Province. Over 1,300 people from 267 families living in low-lying areas were affected buy the flooding, which began during the afternoon of 03 June. According to a report from the Regional Disaster Management Agency (BPBD) of Tegal City, the worst affected areas are the villages of Muarareja and Tegal Sari. High tides have also caused flooding in Pekalongan City, around 60km east along the coast from Tegal. Antara news agency reported that hundreds of residents were evacuated after flooding struck on 02 June.

[Read full contents: https://regional.kompas.com/read/2020/06/04/11394151/imbas-gelombang-tinggi-air-laut-di-kota-tegal-ribuan-rumah-terendam-banjir ]

Flood hits Life in Cilacap

(May 30, 2020) Flood disaster has hit Cilacap, Central Java on Tuesday May 26, 2020. Flood was not only affected thousands of submerged houses, but also the break of a wave-retaining embankment on Tegal kamulyan Beach in Cilacap, Central Java.

[https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/05/30/rob-dan-gelombang-tinggi-akibatkan-bencana-nelayan-juga-kian-terpuruk/ ]

Area-based conservation: OECMs

(June 3, 2020) Indonesia continues to pursue efforts to conduct watershed management through ‘Other effective area-based conservation measures’ (OECMs) that is a conservation designation for areas that are achieving the effective in-situ conservation of biodiversity outside of protected areas.

[https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/06/03/dengan-metode-oecm-pemerintah-perbanyak-fungsi-konservasi-perairan-laut-indonesia/ ]

Floods Inundate In Indramayu

(June 4, 2020) High waves of sea water flooded residential areas in a number of villages on the coast of Indramayu Regency. Coordinator of the Disaster Preparedness Taruna Field (Tagana) of Indramayu Regency, Waminuddin revealed, floods struck almost evenly along the coast of Indramayu.

[https://ayobandung.com/read/2020/06/04/91439/tak-hanya-cirebon-pesisir-indramayu-juga-dihantam-banjir-rob ]

The Positive Side of Covid-19 for Indonesian Coral Reefs

(June 2, 2020) The COVID-19 pandemic turned out to not only have a profound effect on human life, but also had an impact on the surrounding natural life. Not only the negative impact, the COVID-19 pandemic also had a positive impact. The positive effects of corona outbreaks occur not only on land, but also in the oceans. Pandemic COVID-19 makes the tourism industry, especially marine tourism and diving tourism stalled. The policy of prohibiting foreign tourist visits has caused the tourism sector to go dormant. Including in Indonesia. As an archipelagic country with a wider seascape than its mainland, Indonesia has tremendous marine potential. Both of the fishing industry sector, as well as marine tourism, including underwater tourism.

[Read full contents:https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/06/01/sisi-positif-wabah-corona-bagi-terumbu-karang-indonesia/]

Hawaii Just Got A New 'Largest Volcano On Earth'

(June 2, 2020) Scientists and the public have long thought Mauna Loa, a culturally-significant and active shield volcano on the Big Island of Hawai’i, was the largest volcano in the world. Pūhāhonu (‘turtle rising for breath’ in Hawaiian), a 13-million-year-old volcano in the northwest Hawaiian Ridge, is twice the size of Mauna Loa volcano, which was assumed to be not only the largest Hawaiian volcano but also Earth’s largest known shield volcano, according to new research from the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa. “It has been proposed that hotspots that produce volcano chains like Hawai’i undergo progressive cooling over 1-2 million years and then die,” said lead author Professor Michael Garcia, a researcher in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa.

[Read full contents: https://bekasi.pikiran-rakyat.com/internasional/pr-12393116/peneliti-temukan-gunung-api-terbesar-di-dunia-bersembunyi-di-dasar-laut-samudra-pasifik ]

BMKG Reveals the Cause of High Waves Hit the South Coast of Bali and Lombok

(May 30, 2020) Head of the Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG) Dwikorita Karnawati explained the high waves that hit the southern coast of Bali and Lombok on Thursday, May 28, 2020 that was a phenomenon originated from two different events that sequentially occurred in the same time. The source of strong winds due to Typhoon Amphan in the Northeast Indian Ocean which caused high waves and sea level in Bali and Ampenen which at that time entered the Spring Tide period where large water mounts (Benoa recorded 1.5m, Sheet 1.2m). Dwi explained that strong winds caused the sea level to rise up a tropical cyclone Amphan in the Indian Ocean northwest of Bengkulu, moving from the southern waters of the Indian Kerala peninsula, moving northeast and declining on the mainland of Bangladesh.

[Read full contents: https://www.liputan6.com/news/read/4266647/bmkg-ungkap-penyebab-gelombang-tinggi-hantam-pantai-selatan-bali-dan-lombok ]

The Deep Ocean Is Warming, Research Finds

(May 28, 2020) An international study led by the University of Queensland (UQ) has found that the planet’s deep oceans are warming, albeit at a slower rate than the surface, while examining how ocean life is responding to climate change. Using a metric known as climate velocity, which defines the likely speed and direction a species shifts as the ocean warms, the team calculated the climate velocity throughout the ocean for the past 50 years and then for the rest of this century using data from 11 different climate models. “This allowed us to compare climate velocity in four ocean depth zones – assessing in which zones biodiversity could shift their distribution the most in response to climate change,” said UQ PhD student Isaac Brito-Morales, who led the study. The researchers found climate velocity is currently twice as fast at the surface because of greater surface warming, and as a result deeper-living species are less likely to be at risk from climate change than those at the surface.

[Read full contents: https://www.suara.com/tekno/2020/05/28/121907/permukaan-air-laut-cepat-memanas-dan-berbahaya-pada-spesies-di-laut-dalam ]

The Utilization of Indonesian Marine Products is Not Optimal

(May 18, 2020) Chief of the Nahdlatul Ulama (PBNU) Executive Board for the Economy, Umar Syah Hasan, criticized the use of the marine potential by the Indonesian government. According to Umar, Indonesia's marine products can contribute greatly to state revenue. He considered that until now the utilization of marine products in Indonesia is not up to 30%, even though Indonesia is a maritime country where 70% of its territory is water. "Good minerals, treasure are also there. Then there are various types of fish. But it is not optimal. Until today not yet 30% of marine exploitation. Even though the sea can contribute 45% of GDP, can input into the state budget up to 40%. "But even today 20% haven't," said Umar in a P2NU P2NU online discussion, Monday (5/18/2020). For example, Umar revealed that currently Indonesian fishermen are still struggling to get access to capital for fishing.

[Read full contents: https://finance.detik.com/berita-ekonomi-bisnis/d-5019485/pemanfaatan-hasil-laut-ri-dinilai-belum-optimal ]

Growing Coral and Empowering Communities in Kapoposang

(May 13, 2020) The Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (KKP) carries out labor-intensive and conservation activities, involving fishing communities, on Kapoposang Island, Pangkep Regency, South Sulawesi. It is hoped that this activity can help move the community's economy while improving the coral reef ecosystem in the Kapoposang TWP area. The rehabilitation of coral reefs is carried out using the spider method, which was chosen because it is the easiest for current COVID-19 conditions, because the raw material is faster and the process of coral growth is also faster. Kapoposang Island is one of the rehabilitation targets because from the ecological aspect it is the last bastion of the Spermonde Islands, from the threat of destructive fishing, the use of fishing gear that is not environmentally friendly, tourism and waste disposal.

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/05/13/menumbuhkan-karang-dan-memberdayakan-masyarakat-di-kapoposang/ ]

Collaborating to Save Mangroves in Sulawesi

(May 17, 2020) The condition of mangroves in Indonesia, especially in South Sulawesi, is experiencing tremendous pressure, both from conversion to ponds to development activities in coastal areas. The case that occurred in Lantebung, Makassar, is an important warning of the need for protection of mangroves. Fortunately, the mangrove case that occurred in Lantebung, Bira Village, Tamalanrea District, Makassar, South Sulawesi was immediately handled by the authorities after becoming a public spotlight.

