Daffodil

Daffodil


Daffodils are members of the genus (family) Narcissus. Though their botanic name is narcissus, daffodils are sometimes called jonquils, and in England, because of their long association with Lent, they are known "Lent Lillies”.

There are many different types of narcissus (daffodils) resulting from plant cross-breeding over the years. The narcissus that grows in Israel is the Narcissus tazetta, commonly referred to as a daffodil. This daffodil was a different variety from the yellow petalled blooms that we see in the UK. The Narcissus tazetta has cream or white petals surrounding a central orange-yellow cup.

The name Narcissus occurs only once in the Bible. At the end of his letter to the Romans (Romans 16:11), Paul meets with a number of people, including a householder called Narcissus. The householder’s name comes from the Greek myth about Narcissus, the beautiful youth who fell in love with his own reflection in a pool of water, and drowned trying to embrace it. Because Narcissus was reborn as a flower after his death, the narcissus is sometimes used to signify the triumph of divine love and sacrifice over death, selfishness and sin. Because it relates to rebirth and new beginnings, the daffodil is synonymous with spring.

Paul was worried about leaders becoming too interested in themselves (narcissism) and warns us in 2 Timothy 1-4 “You must understand this, that in the last days distressing times will come. For people will be lovers of themselves, lovers of money, boasters, arrogant, abusive, disobedient to their parents, ungrateful, unholy, inhuman, implacable, slanderers, profligates, brutes, haters of good, treacherous, reckless, swollen with conceit, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God”.