The latest news, there is a statement from the prosecutor's office that will prosecute the case, related to allegations of corruption in the issuance of land ownership certificates, which is the justification of PT. Tompo Dalle in carrying out his activities. Even though the case is already underway and administrative sanctions have been given, Ade sees that their efforts to oversee this case do not end here. A similar threat can occur if there is no attempt to guard and continue campaigning for it.

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/05/17/berkolaborasi-selamatkan-mangrove-di-sulawesi/ ]

KKP Hopes that Pandemic Change Citizens' Behavior about the Dangers of Trash

(May 12, 2020) Director of Coastal and Small Islands Utilization, Director General of Sea Space Management, Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (KKP) Muhammad Yusuf said the Covid-19 pandemic can bring positive things if followed by changes in behavior and policies through regulations and clear sanctions. He conveyed that the work from home movement has brought behavioral changes towards increasing plastic consumption. Therefore, he considered the need for policies for companies to use recycled plastics that are more environmentally friendly so that they can reduce plastic waste. "Plastic waste is a problem and a big threat. Regional surveillance needs to be strengthened so that garbage on land does not leak into the sea," Yusuf said in a press release in Jakarta, Monday (11/5).

[Read full contents: https://republika.co.id/berita/qa763v457/kkp-harap-pandemi-ubah-perilaku-warga-soal-bahaya-sampah ]

Challenge of Coral Reef Conservation during the Pandemic

(May 5, 2020) Efforts to conserve coral reefs faced double challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. Sustainability of observation and the threat of bleaching. On the other hand, maintenance and monitoring must continue so that newly-growing corals can survive. Mongabay Indonesia contacted environmental activists at four coral restoration points on the island of Bali. In the south there is the Nusa Dua Reef Foundation, in the north there is the Karang Lestari Foundation, northeast is the LINI Foundation, and in east Bali there is the Tulamben Dive Guides Organization (OPST). Nyoman Suastika, founder of OPST and local dive guide at the Tulamben dive tourism center, Karangasem regency felt uneasy. Since March, the quarantine period of activity restrictions has begun, he has not been able to dive again to observe and treat the structure of coral transplants at a number of dive sites. Beaches and diving activities are closed. While he had seen bleaching on a number of corals. "There is no diving activity, coral destruction is minimal. But hot weather certainly affects coral, rising water temperatures, and possible bleaching. Unfortunately, diving cannot be checked directly, "he said when contacted on Friday (05/08/2020).

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/05/11/begini-tantangan-konservasi-terumbu-karang-saat-pandemi/ ]

Coronavirus is causing a flurry of plastic waste

(May 5, 2020) The Covid-19 outbreak has increased the need for plastic waste. All of the defining images of the coronavirus pandemic seem to feature one thing: plastic. Surgical masks, gloves, protective equipment, body bags -- the Covid-19 crisis has spurred a rapid expansion in the production of desperately-needed plastic products, with governments racing to boost their stockpiles and regular citizens clamoring for their share of supplies. The implications of those trends could spell years of trouble for our already polluted oceans. "We know that plastic pollution is a global problem -- it existed before the pandemic," Nick Mallos of US-based NGO Ocean Conservancy tells CNN. "(But) we've seen a lot of industry efforts to roll back some of the great progress that's been made. "We need to be quite cautious about where we go, post-pandemic," Mallos adds.

[Read full contents: https://www.suara.com/health/2020/05/05/163000/duh-wabah-covid-19-bikin-masalah-sampah-plastik-makin-mengkhawatirkan ]

Preventing Potential Disasters Amid Climate Change, LIPI Reminds Wise Use of Water

(May 4, 2020) Climate change will affect changes in the water cycle significantly. These conditions will certainly have an impact on human life. LIPI's Limbology Research Center Research Professor Ignasius Dwi Atmana said there will be at least five important impacts that occur due to climate change, namely water pollution, loss of biodiversity, lack of clean water and sanitation, drought and floods to water conflicts. In the midst of climate change, Indonesia is predicted to be affected by rising sea levels. "Rising sea levels can cause some small islands to sink and some cities on the seafront such as Jakarta, Semarang and Surabaya will suffer flooding," said Ignatius.

[Read full contents: https://depok.pikiran-rakyat.com/nasional/pr-09376179/cegah-potensi-bencana-di-tengah-perubahan-iklim-lipi-ingatkan-penggunaan-air-dengan-bijak ]

Poverty is a portrait of coastal communities today

(April 29, 2020) Villages on the North Coast of Java (Pantura), particularly in West Java, are threatened with drowning by abrasion and tidal flooding, as well as massive land use change. Most of the coastal communities and poor fishermen can only surrender to this condition. The loss of natural coastal fortresses such as mangroves worsens people's livelihoods. Mangrove in Pantura recorded 173,000 hectares in the 1800s when Willem Daendels built Pos Anjer-Panaroekan highway. And currently it is drastically reduced by remaining around 45,000 hectares. Now, the north coast of Java faces a heavy burden. The LIPI Oceanographic Research Center even mentioned that Java's Pantura is currently experiencing the worst conditions

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/04/29/pantura-jawa-terancam-karam/ ]

Scientists find highest ever level of microplastics on seafloor

(May 3, 2020) The group of scientists found the largest amount of sea floor microplastic stacks ever recorded. The dirt was found in sedimentary layers pulled from the bottom of Mediterranean waters, near Italy. The study, led by scientists from the University of Manchester, found 1.9 million plastic particles in every square meter. The collection of rubbish they found included clothing fibers and synthetic textile materials, as well as broken pieces of large objects that were crushed from time to time. The findings made the researchers in the study project believe that microplastics, which are smaller than 1 millimeter, are dragged underwater currents to a certain point. "These currents form what we call trash flows, try to imagine dunes," said Ian Kane, leader of a group of scientists from several countries. "The pile can stretch for dozens of kilometers and be as high as hundreds of meters. This is the largest sediment on the face of the earth. The pile is mostly formed from fine mud. So we believe that there is microplastic in it, "Kane told BBC News. Previously there were estimates that around 12 billion tons of plastic waste are discharged into the sea each year, the majority through rivers.


[Read full contents: https://kaltim.idntimes.com/news/kaltim/mhilmansyah/aktivitas-longsor-bawah-laut-teluk-balikpapan-rentan-dihantam-tsunami/full ]

Sea Bamboo Is Still On Sold

(April 30, 2020) Utilization of Sea Bamboo (lisis hippuris spp) to be traded, until now still continues to occur in Indonesia. These activities continue to exist, because there is demand from consumers of these marine life. Although, at this time the status of Bambu Laut has been fully protected by the Government of Indonesia. In other words, the activity of utilizing Sea Bamboo in various ways has now officially become a prohibited or illegal activity. The Indonesian government is working hard to prevent the sale and purchase transaction or shipping of Bamboo Sea from the area of ​​origin to other regions in Indonesia. That is why, the Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (KKP) will take firm action against anyone who tries to use Sea Bamboo to be used as a source of profit. One example of these efforts, had occurred at Pantoloan Port, Palu City, Central Sulawesi on Sunday (4/26/2020) then.

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/04/30/sudah-dilindungi-bambu-laut-masih-saja-diperjualbelikan/ ]

Underwater Landslide Activity, Balikpapan Bay is Vulnerable Hit by Tsunami

(April 27, 2020) Recent research from a combination of British and Indonesian researchers records evidence of the existence of a number of underwater landslides in the Makassar Strait. This underwater landslide can actually trigger a tsunami. "The research team said, if the landslide activity occurs, it will trigger a tsunami in Balikpapan Bay," Balikpapan Geophysical Station Head Mudjianto said on Monday (27/4) when contacted by telephone. This dispels the opinion that the location of Indonesia's new capital in Kutai Kartanegara Regency and North Penajam Paser Regency are safe from disaster. The potential for tsunamis in Balikpapan Bay shows that the area of ​​the national capital which is located close to the bay can be directly affected if a tsunami does occur.

[Read full contents: https://kaltim.idntimes.com/news/kaltim/mhilmansyah/aktivitas-longsor-bawah-laut-teluk-balikpapan-rentan-dihantam-tsunami/full ]

Seaweed Exports to South Korea Keep On Running

(April 27, 2020) Covid-19 outbreaks that weaken industry and trade activities in the world, do not reduce the stretching of micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) and the Indonesian Trade Promotion Center (ITPC) of Busan, South Korea, to work together to pursue export targets. One of the MSMEs in Indonesia, CV Sarana Multi Jaya, has succeeded in exploiting seaweed export opportunities to South Korea. "Although covid-19 has swept the world, including in South Korea and Indonesia, this does not dampen Indonesia's ambitions to increase seaweed commodity exports," Trade Minister Agus Suparmanto said in a statement in Jakarta, quoted from Antara on Monday, April 27, 2020. The export target of cottoni sp seaweed from CV Sarana Multi Jaya continues to be pursued as a follow-up to the signing of contracts with buyers from South Korea at the Indonesian trade mission activities in Busan on November 27, 2019. "This is also in line with the continued high demand for food products amid co-19 conditions," explained the Minister of Trade. The initial transaction of CV Sarana Multi Jaya as an exporter was done by shipping as much as one container of 20 feet of dried seaweed worth USD 17 thousand. Looking ahead, Trade Minister Agus hopes that this transaction is expected to continue.

[Read full contents: https://www.medcom.id/ekonomi/bisnis/yKXAjZ0N-ekspor-rumput-laut-ke-korea-selatan-tetap-berjalan ]

Destruction of Mangroves in Makassar Lantebung, Evidence of Weak Law Enforcement in Coastal Areas

(April 23, 2020) In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Makassar public was shocked by the mangrove logging by PT. Tompo Dalle. Using two units of heavy equipment type excavator and rope sling a subsidiary of PT, knocked down about 200 trees in a location known as mangrove ecotourism on Friday (4/17/2020), Ade Saskia, one of the residents said that he was very surprised by the logging because it was done secretly and without permission from the local government. "We as citizens who have been planting are very shocked and feel cheated. Because the location is a bit far from the settlement so it is not visible, "said Ade. Lantebung mangrove area itself has been the location of mangrove planting from various parties such as the military, banking, provincial government and city government, private sector, students and various mangrove-loving communities. There are tens of thousands of mangroves that have been planted in the last 14 years.

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/04/23/pengrusakan-mangrove-di-lantebung-makassar-bukti-lemahnya-penegakan-hukum-di-wilayah-pesisir/ ]

Ujong Kalak Beach Abrasion Expands, Dozens of Resident's Houses Threatened by Sea Waves

(April 25, 2020) Increasingly abrasion of beach has threatened the residential areas in Ujong Kalak, Gampong Pasir and Suak Indra Puri coastal areas in Johan Pahlawan District, West Aceh Regency. The dykes that have been built before are now beginning to break, and the high waves of sea water have reached some residents' homes in the Ujong Kalak and surrounding areas. Secretary Mukim Ujong Kalak, Johan Pahlawan District, West Aceh Basri Yasin told Serambinews.com on Saturday (4/25/2020) said dam damage in the Ujong Kalak area had occurred in January 2020 due to being hit by a big wave. The condition of abrasion that continues to expand requires immediate treatment because people's homes can later be saved from the threat of abrasion. Because not only housing will erode, but the main road body in the village is also a threat that will be eroded away.

[Read full contents: https://aceh.tribunnews.com/2020/04/25/abrasi-pantai-ujong-kalak-meluas-puluhan-rumah-penduduk-terancam-dihantam-gelombang-laut ]

Megafauna Sharks Threatened By Extinction Threatens Marine Ecosystems

(April 20, 2020) Great whites and whale sharks are among the species at risk of extinction over the next century, a new study has found. In analyzing the marine megafauna and their potential extinctions, researchers found sharks would be hit hardest, with greater losses in terms of "functional richness." "Functional richness is the extent of ecological roles in a community—the many different ways species 'make a living' and in turn affect ecosystems," Catalina Pimiento and John Griffin, from the University of Swansea, U.K., told Newsweek. Pimiento is lead author of a study published in Science Advances that looks at how the extinction of large marine species would impact the ecological roles of ocean ecosystems. In the oceans, the biggest animals are thought to play crucial ecological roles, and are also facing high levels of threat from human activities such as fisheries and climate change.

[Read full contents: https://www.kompas.com/sains/read/2020/04/20/080200523/megafauna-hiu-terancam-punah-ancam-ekosistem-laut-ini-penyebabnya?page=3 ]

LIPI Launches Seagrass Carbon Converter

(April 23, 2020) The Center for Oceanographic Research (P2O) of the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) has launched the Seagrass Carbon Converter (SCC) application. This web-based application for estimating carbon stocks and sequestration in seagrass beds. Through this application carbon stocks and seagrass absorption can be estimated in Indonesian waters. The application can be accessed via the link http://scc.oseanografi.lipi.go.id/. This computer program uses variable density, biomass, and percentage of seagrass coverage. Indonesia has a seagrass area of ​​293 thousand hectares. The total area is the highest in Southeast Asian countries. Information on the extent of seagrass beds can give an indication of the overall condition and potential. If the area decreases, this indicates a pressure or threat to the ecosystem.

[Read full contents: https://darilaut.id/berita/p2o-lipi-luncurkan-aplikasi-seagrass-carbon-converter ]

Rising Carbon Dioxide Levels Will Change Marine Habitats And Fish Communities

(April 15, 2020) Rising carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the consequent changes created through ocean acidification will cause severe ecosystem effects, impacting reef-forming habitats and the associated fish, according to new research. Using submerged natural CO2 seeps off the Japanese Island of Shikine, an international team of marine biologists showed that even slightly higher CO2 concentrations than those existing today may cause profound changes in marine habitats and the fish that rely on them. Writing in Science of The Total Environment, researchers from the Universities of Palermo (Italy), Tsukuba (Japan) and Plymouth (UK) showed that under elevated dissolved CO2 conditions, habitats are dominated by few ephemeral algae. Lead author Dr. Carlo Cattano, from the University of Palermo, said: "Our findings show that the CO2-induced habitat shifts and food web simplification, which we observed along a volcanic gradient in a climatic transition zone, will impact specialist tropical species favouring temperate generalist fish."

[Read full contents: https://nationalgeographic.grid.id/read/132114275/peneliti-ungkap-bagaimana-peningkatan-karbon-pengaruhi-kehidupan-laut ]

Seaweed exports are a sign that the marine sector is moving forward

(April 27, 2020) Director General of Aquaculture of the Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (KKP) Slamet Soebjakto said seaweed export activities signified that the business activities of the marine sector in the country continued to advance amid the COVID-19 pandemic. "I think this seaweed export triggers our optimism that even in the midst of the 19th outbreak of COVID-19 fisheries economic activities are still going on," Slamet Soebjakto. Slamet said this was related to the Minister of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries Edhy Prabowo who released the export of spinosum seaweed in Serang, Banten, April 25, 2020. He expressed his hope that seaweed export activities will contribute to foreign exchange amid economic impacts due to COVID-19 which affect national economic performance. Not only seaweed, he said, other commodities such as grouper and shrimp also provide certainty that exports of fishery products continue to run and prospectively in the midst of a pandemic.

[Read full contents: https://www.antaranews.com/berita/1446020/kkp-ekspor-rumput-laut-pertanda-sektor-kelautan-terus-melaju ]

FAO: Indonesia Has Potential To Be a Global Food Supplier, Especially Seafood Products

(April 15, 2020) The World Food and Agriculture Agency (FAO) said that Indonesia has the opportunity as a global food supplier, especially for seafood. This is in line with the stable production level in the midst of a Covid-19. "With a stable level of marine production, Indonesia can become the world's food supply, especially fish," said National Project Officer, Indonesian Seas Large Marine Ecosystem (ISLME) -FAO, Muh Lukman quoted Antara, Wednesday (15/4). However, Indonesia must first provide confidence that the products produced are not contaminated by Covid-19. Therefore, the government must be able to guarantee that Indonesian fishermen are not exposed to Covid-19. "To convince that we need an institution that can convince, this is to enter the international market. We must guarantee clean and healthy products," he said.

[Read full contents: https://www.merdeka.com/uang/fao-indonesia-berpotensi-jadi-pemasok-pangan-dunia-terutama-hasil-laut.html ]

Marine Ecosystem Threatened by Water Pollution

(April 15, 2020) Pollution in sea waters has always been a complicated problem and is not easily solved by the Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries. So far, cases of pollution that occur in the territorial waters of Indonesia, almost always handled by experts who are owned by the Ministry of Environment and Forestry (KLHK). Dependence on other ministries is a serious problem because it makes KKP unable to move on its own to solve any problems caused by pollution cases. As stated by the KKP Marine Resources Supervision and Management Director Matheus Eko Rudianto, his party relies on the apparatus of the Directorate General of Maritime and Fisheries Resources Supervision (PSDKP) KKP, especially the Special Police for Coastal and Small Islands Management (Polsus PW3K).

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/04/15/ekosistem-laut-terancam-pencemaran-perairan/ ]

Lobster Digestion of Microplastics Could Further Foul The Food Chain

(April 14, 2020) New research has found a species of lobster that grinds plastic waste into smaller microplastic particles. The new study carried out by scientists at Italy’s Universitá Politecnica delle Marche and Universitá degli Studi di Cagliari sought to establish what happens when these types of low-lying species ingest plastic waste.In lobsters collected near Sardinia in the Mediterranean Sea, the researchers found that larger plastic particles became trapped in the crustaceans' stomachs. The research was published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

[Read full contents: https://life.trubus.id/baca/36284/lobster-mampu-memecah-mikroplastik-dan-melepaskannya-kembali-ke-laut ]

Coral Transplantation In Coral Garden, The Nusa Dua

(April 11, 2020) Coral Park in the waters of Nusa Dua, Bali, began to show its beauty. This transplanted garden is named Nusa Dua Coral Garden (NDCG). In mid-2016, The Nusa Dua Reef Foundation (NDRF) began its pilot project ofconducting a coral transplantation as an effort to support the conservation of coastal and marine ecosystems in Bali. Coral transplantation was carried out at The Nusa Dua beach. The goal of coral transplantation are to transplant corals in the shallow waters of The Nusa Dua, restore damaged reef ecosystems, raise awareness among people about the importance of coral reefs. Until early 2020, NDCG has installed 271 reef stars structures by transplanting about 4000 coral fragments from 6 hard coral genera, namely Acropora, Montipora, Pocillopora, Galaxea, Stylophora and Geniopora.

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/04/11/indahnya-transplantasi-karang-di-nusa-dua-coral-garden/ ]

Sea Issues in Indonesia's Climate Change And Readiness Convention

(April 10, 2020) Recently, Indonesia finalized submission materials to be submitted to the UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change) related to the issue of the sea that began rolling since the implementation of COP 25 (Blue COP) in Madrid, Spain in 2018. In its decision, the Indonesian side asked the the head of the SBSTA (the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice) to hold a dialogue on the sea and climate change at the 52nd meeting which was due to take place in June 2020.

To facilitate this dialogue, the UNFCCC asked stakeholders (countries, organizations, forums and so on) to submit submissions related to the issues to be discussed in the dialogue to be held during the SBSTA session. In its submission, Indonesia emphasizes the importance of exchanging information, experience and practices that can be implemented properly for the benefit of resilience in coastal communities as the groups most affected by climate change.

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/04/13/isu-laut-dalam-konvensi-perubahan-iklim-dan-kesiapan-indonesia/ ]

Sea Animals Teach Us About Viruses

(April 10, 2020) A variety of sea animals can take up virus particles while filtering seawater for oxygen and food. Sponges are particularly efficient, wrote marine ecologist Jennifer Welsh from the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ) this week in a publication in Scientific Reports. “When a virus infects a cell”, says Jennifer Welsh, “it uses its host to make new viruses. When these are released, they can, in turn, infect many more new cells.” However, Welsh discovered that the many virus particles in the sea – over 150 million in a glass of seawater – can also end up for a large part as the lunch of a diverse group of sea animals. The most efficient virus-killers turned out to be sponges. Breadcrumb sponges (Halichondria panicea), which abound in the North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea, showed that they could remove 98% of viruses in the course of a day – with 94% eradicated within only three hours.

[Read full contents: https://nationalgeographic.grid.id/read/132086093/studi-hewan-laut-diketahui-efektif-mengurangi-kehadiran-virus ]

Fishing Sector Optimism Past COVID-19

(April 2, 2020) The Indonesian government wants to ensure the logistics supply for fishery food can continue to run well for all communities in 34 provinces. To ensure that, hard work is needed so that production can continue, even though the COVID 19 pandemic is ongoing now. By continuing to run production for capture fisheries and aquaculture, it can also ensure that fishery food supply can continue to run, both during an outbreak like now, or after an outbreak is declared over later. In order for production to work, access to and between regions must also remain open despite the status of quarantine. Thus, the delivery of production inputs such as fish, brood stock, seeds, seaweed, other production facilities, the results of aquaculture production and capture fisheries can run smoothly.

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/04/02/optimisme-sektor-perikanan-lewati-pandemi-covid-19/ ]

Ocky Karna Radjasa: Sustainable Management with Drugs from Marine Genetics

(April 2, 2020) "Jalesveva Jayamahe." This appeal has existed since the Majapahit era, with the meaning "In the sea we are victorious." This meaning is deep enough if you see Indonesia has the potential of large marine wealth that must be wisely utilized in order to remain sustainable.

Ocky Karna Radjasa(the second person from the left of the picture), never thought of becoming an expert in marine microbiology. "So, I am also trapped between love," said the man who won the 2006 Kehati Award in the Cipta Lestari Kehati category. At that time, Ocky offered a new method of utilizing tropical coral reefs for antibiotic and anticancer drugs.

This man who was born in Purwokerto began to pursue this field when he was a bachelor student in the Faculty of Biology at Soedirman University, Purwokerto. At that time, when taking microbiology courses in general, Ocky was asked to be a practicum assistant.

After graduating, he had the opportunity to serve in the Diponegoro University's Ocean Study Program, Semarang and get a Decree (SK) in Marine Microbiology. That's a new field for Ocky.

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/04/02/ocky-karna-radjasa-kelola-berkelanjutan-dengan-obat-obatan-dari-genetik-laut/ ]

Illegal Fishing Still Rampan In NTT (East Nusa Tenggara )

(April 5, 2020) ​Destructive fishing activities such as fish bombing are still rife in the waters of the island of Flores, East Nusa Tenggara (NTT), both on the north coast of Flores Island and in the Savu sea in the south of the island of Flores. In 2019, a total of 952 fishing vessels were inspected and 33 destructive fishing perpetrators were captured from South Sulawesi, Southeast Sulawesi, West Nusa Tenggara, East Nusa Tenggara and South Kalimantan. While in 2020, there were 24 perpetrators successfully secured. Even though the Government of East Flores Regency (Flotim) is aggressively holding operations to arrest perpetrators of destructive fishing. Lecturer at the Faculty of Marine and Fisheries of the University of Nusa Nipa (Unipa) Maumere, Yohanes Don Bosco R. Minggo, pointed out the current law system is too weak and advise that to solve this problem, an alternative livelihood is needed in the hope that it can provide added value. That way, coastal communities or fishermen who do destructive fishing will decrease.

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/04/05/destructive-fishing-masih-marak-terjadi-di-ntt-kenapa/ ]

Marine Life Can Be Rebuilt By 2050

(April 3, 2020) ​An international study recently published in the journal Nature that was led by KAUST Professors of Marine Science Carlos Duarte and Susana Agustí lays out the roadmap of actions required for the planet’s marine life to recover to full abundance by 2050. The project brings together the world’s marine scientists working across four continents, in 10 countries and from 16 universities. “We are at a point where we can choose between a legacy of a resilient and vibrant ocean or an irreversibly disrupted ocean,” said Duarte, who is also the Tarek Ahmed Juffali research chair in Red Sea ecology. If all recovery wedges are activated at scale, recovery timescales of previously damaged marine life show that the abundance of marine life can be recovered within one human generation, or two to three decades, by 2050. A key element identified for success is the mitigation of climate change by reducing global greenhouse gas emissions.

[Read full contents: https://nationalgeographic.grid.id/read/132087500/peneliti-prediksi-kehidupan-laut-bisa-kembali-pulih-pada-2050 ]

Explanation of LIPI and PVMBG about Bubbles in the Sea Near Anak Krakatau

(April 4, 2020) Head of the Indonesian Ocean Research Center (LIPI), Nugroho Dwi Hananto, said that large air bubbles burst into the water level in the Sunda Strait not far from the east side on the shores of Gunung Anak Krakatau Beach, Province Lampung, it's been a long time. He said the air bubbles were the result of underwater hydrothermal activity at the location. Hydrothermal process in the sea itself is the interaction between sea water and magma under the sea floor. "The magma is indeed under Mount Anak Krakatau. The kitchen of this magma is causing the volcanic activity of the Krakatau cub. Well, this hydrothermal activity may occur due to the interaction of sea water with magma kitchens around the main source. So the activity of this magma has been there hasn't always meant it happened yesterday, " said Nugroho.

[Read full contents: https://regional.kompas.com/read/2020/04/04/12163971/penjelasan-lipi-dan-pvmbg-soal-gelembung-di-laut-dekat-anak-krakatau ]

Mangrove Conservation Bring Rp. 650 Million A Year

(March 27, 2020) Thomas Heri Wahyono, a resident of Lempong Pucung Hamlet, Ujung Alang Village, Kampung Laut, Cilacap, Central Java, proves that by carrying out a conservation movement, it brings good fortune. Since 2001, Wahyono and dozens of residents have been planting mangroves, and their production can even reach 500 thousand to 600 thousand sticks annually with a turnover of Rp. 650 million / year. He also continued to plant mangrove areas in Kampung Laut, he even taught himself to study mangroves, so that they can identify and have now been recorded with the Department of Anthropology, Social Sciences, University of Indonesia. Not only the fathers, the mothers in the local hamlet also utilize parts of the mangrove plant to be processed into snacks and drinks.

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/03/27/konservasi-mangrove-ternyata-mampu-datangkan-rp650-juta-per-tahun/ ]

Bathysphere, Advanced Seabed Explorer Tool

(March 30, 2020) On May 27, 1930, Barton and Beebe made their first dives in the Bermuda sea. At that time, Bathysphere was linked to ships belonging to the British navy using a long metal cable. Bathysphere with Beebe in it then put into the sea. Over the years, a number of dives continue to be carried out with increasing depth. How the Bathysphere can be such a reliable tool for wading the deep sea. The key is in the various advanced technologies it has. In the Bathysphere there are various equipment such as telephones, electric lights, oxygen, and calcium chloride to absorb carbon dioxide produced by humans who ride it.

[Read full contents: https://kumparan.com/absal-bachtiar/bathysphere-alat-canggih-penjelajah-dasar-laut-1t7sgFQqm22 ]

Strategy To Protect Fishers And Fish Cultivators From The Impact Of The COVID-19

(March 30, 2020) The 19th global pandemic of COVID triggered various negative impacts on the marine and fisheries sector. In Indonesia, the negative impacts began to be felt by fishermen and fish farmers in all coastal areas. Specifically in the aquaculture sub-sector, the negative impact is feared to reduce the production of various commodities which have been the backbone for the State. Especially, shrimp commodities that have entered the production target with an increase of up to 250% in 2024. Various strategies have been prepared by the Government of Indonesia to anticipate the negative impact of COVID 19 on aquaculture.The Government prepared a scenario to save the aquaculture industry, one of which was by buying aquaculture production. The strategy is prepared, so that production can continue to run normally and can simultaneously pursue the target in 2024.

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/03/30/ini-strategi-lindungi-nelayan-dan-pembudi-daya-ikan-dari-dampak-wabah-covid-19/ ]

The Return Of The Karangsong Mangrove In The Midst Of The Threat Of The North Java Crisis

(March 28, 2020) The Karangsong mangrove forest area, Indramayu Regency, has again become a 'magnificent house' for shorebirds on the north coast of West Java. The condition of the Karangsong mangrove forest has improved after the people have been keen to reforest. Plus the Ministry of Forestry and Environment (KLHK) made Karangsong the center of mangrove research in western Indonesia in 2015. Data from the Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (KKP) shows damage to coastal areas on the north coast of Java, the worst in Indonesia. The damage to the coastal area is due to land use change that degrades coastal ecosystems, especially mangrove forests.

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/03/28/kembali-lebatnya-mangrove-karangsong-ditengah-ancaman-krisis-pesisir-utara-jawa/ ]

New Kind Of Plastic Is Made To Degrade In Seawater

(March 27, 2020) Japanese researchers have developed a new kind of biodegradable plastic that could help. The material, reported in the journal Carbohydrate Polymers, is made from starch and cellulose, and could be a step towards a low-cost biodegradable plastic that can be mass-produced. Researchers at Osaka University made the new transparent plastic from cellulose and starch. Both are common, cheap natural biological polymers. Starch is found in corn and potatoes, while cellulose is the main component of plant walls. “Because these materials are cheap and the manufacturing process is simple, we can expect that the developed material will be put to practical use soon,” said applied chemistry professor Taka-Aki Asoh. The plastic is a membrane made of starch that is reinforced with tiny, microscopic cellulose fibers. It is strong and does not swell in water. But it breaks down in seawater over time. “We have great expectations that our material will help solve the growing global problem of marine debris accumulation and have a major societal impact,” said Asoh.

[Read full contents: https://www.ayobandung.com/read/2020/03/27/84040/plastik-yang-bisa-terurai-saat-kena-air-laut-tengah-dikembangkan ]

2-Hour of Clean Beach, 1 Ton of Trash Collected

(March 15, 2020) Beach and Sea Clean is a form of activity carried out by many parties, to make the community aware of the importance of maintaining cleanliness of the sea. Pandu Laut Nusantara, Eco Nusa Foundation, and the Indonesian Marine Conservation Foundation (YKL) conducted a joint movement to clean the beach and the sea at Tanjung Bayang Beach, Makassar on Sunday (03/15/2020). This joint movement, which was followed by 57 organizations and communities as well as the general public with around 1,300 participants, is expected to invite the public, especially the people of Makassar, to not throw garbage into the sea and also reduce the use of disposable plastic so as not to have an impact on the damage to the marine ecosystem.

[Read full contents: https://fajar.co.id/2020/03/15/2-jam-bersih-pantai-dan-laut-1-ton-sampah-dikumpulkan/# ]

Residents of Sukajahi-Indramayu Village Communicate Sea Water and Flood Abrasion

(March 5, 2020) The arrival of M.Sidkon DJ as a member of Commission I of West Java DPRD to carry out recess activities, has been waiting for about 100 more people from the village of Sukahaji-Patrol Subdistrict Indramayu Jabar Regency. On the occasion, representatives of Sukahaji residents expressed their aspirations about the flood problem. Residents also conveyed the aspirations of abrasion problems that often occur in areas around Patrol sub-district.

[Read full contents: https://bandungberita.com/warga-desa-sukajahi-indramayu-sampaikan-abrasi-air-laut-dan-banjir-kepada-dewan-jabar/#.XnwT0OozbIW ]

Pristine Underwater Forest Hasn't Changed in Decades

(March 16, 2020) Scientists have returned to a group of underwater kelp forests off the tip of South America for the first time since 1973 – and they've found the ecosystem virtually unchanged despite the passage of nearly half a century. These seaweed forests, close to Tierra del Fuego, are something of a marine marvel. Kelp forests like these are under threat from climate change and human activity, but divers found that this particular stretch had the same numbers of kelp, sea urchins and sea stars as it did in the early 1970s. The researchers didn't spot any signs of urchin barrens – this is a harmful type of unchecked sea urchin grazing that's been spotted in other kelp forests, and which can quickly reduce kelp levels. "Re-examination of this remote region is valuable in this age of climate change, and gives us a better understanding of how these ecosystems function in the absence of direct human impacts," says oceanographer Alan Friedlander, from the National Geographic Society.

[Read full contents: https://www.kompas.com/sains/read/2020/03/16/193200323/hampir-setengah-abad-ekosistem-hutan-bawah-laut-ini-tidak-berubah ]

LIPI: Rising Seawater Rises Fast, Jakarta Threatened

(March 6, 2020) The Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) states Jakarta has the potential to sink in the coming years. LIPI Oceanography Research Center Researcher, Intan Suci Nurhati, said Jakarta could sink because of land subsidence and sea-level rise. "If you look at the rate of land subsidence by the use of groundwater (subsidence) and sea-level rise, (Jakarta) it is very possible (sinking)," Intan told CNNIndonesia.com. Intan said the document Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said the average global sea level (GMSL) must be increasing and accelerating. He said the GSML would rise between 0.43 m (0.29-0.59 m, probable range) and 0.84 m (0.61-1.10 m, probable range) by 2100. Furthermore, the document said that global sea-level rise was not uniform and regionally varied. However, he said the extreme situation would make small towns in the lowlands and small islands projected to sink faster by 2050.

[Read full contents: https://www.cnnindonesia.com/teknologi/20200306081714-199-480998/lipi-kenaikan-air-laut-global-naik-cepat-jakarta-terancam

Ocean Plastic May Smell Like Food To Hungry Turtles

(March 10, 2020) Scientists have new evidence to explain why plastic is dangerous to sea turtles: the animals mistake the scent of plastic for food. Thus, a plastic bag floating in the sea not only looks like a jellyfish snack, but it gives off a similar odour. This "olfactory trap" might help explain why sea turtles are prone to eating and getting entangled in plastic, say US researchers. Plastic debris is rapidly accumulating in the oceans. The likes of plastics bags, netting and bottles pose a threat to hundreds of marine species, including endangered turtles, birds and whales. Odours given off by floating or submerged plastics were an "olfactory trap" for sea turtles, said Dr Joseph Pfaller of the University of Florida, Gainesville. "Plastics that have spent time in the ocean develop smells that turtles are attracted to and this is an evolutionary adaptation for finding food, but it has now become a problem for turtles because they're attracted to the smells from the plastics," he said.

[Read full contents: https://www.tempo.co/bbc/5751/ilmuwan-ungkap-mengapa-penyu-menyantap-sampah-plastik-di-laut ]

Sumba, Prioritized To A Hydro-oceanographic Survey

(March 10, 2020) Sumba Island, East Nusa Tenggara (NTT), is classified as a disaster-prone province. The island, which borders Australia directly to the south, is indeed prone to earthquakes with various types, ranging from small to large magnitude, to potentially tsunami. The island of Sumba is always rocked by earthquakes because it is at the confluence of two tectonic plates, the Indoaustralia plate and the Eurasian plate. Sumba has been rocked by earthquake several times. In 1977 a magnitude 7.0 earthquake (SR) occurred which caused a tsunami wave as high as 10 meters, then in April 2019, and the last event was on January 22, 2020 with a magnitude of 6.4 on the Richter scale. Based on these events, Sumba Island was prioritized nationally by Pushidrosal(the Navy Hydrographic and Oceanographic Center) to conduct a hydro-oceanographic survey and mapping. Pushidrosal places the waters of Waikelo, Southwest Sumba is setting as a priority for a hydro-oceanographic survey in 2020.

[Read full contents: https://makassar.terkini.id/pushidrosal-tni-survei-hidro-oseanografi-di-waikelo-sumba-barat-daya/ ]

Abrasion Threatens to Wipe Out 400 Residents In Tegal

(March 6, 2020) Abrasion is increasingly eroding the coast of the North Coast (Pantura) of Central Java, precisely at Muarareja Beach, West Tegal District, Tegal City. As many as 400 family heads were affected and seven of them almost lost their homes. Based on data collected, abrasion occurred in three Pillars (RT) namely RT 2, 3 and 4 in RW 03, Kelurahan Muarareja. Sea water has increasingly eroded the shoreline since 2005 until 2019, or about 14 years. According to Chairman of RW 03, Nurochim, abrasion usually occurs in the months of May to July. "From the beginning it was only just reviewed, but there was no action. In fact, two days ago some people came here. I don't know which agency or ministry," he complained. Residents' concerns are growing that there was no concrete action from the government.

[Read full contents: https://jateng.idntimes.com/news/indonesia/muchammad-haikal-adithya/abrasi-ancam-lenyapkan-400-rumah-warga-dan-20-hektare-tambak-di-tegal/full ]

Scientists Call For Action To Save Red Sea's Coral Reefs

(March 8, 2020) An international group of researchers has called on UNESCO to declare the Red Sea’s 4000km of coral reef as a Marine World Heritage Site and recommends additional measures critical for the reef’s survival. Led by Karine Kleinhaus, MD, of the Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS), the team have found that the coral reef ecosystem in the Red Sea’s Gulf of Aqaba is highly resilient to rising sea temperatures. Corals in the Gulf of Aqaba, at the northernmost portion of the Red Sea, withstand water temperature irregularities that cause severe bleaching or mortality in most hard corals elsewhere. This uniquely resilient reef employs biological mechanisms which are likely to be important for coral survival as the planet's oceans warm. But while the Gulf of Aqaba could potentially be one of the planet's largest marine refuges from climate change, its reef will only survive and flourish if serious regional environmental challenges are addressed.

[Read full contents: https://life.trubus.id/baca/35704/ilmuwan-serukan-unesco-untuk-memulai-penyelamatan-terumbu-karang-laut-merah ]

Indonesian Navy Forces Find Unmanned undersea cables

(March 5, 2020) The Indonesian Navy's Hydrographic and Oceanographic Center (Pushidrosal) found unmanned undersea cable that was laid in the waters of the Gelasa Strait, Belitung Island. The submarine cable was discovered by the Pushidrosal Survey Team when conducting a survey and mapping operation in the Gelasa Strait Waters to support the Komodo 2020 Multilateral Naval Exercise on Belitung Island. The cable was found when the team conducted the screening to obtain a seafloor topographic picture using the Multibeam Echosounder Reson Teledyn T50-P with WADGPS POS M / W positioning and as a vertical control, the depth of the yield was corrected to the Lowest Low Water Spring (LLWS). The results of the data analysis with Multibeam Echosounder, verified the existence of submarine cables listed on the Indonesia Sea Map number 64 in the June 2019 edition and registered at Pushidrosal.

[Read full contents: https://www.galamedianews.com/nasional/249742/pushidrosal-tni-al-temukan-kabel-bawah-laut-tak-bertuan-di-selat-gelasa.html ]

Indonesian Marine Bacteria into Natural Anti-Biotics

(March 2, 2020) Researchers at Ma Chung Research Center for Photosynthetic Pigments (MRCPP), Ma Chung University, prove the extraordinary biological wealth that exists in Indonesia. One proof of that wealth is marine bacteria. The MRCPP researchers at Ma Chung University were able to develop and study bacteria from Indonesian marine waters, becoming natural antibiotic ingredients, as a substitute for antibiotics made from chemicals. Recent study found the marine bacteria Pseudoalteromonas rubra which produces anti-microbial pigments and Indonesia's waters are very rich in pigmented bacteria which are very beneficial for human life.

[Read full contents: https://jatim.sindonews.com/read/25153/1/ma-chung-kembangkan-bakteri-laut-indonesia-jadi-anti-biorik-alami-1583139806 ]

Mass Fish Deaths Off North Maluku Sea Spark Concern

(February 28, 2020) Residents in Halmahera and Ternate, North Maluku, were shocked by the abundance of marine ecology from fish to dead octopus, and the reddish-brown seawater condition that occurred earlier this week. BKIPM(Balai Karantina Ikan Pengendalian Mutu dan Keamanan Hasil Perikanan; Fish Quarantine Control and Quality Control Center for Fisheries) is identifying plankton/algae related to the condition of seawater that turns brown to find out whether or not algae blooming is suspected to cause fish death.Meanwhile, Researchers in the Field of Oceanographic Resources and Coastal Vulnerability Research (LRSDKP) - Research and Human Resources Agency for Marine and Fisheries (BRSDM), said that information related to the mass death of fish on Ternate's Falajawa Beach requires in-depth research. "Some news sources say that there is potential for algae blooms and temperature increases, but there are no measurement results, so all the info is still in the form of conjecture."

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/02/28/ini-hasil-penelitian-bkipm-ternate-soal-fenomena-kematian-ikan-masal-di-maluku-utara/ ]

S. Korea To Launch Air Pollution Monitoring Satellite

(February 19, 2020) The world's first geostationary environment-monitoring satellite, built by South Korea, has been successfully launched, the country's state-run aerospace research institute The Ariane-5 rocket carrying the 3.4-ton Chollian-2B, tasked with monitoring the movement of fine dust and other air pollutants, as well as tides, in the East Asian region is on course to reach its fixed orbit 36,000 kilometers above the Earth's equator after lifting off from French Guiana at 07:18 p.m. (local time), according to the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI).

[Read full contents: https://en.yna.co.kr/view/AEN20200218007551320 ]

Global Warming Is Speeding Up Ocean Currents

(February 26, 2020) Ocean currents are moving faster today than they did two decades ago. New research, published on Feb. 6 in the journal Science Advances, finds that this acceleration is occurring around the globe, with the most noticeable effects in the tropical latitudes. The enhanced speed isn’t just at the ocean’s surface, but is occurring as deep as 6,560 feet (2,000 meters). “The magnitude and extent of the acceleration in ocean currents we detected throughout the global ocean and to 2000-meter (6,560 foot) depth was quite surprising," study co-author Janet Sprintall, an oceanographer at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego.

[Read full contents: https://nationalgeographic.grid.id/read/132033995/studi-kecepatan-arus-laut-makin-tinggi-akibat-perubahan-iklim ]

Exploring The Ocean For Promising Medicine Development

(February 24, 2020) Head of the National Research and Innovation Agency (BRIN) in Minister of Research and Technology, Bambang PS Brodjonegoro said Indonesia needs to be more exploration in developing medicinal raw materials from biodiversity especially those in the sea, which are still not yet utilized optimally. For the development of drugs and medical devices, he said, the strengthening of the triple helix must be carried out, namely between researchers or academics, the government and the industrial world. Researchers will examine based on market needs, not only because of the pleasure in the field that is controlled so that the results of research, technology and innovation products can convey benefits.

[Read full contents: https://www.antaranews.com/berita/1321490/menteri-perlu-lebih-eksploratif-kembangkan-bahan-baku-obat-dari-laut ]

KKP - APEC Holds Enhancement Training HR Capacity For Fighting Against Ocean Plastics

(February 18, 2020) The Government of Indonesia through the Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (KKP) in collaboration with the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) held a capacity building training program related to handling marine waste entitled "Global Marine Debris Monitoring and Modeling: Support Protection of the Marine Environment" at the Discovery Kartika Plaza Hotel Kuta, Bali in February 20, 2020. This capacity building program is an initiation of the CTF proposed at the APEC meeting in Chile, in 2019. Through this program it is expected to build global capacity to predict the movement of waste at sea, strengthen institutional cooperation in the marine sector by providing web-based information to monitor garbage in the sea as well as a manifestation of Indonesia's concern for the marine environment by providing information and methodologies regarding monitoring and modeling to APEC and ASEAN economies in particular.

[Read full contents: https://news.kkp.go.id/index.php/perangi-sampah-di-laut-kkp-apec-gelar-pelatihan-peningkatan-kapasitas-sdm/ ]

Heatwave Cooks Mussels In Their Shells Roasted To Death

(February 19, 2020) A heat wave that sizzled much of California appears to have taken a devastating toll on a sea creature that is foundational to the marine ecosystem. Jackie Sones, research coordinator for Bodega Marine Reserve north of San Francisco, said she saw hundreds or even thousands of dead mussels along the rugged Northern California coast after unusually hot temperatures cooked them to death.

[Read full contents: https://nationalgeographic.grid.id/read/132031152/akibat-kenaikan-suhu-laut-ratusan-ribu-kerang-mati-terpanggang?page=all ]

Middle School Students Created Oil Spill Filter In The Sea

(February 20, 2020) Semarang PAPB IT Middle School team won the bronze category at the Asia Innovation Science and Entrepreneur Fair (AISEF) 2020. The event, which was participated by 165 teams from six countries, was held at the BG Junction Mall in Surabaya. on that occasion, a team consisting of five IT PAPB Semarang junior high school students were competing in a tool called the water robot C-017, an oil spill filter device at sea.

[Read full contents: https://www.suaramerdeka.com/news/baca/218166/smp-it-papb-ciptakan-alat-penyaring-tumpahan-minyak-di-laut ]

APP Develops Plastic-less Coating Technology

(February 10, 2020) In the Climate Corner discussion forum, Asia Pulp and Paper (APP) Sinar Mas said its research team has succeeded in developing a plastic-less coating technology that ensures its new packaging can be decomposed by almost 100% without special treatment The Climate Corner is a multi-stakeholder forum for sharing knowledge and experiences on best practices in climate change adaptation and mitigation.

[Read full contents: https://riaupos.co/223273-berita-app-sinar-mas-kembangkan-teknologi-lapisan-tanpa-plastik.html ]

New Solar-powered Desalination With 385% Efficiency

(February 11, 2020) A completely passive solar-powered desalination system developed by researchers at MIT and in China could provide more than 1.5 gallons of fresh drinking water per hour for every square meter of solar collecting area. Such systems could potentially serve off-grid arid coastal areas to provide an efficient, low-cost water source. The key to the system’s efficiency lies in the way it uses each of the multiple stages to desalinate the water. At each stage, heat released by the previous stage is harnessed instead of wasted. In this way, the team’s demonstration device can achieve an overall efficiency of 385 percent in converting the energy of sunlight into the energy of water evaporation.

[Read full contents: https://www.liputan6.com/tekno/read/4175099/peneliti-temukan-metode-desalinasi-air-laut-sederhana-bertenaga-surya ]

BAKAMLA Will Be Sole Law Enforcement At Sea

(February 20, 2020) The Marine Security Agency (Kepala Badan Keamanan Laut; BAKAMLA) is targeting completion of the draft of the Omnibus Law on maritime by this year. In reference to Omnibus Law on maritime will place BAKAMLA as the full authority of law enforcement in the Indonesian seas in accordance with President Joko Widodo's instructions. There are around 17 laws that regulate maritime matters as of now. According to Aan Kurnia, Head of BAKAMLA, these 17 laws could be simplified into just one or two regulations. He claimed Jokowi had agreed that BAKAMLA becomes the only law enforcement agency at sea.

[Read full contents: https://www.cnnindonesia.com/nasional/20200220001327-20-476295/omnibus-law-kelautan-bakamla-penegak-hukum-tunggal-di-laut]

APEC Highlights The Importance Of Biodiversity

(February 11, 2020) APEC(Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation) is now accepting nominations for the 2020 APEC Science Prize for Innovation, Research and Education, or ASPIRE, which spotlights cross-border innovations led by scientists in the region. APEC 2020 host economy Malaysia has declared this year’s theme as ‘Biodiversity for a Prosperous Economy’. The 2020 ASPIRE Prize will be awarded to scientific research focused on biodiversity and how it contributes to local livelihoods, traditional and modern medicines, and economic development.

[Read full contents: https://ekonomi.bisnis.com/read/20200211/12/1199766/apec-dorong-perkembangan-riset-keanekaragaman-hayati]

Bali Fights For Its Beautiful Beaches Against Plastic Trash

(February 2, 2020) Popular tourist destination Kuta beach in Bali, Indonesia, is regularly covered in waste, most of it plastic that washes ashore during the rainy season. "Bali has banned the use of single-use plastic items in a bid to cut down on ocean pollution," said Putu Astawa, Head of the Bali Provincial Tourism Office. Many issues being discussed are environmental impact has brought a renewed interest in exploring solutions and opportunities to many of the problems associated with Bali's tourism industry.

[Read full contents: https://travel.detik.com/travel-news/d-4882434/soal-sampah-plastik-di-kuta-bali-ini-kata-kadispar ]

Dungeness Crab Shells Dissolved By Acidified Ocean

(January 28, 2020) As the Pacific Ocean becomes more acidic, Dungeness crabs that live in coastal areas are seeing their shells eaten away. Lower pH levels in the ocean waters are causing parts of Dungeness crab shells to dissolve, which damages their sensory organs, according to a study published this month in the journal Science of the Total Environment and funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The study authors looked at ocean acidification levels from 2016. Issues with Dungeness crabs can be significant beyond your seafood dinner. Dungeness crabs are vital to the West Coast fishing industry — netting around $200 million annually. They are also important to tribal and recreational crabbers.

[Read full contents: https://life.trubus.id/baca/34959/peningkatan-kadar-asam-air-laut-merusak-cangkang-kepiting-organ-paling-keras-mahluk-di-lautan ]

Indonesia Launches First Locally Assembled Submarine In Cooperation with Korea

(January 21, 2020) Indonesian shipbuilder PT PAL has launched the country's third Nagapasa (Type 209/1400)-class diesel-electric submarine (SSK). The vessel, which will be in service as KRI Alugoro (405) once commissioned, was launched on 11 April at PT PAL's Semarang Dock in Surabaya Indonesia. While third-in-class overall, Alugoro is the first-ever submarine to be assembled in Indonesia. Its assembly was done in collaboration with engineers from South Korean shipbuilder Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering (DSME) as part of a technology transfer programme. "Indonesia is the only country in the Southeast Asian region that is able to develop and build submarine technology," explained PT PAL on its official website on January 21, 2020.

[Read full contents: https://www.cnbcindonesia.com/news/20200121123926-4-131530/ri-sukses-bikin-kapal-selam-satu-satunya-di-asean ]

Indonesia Aims To Tackle Plastic Waste

(January 11, 2020) The Government of Indonesia has formulated a National Action Plan related to the management and reduction of waste at sea. The reduction of plastic waste by 70 percent is targeted to be carried out in 2025. The Ministry of Environment and Forestry sets out the following five marine waste management strategies: 1. National movement to increase stakeholder awareness. 2. Management of origin of the waste. 3. Waste management on the coast and sea. 4. Strengthening the regulation and supervision 5. Research and development.

[Read full contents: https://www.suara.com/yoursay/2020/01/11/141518/hadapi-persoalan-sampah-plastik-di-laut-begini-strategi-pemerintah]

Jokowi: Indonesia Has Sovereign Rights In Natuna Sea

(January 08, 2020) Indonesian President Joko Widodo vowed on Wednesday, January 8, 2020 to enforce his country’s sovereignty over waters off the Natuna Islands as he visited the region amid diplomatic tensions with China over maritime rights. Jokowi has insisted that Indonesia has sovereign rights over natural resources in its exclusive economic zone (EEZ) in the North Natuna Sea while allowing foreign vessels to pass peacefully. “I am here to ensure the enforcement of our sovereign rights over maritime natural resources in our EEZ,” Jokowi said as quoted in a press release issued by the State Palace on Wednesday.

[Read full contents: https://www.cnnindonesia.com/nasional/20200108161434-20-463523/jokowi-indonesia-punya-hak-berdaulat-sumber-daya-laut-natuna ]

Why Does Indonesia, With Its Long Coastline, Still Import Salt?

(January 13, 2020) As one of the countries with the longest coastlines in the world, Indonesia is generally expected to be self-sufficient in domestic salt production. However, according to data provided by the Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, only produce a maximum of 2 million tons of salt per year, while it requires more than 4 million tons, most of it for industrial use. Indonesia is not self-sufficient in salt production due to lack of technology and limited land for soil erosion which can drastically affect output.

[Read full contents: https://www.cnbcindonesia.com/news/20200113134512-4-129577/punya-laut-luas-ri-kok-mabuk-garam-impor/2 ]

BPPT Moves To Speed Up SMART Cables For Improving Tsunami Early Warnings

(January 15, 2020) The plan to use the SMART(Science Monitoring and Reliable Telecommunications) Cable will strengthen the tsunami early warning detection system, characterizing tsunami sources, and forecasting tsunami waves in Indonesian territory. Technology Assessment and Application Agency (BPPT) Maritime Survey Technology Center in collaboration with the Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG) held a Workshop on Strengthening Tsunami Warning Operations Through SMART Cable Technology in Jakarta on Wednesday, January 15, 2020.

[Read full contents: https://darilaut.id/berita/pemanfataan-smart-cable-alat-deteksi-dini-tsunami ]

Rising Sea Levels Pose Threat To Islands In Indonesia

(January 14, 2020) Climate change and its associated rise in sea levels could prove a significant threat to some of small islands in South Sumatra. According to the Wahana Lingkungan Hidup Indonesia (Walhi), Four other islands were also threatened to sink in 2020 due to global warming.

[Read full contents: https://www.cnnindonesia.com/nasional/20200114165804-20-465289/walhi-air-laut-naik-2-pulau-di-sumsel-tenggelam-4-terancam ]

3,300 Artificial Reef in the Bangka Sea

(January 21, 2020) PT Timah Tbk has planted 3,300 Artificial Reef units in the Bangka Sea over the past few years. This is a form of marine reclamation by the company so that the ecosystem can grow and bring sustainable economic benefits. So far sea reclamation has shown positive results.

[Read full contents: https://investor.id/business/pt-timah-sebar-3300-artificial-reef-di-laut-bangka]


2 Satellites Ready to Launch for Monitoring Sea Levels

(January 14, 2020) Two new satellites will provide more detailed information about rising sea levels and other ocean changes. Launching in Nov 2020, the Sentinel-6/Jason Continuity of Service mission (Jason-CS) will be the longest-running Earth observation mission dedicated to studying the rising oceans.

[Read full contents: https://sains.kompas.com/read/2020/01/14/070300323/pantau-kenaikan-air-laut-di-muka-bumi-2-satelit-ini-siap-diluncurkan?page=all]

Fishery Improvement Project for Long-line Tuna

(January 22, 2020) New fishery improvement projects (FIPs) in Indonesia seek to make significant portions of the country’s valuable tuna. The national, industry-led long-line tuna FIP by Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP), which has been working on the project to improve tuna long-line fisheries towards responsible and sustainable tuna fishing practices so as to increase the competitiveness. The program promotes accountability for recording catches, their origin, prohibition on cutting shark fins on ships, by catching data collection.

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/01/27/diluncurkan-program-perbaikan-perikanan-tuna-longline-demi-sustainable-fisheries/]

Government and Society Synergy For Community-based Watershed Management

(January 23, 2020) Improving the welfare of fish growers and sustainability of the mainland aquatic ecosystem (PUD) and watersheds (DAS), became a dual mission carried out by the Government of Indonesia in the aquaculture sub-sector. To realize the mission, the Government through the Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (KKP) began testing the application of cultured based fisheries (CBF) technology or fisheries techniques by utilizing available natural foods.

[Read full contents: https://www.mongabay.co.id/2020/01/23/sinergi-perikanan-budi-daya-dengan-perairan-umum-daratan/ ]